Tag: vegetables

Can’t Get Enough Butternut Squash?

by in Uncategorized, November 19, 2013

lemon-maple squash

Butternut squash is one of the most popular of the winter squash varieties. Sure, it can be tricky to peel (try these tips, or go for pre-prepped options), but the yield is high and the uses are many.

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8 Tricks for Using Kitchen Scraps

by in Uncategorized, October 11, 2013

carrot with tops
It isn’t rare to hear comments about the costs associated with eating healthy. But utilizing food scraps (like stale bread and carrot stems), which are inevitable in most kitchens, is one easy way to save money. Here are eight tips.

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Break Out of a Veggie Rut!

by in Healthy Tips, September 30, 2013

chard, sqaush, and tomatoes
Have the desire to eat more vegetables but find yourself always turning to the same familiar picks? Figure out which other veggies might be in your comfort zone with these comparisons.

If you like kale, try Swiss chard
This popular leafy green has an underappreciated relative! Pick up a bunch of Swiss chard and enjoy the succulent green leaves and delicate, crunchy stems.

Recipe: Chard, Squash and Tomatoes (above, from Food Network Magazine)

If you like apples, try jicama
Fresh, crunchy and slightly sweet–this lesser known root veggie is low in calories (45 per cup) and high in fiber.

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Top 5 Fall Vegetables

by in Healthy Recipes, In Season, September 21, 2013

butternut squash
Fall starts tomorrow! And with the arrival of crisp days comes a bounty of seasonal veggies. Here are my top five, plus delicious ways to incorporate them into your meals.

1. Pumpkin
Pumpkins are fun to turn into Jack-o-lanterns, but you can use the flesh, seeds and empty pumpkin shell in your kitchen to make delicious and antioxidant-packed dishes. If cooking with fresh pumpkin is too labor intensive, use canned pumpkin puree (made from 100% pure pumpkin) to get the same nutritional goodness without the hassle.

Recipes to try:

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How to Make a French Fry Out of (Almost) Any Vegetable

by in Uncategorized, August 3, 2013

zucchini
When you think french fries, you think potatoes, right? But who made spuds the king of the fry? Turns out, lots of delicious vegetables make great finger food, and there’s no need to deep-fry!

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Why You Should Love Those Weird Lettuces

by in Uncategorized, July 15, 2013

mizuna
These days, there are more than 100 varieties of lettuce available, giving us an endless assortment of colors, textures and shapes to adorn our plates — and countless ways to work more healthy greens into our diets. (Read more here about creative uses for leafy greens.)

In addition to traditional lettuces, unique, heirloom varieties are often offered at farmers’ markets, and they’re definitely worth a try. Don’t be shy: When perusing lettuce, ask questions such as, “Is this lettuce more like a buttery Bibb or sharp arugula?” The grower will love bragging about the taste and textural qualities of the leaves!

And for those times when you don’t have the opportunity to ask, use this cheat sheet!

Butter Oak: Varieties include Flashy and Blushed; the oak-shaped, super soft leaves are achieved by crossing butterhead-type lettuce with oak leaf lettuce.

Buttercrunch: Bibb-type lettuce with thick, juicy leaves and subtle buttery flavor.

Cimarron: Large, tender, red romaine with orange-yellow center; flavor resembles blend of red lettuce and romaine.

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In Season: Red Globe Radishes

by in In Season, May 31, 2013

radish

What They Are and When to Enjoy:
Radishes belong to the cruciferous vegetable family which takes its name from the Latin root crux, meaning cross. But rest assured, eating them is no cross to bear! They are deliciously crisp and fresh tasting with a subtle spiciness.

Enjoy radishes at their finest in April, May and June. Red Globe are the most common variety in the U.S and are frequently sold with their greens attached. To choose the best ones give them a squeeze. The bulbs should feel firm, not soft. Crisp, green leaves and medium-sized roots are also good indicators of a winning bunch.

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How Many Vegetables Should You Eat?

by in Healthy Tips, May 8, 2013

carrots
Most folks don’t get enough of the recommended dietary servings of veggies and miss out on the health benefits—like a lower risk of heart disease, possible reduction in blood pressure, and protection against certain types of cancer. Understanding how much counts as one serving can help you plan your meals to meet the recommendations.

The Recommendations
According to USDA’s My Plate 100% vegetable juice, dark green vegetables (broccoli and mustard greens), red and orange veggies (carrots and peppers), starchy vegetables (corn and potatoes), and beans and peas (kidney and soy beans) all count towards your recommended daily servings. Fresh, canned, frozen, dried, whole, cut up and pureed veggies all count.

Adults 18 years and older should aim to take in between 2 ½ to 3 cups of vegetables per day. Here are the specific guidelines:

Women:

  • 19 to 50 years: 2 cups
  • 51 years and older: 1 ½ cups

Men:

  • 19 years to 50 years: 3 cups
  • 51 years and older: 2 ½ cups

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How to Prevent Vitamin Loss When Cooking Vegetables

by in Healthy Tips, April 8, 2013

asparagus
There’s no doubt vegetables have lots of good nutrition to offer, but how you purchase, store, and prepare them can dramatically affect their value.  Here’s what you need to know when cooking up your favorite veggies.

Farm to Table
As soon as vegetables are picked, their nutrient clock beings to tick away. The more time it spends off the plant, the more vitamins will be lost.

For this reason, seeking out local produce when possible is never a bad idea — the less time it takes for the veggies to get to your plate, the more nutrients they’ll retain. Support local agriculture in your community or get your hands dirty by planting some of your own herbs and vegetables – you can’t get more local than that.

Home Storage
Once you get those fresh vegetables home, minimize additional nutrient loss by eating them right away or storing in the refrigerator or freezer. Cold temperatures will limit the degradation of vitamins so use the vegetable drawer in your fridge (where humidity is higher) and store in an air-tight bag or container. Avoid trimming and chopping prior to storage too, this will limit surface area and help lock more of the vitamins inside.

Get tips for the best way to freeze vegetables

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15 Healthy Cauliflower Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, March 9, 2013

cauliflower couscous
Everyone’s buzzing about cauliflower these days. It’s simple, tasty and apparently very trendy; we love that this cruciferous veggie is getting a chance to shine!

Healthy Attributes
Low in calories (25 per cup) but high in nutrients (fiber and vitamins C, K and B6), cauliflower also boasts various antioxidants, including those that may help prevent certain types of cancer.

Cauliflower is unique because has the ability to morph into many different forms. When it’s mashed, pureed, roasted or boiled – the texture and flavor completely change.

White is the most widely available variety, but you may also be able to find green, purple and orange versions at your local famers’ market.

Mains
Mahi Mahi With Cauliflower
Sicilian Cauliflower Pasta
Shepherd’s Pie
No-Bake Macaroni and Cheese

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