Tag: whole grain

Taste Test: Healthier Crackers

by in Taste Test, June 21, 2014

crackers
Have you  browsed the cracker aisle lately? In addition to stocking the classic varieties, shelves are overflowing with versions made from whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds. But are these options really what they’re cracked up to be?

The Criteria
For this taste test, we chose the plain or original flavor crackers. Each was tasted alone, without any toppings or condiments. The crackers were rated on calories, fat, fiber and sodium, along with ingredients (including preservatives and additives), flavor, texture and cost. Each brand was rated on a 5-point scale, with 5 being highest.

Kashi Original 7 Grain Snack Crackers (above)
Rating: 5.0
Cost (per ounce): $0.44
Nutrition Info (per serving: 15 crackers): 120 calories; 3.5 grams total fat; 160 milligrams sodium; 3 grams fiber
The Healthy Eats Take: With plenty of crackers per serving (15!) and a respectable amount of fiber, these delicious crackers won’t leave you hungry. The snacks have a hearty crunch and a well-rounded list of whole-grain ingredients, including millet, oats, hard red wheat, brown rice, barley, buckwheat and sesame seeds.

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20 Top Healthy Corn Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, August 22, 2013

corn salad
Corn season is now in full swing. Enjoy this scrumptious veggie in every type of dish from breakfast to salads to side dishes. The toughest decision you’ll need to make is choosing which recipe to pick first.

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Food Fight: Multigrain vs. Whole Wheat Bread

by in Food Fight, September 20, 2012

bread
Terms like “whole wheat” and “multi-grain” are often used interchangeably, but they aren’t actually the same thing. Here’s a closer look into each, plus the winner of this food fight.

Understanding Whole Grains
Before delving into this battle, we need to settle on the term whole grain. All grains are made of 3 parts: the large endosperm (with protein and carbs), the germ (with fat and B-vitamins) and the outer bran (with fiber and vitamins). When a food is labeled as 100% whole grain, this means that the entire grain (all 3 parts) is left intact. When the food is refined or milled (like in white bread), this means the bran and most of the germ has been removed during processing.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that at least half the grain you consume daily should come from whole grains. To do so, choose 100% whole grain over refined bread varieties.

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Meet This Grain: Amaranth

by in Gluten-Free, Healthy Recipes, February 17, 2012
amaranth
Have you tried amaranth?

This under-appreciated grain is a perfect way to get in your whole grains, plus it’s gluten-free. Get tips on cooking it and creative recipes to try this tiny grain.

What is Amaranth?
Also called pigweed or Chinese spinach, amaranth was a staple crop of the Aztecs who used to make idols from amaranth, honey and human blood. This outraged Cortes who burned the amaranth fields and decreed that anyone growing the crop would be killed.

Amaranth was rediscovered centuries later and about 60 varieties are available today. Although amaranth is categorized as a grain, it’s really a seed (just like quinoa). The tiny seeds are about the size of sesame seeds and have a yellowish color. The seeds can be used whole or ground into flour. They have a sweet and nutty flavor and are a bit crunchy when cooked. The greens of the plant are also edible and have a sweet flavor.

Today China is the biggest producer of the grain, but it’s also cultivated in Mexico, Central America and some areas in the U.S.

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Small Steps: Making Time For Breakfast

by in Healthy Tips, Small Steps, September 13, 2010
English Muffin Breakfast Pizza - Photo Courtesy Food Network Magazine

Is skipping breakfast part of your daily routine? Starting your day running on empty just makes your life tougher and is more stressful for your body. You may feel tired, without knowing why. As we begin Breakfast Week here on Healthy Eats, here are a few ways to help get you in the habit of eating a morning meal every day.
Take small steps towards a better breakfast »

Aisle by Aisle: Buying Healthy Bread

by in Grocery Shopping, Healthy Tips, June 15, 2009

bread
Take a walk down the bread aisle at your market and see how long it takes to find a loaf without high-fructose corn syrup. It took me 30 minutes the first time I tried! Many packaged bread loaves have added ingredients that aren’t so healthy, even though their labels sport fancy words like “multigrain” and “unbleached flour.” Follow these tips to make sure you get the healthiest.

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