Tag: vegetables

Nutrition News: Healthiest Veggie-Cooking Methods, Pregnancy Obesity Risks, Silk For Fresh Fruit

by in Food News, May 13, 2016

Healthier veggie prep

We all know vegetables are healthy, but some ways of preparing them are healthier than others. In general, cooked beats raw, CNN reports, noting, “Studies show the process of cooking actually breaks down tough outer layers and cellular structure of many vegetables, making it easier for your body to absorb their nutrients.” And while the ideal method may differ slightly for different vegetables, the news site reports, as a rule of thumb it’s often best to steam (don’t boil) or microwave your veggies and “keep cooking time, temperature and the amount of liquid to a minimum.” Then throw in a wee bit of olive oil and you’re good to go. Read more

7 Brilliant Ways to Replace Bread with Veggies

by in Healthy Recipes, March 11, 2016

Breadless Italian SubIt’s not that we don’t love you, bread, but sometimes we just need some space, OK? Cutting down on this carb (especially the white stuff) is often a quick way to lower a dish’s calorie count and likely reduce the sugar, too. But the best part is really that (hello!) veggies taste great. The flavors could totally transform your meal for the better, as we think they did in these recipes.

Breadless Italian Sub Sandwich (above)

This sandwich mimics the classic shape of its namesake by swapping a doughy hoagie roll for a couple of meaty, chubby portobello mushroom caps.
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Spiralize It! And Win a Paderno Spiralizer from Williams-Sonoma

by in Giveaway, July 14, 2015

 

Sometimes you just need to take your produce for a spin — or, in this case, a spiral. Easy to use and with a small countertop footprint, the Paderno Spiralizer can turn most firm fruits and vegetables into neat piles of curlicues of all sizes, destined for dishes like salads, stir-fries and pasta. This fun shape may even entice picky eaters to bulk up on their veggies. Read more

Cooked Versus Raw: Some Veggies Like the Heat

by in Healthy Tips, April 15, 2015

Talk to raw-food advocates and they’ll insist that food is most nutritious if it never hits temperatures above 116 degrees. However, the theory that vegetables are healthier raw isn’t always true. The nutrients in some vegetables — including the five mentioned below — become more bioavailable, or readily available for your body to absorb, once they’re cooked. Read more

Food As Medicine: Why Doctors Are Writing Prescriptions for Produce

by in Food News, March 26, 2015

Every day, millions of people — adults and children — in this country with Type 2 diabetes hit their pharmacy for a variety of medicines to control that condition as well as other obesity-related ills. But what if instead of the pharmacist giving them drugs to manage their diseases, they were handed a bin of fruits and vegetables to help prevent them? Read more

The Chef’s Take: Chris Barnett’s Trash Vegetables from Stir Market

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Dining Out, January 7, 2015

Beet Salad
There was a time when carrot skins, radish greens and beet tops used to go straight from the cutting board to the trash bin. Then came the compost movement and all those vegetable scraps were destined for a future as fantastic fertilizer. Now comes chef Chris Barnett of Los Angeles’ Stir Market — a boutique California take on the classic European food-hall experience — who’s decided that one chef’s trash is indeed another’s treasure. Rather than toss his vegetable scraps in the garbage or compost bin, he uses them on his menu — think nose-to-tail cooking but with a carrot standing in for a pig.

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The Next Big Thing in the Produce Aisle: Tiny Vegetables.

by in Trends, May 26, 2014

baby vegetables
Baby corn has long been a stir-fry staple, and those so-named baby carrots have become the obligatory sidekick to hummus. But small vegetables only seem to betting bigger — at least in supermarkets and restaurants. Earlier this year, California’s Shanley Farms introduced “single-serving” avocados (trademark name: Gator Eggs) sold in clever packages reminiscent of egg cartons. Produce titan Green Giant sells Little Gem Lettuce Hearts, a lettuce hybrid that resembles romaine in miniature. Not to mention the countless iterations of baby broccoli — in fact, a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale — that appear in grocery stores everywhere. Are bitty vegetables merely an eye-catching novelty or are there culinary benefits to downsized produce?

At least for chefs, the most desirable baby vegetables are generally the ones that are indeed babies — that is, harvested young. “When grown well and picked fresh, baby vegetables eat beautifully,” says Aimee Olexy, chef and owner of Talula’s Garden and Talula’s Daily, in Philadelphia. “Often tender and sweet, they require less overall cooking and retain a more perky mouthfeel and appeal on the plate. Young baby peas and beets are almost always wonderful, and a dainty little treat worth the work,” she says.

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For the Love of Vegetables: Recipes That Celebrate Produce, Year-Round

by in Cookbooks, May 19, 2014

beekman vegetable cookbook

The journey of Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge from New York City executives to country farmers has been well-chronicled — on the reality TV show The Fabulous Beekman Boys and in their best-selling cookbook The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Cookbook (both named after their historic home in upstate New York, Beekman 1802). Combining their business savvy with their love of the land and what it can produce, the duo have become well-known for turning a struggling goat farm into a thriving enterprise, producing goat’s milk soap, artisanal cheese and a cornucopia of vegetables.

Their latest book, The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Vegetable Cookbook: 100 Delicious Heritage Recipes from the Farm and Garden, is year-round celebration of what they grow, and delicious ways in which home cooks can share in the bounty.

What’s a good way to expand your vegetable palate beyond the basics?
When in doubt, roast. Nearly any vegetable can be tossed in olive oil and salt — and red pepper flakes if you like them — and roasted in a 375 to 400 degree oven until browned and softened. It works with everything from the hardest winter squashes to delicate hearts of romaine lettuce. If there’s anything you’re curious about, buy it, roast it, and chances are, you’ll love it.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, April 3, 2014

vegetables and herbs
In this week’s news: Vegetables save lives (seven-a-day is the new five-a-day); baseball stadiums cater to the Whole Foods set; and scientists keep putting monkeys on wacky diets.

For a Longer Life, Pass the Salad Tongs
Given all the nutrition studies out there, you might think researchers have tested every hypothetical in the book. Turns out there was a ginormous one missing. Earlier this week, researchers at University College London released the very first report to not just associate eating fruits and vegetables with reduced risk of death of any cause but also to put numbers to the benefit per serving: Eat seven or more portions of produce, and you’ll apparently be 42 percent less likely to die at any given point in time. (Note that the magic of statistics make this sound a little more exciting that in is: No matter how many carrots you eat, you will keel over, eventually.) Drawing on a Health Survey for England data set involving 65,226 people between 2001 and 2013, the study was also able to narrow things down by portion (five to seven servings might buy you a 36 percent reduction, and three to five could get you 25 percent). Fresh produce had the strongest effect, reducing risk by 16 percent per portion. Canned or frozen fruit appeared to increase death odds by 17 percent, most likely because of the foods’ sugar content say the researchers. Always a good bet? Salad, which was associated with a 13 percent gain in the longevity department.

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5 Great Reasons to Eat Cabbage

by in Healthy Tips, March 17, 2014

corned beef and cabbage soup
Cabbage is the iconic veggie of St. Patrick’s Day, to be savored and enjoyed — with or without corned beef. Here are five very good reasons to pick up a head (or two!).

1. Help Reduce Your Risk of Cancer
Cabbage is part of the cruciferous veggie family, along with Brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower and kale. According to a 2012 meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Urology, people who ate more vegetables from the cabbage family were found to have a lower risk of prostate cancer. Additional studies have also found that eating foods from the cruciferous group may reduce the risk of stomach, mouth, colorectal and pancreatic cancers.

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