Tag: soup

The Chef’s Take: Kabocha Squash Soup from The Fat Radish

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Cookbooks, October 1, 2014

Fat Radish CookbookThe Fat Radish, which opened in 2010, is one of those perfect New York City restaurants. The uncomplicated, slightly British, vegetable-focused menu traces the seasons with local as its mantra. The design is that effortless combination of reclaimed barnyard and weathered industrial chic. The atmosphere is friendly and welcoming. And the folks in the seats all look as though they might have just walked off the set of Girls. All the pieces come together courtesy of owners Ben Towill and Phil Winser, self-taught cooks who are passionate about good ingredients, great design, and feeding guests well.
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What are the Health Benefits of Passover Foods?

by in Healthy Holidays, April 14, 2014

matzo ball soup
This spring holiday is filled with more than just matzo. From traditional dishes to symbolic foods, the Passover feast is filled with a wide variety of good-for-you nutrients.

#1: Egg
Hard-boiled eggs mixed with salt water are served as an appetizer during the Passover feast.

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Easy Pasta e Fagioli Soup

by in Robin's Healthy Take, October 18, 2013

pasta e fagioli
Talk about comfort food. Pasta e fagioli is an Italian dish that literally means “pasta and beans.” Once considered a peasant dish because it consisted only of inexpensive ingredients, the Italian staple has countless variations. Many recipes use bacon or pancetta, but I love the simplicity and overwhelming goodness of this version, crammed with flavor and texture from a variety of fresh and dried herbs, vegetables, white beans, tomato sauce and tube-shaped pasta. Even better? The soup is low in saturated fat and crammed with fiber, boasting 16 grams per serving.

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How to Make A Healthier Soup

by in Healthy Recipes, Healthy Tips, October 8, 2013

broccoli cheddar soup
As the cold weather sets in, bone-warming soups really hit the spot. But there’s no need to pack on the heavy-cream pounds when indulging in a delicious bowl of goodness.

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Roasted Beet and Apple Soup

by in Healthy Recipes, January 30, 2013

beet soup

I teach cooking classes on a regular basis and I always try to include a soup as it’s an easy way to incorporate more vegetables into your diet. Served as a starter or eaten as a meal, soups are warming and nutritious this time of year. Roasted beets add a mellow sweetness and beautiful magenta color to this dish. It’s perfect for any day but would be a great way to express your admiration for a loved one as Valentine’s Day approaches.

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Robin’s Healthy Take: Cold Days, Hot Soups

by in Robin's Healthy Take, February 6, 2012
onion soup
Warm right up with caramelized onion soup, topped with cheesy bread.

I realize it’s doesn’t get really cold in the desert (where I live), but I’m an east coast native, so I know how bone-chilling February can get. Only two things warm me up when I’m chilled to the core: a hot bath and hot soup. This week, I’m sharing three of my favorite hot soups for cold days. The onion soup is my all-time favorite (it has been, since I was like 7). When you make it, take the time to really caramelize the onions until they’re deep golden brown, like they’ve been dipped in caramel. And, use oven-proof soup bowls so you can melt the cheese under the broiler.  For the butternut squash soup, the key is roasting the squash because it caramelizes the flesh and makes it tender and sweet. I also add cumin and ginger before roasting to bring out the warm smokiness of the spices.  The Tuscan soup is a hearty blend of ham, beans, kale and sage. I used white beans, but any bean variety will work. Serve with a wedge of toasted Italian bread with olive oil and you’ll be transported to Italy in under 30 minutes.

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It’s National Soup Month!

by in Healthy Recipes, January 22, 2012
Guy's Ginger-Carrot Soup
Happy National Soup Month!

Celebrate National Soup Month by staying warm (and healthy!) with Food Network chefs’ best low-cal soups, from the latest issue of Food Network Magazine.

Guy’s carrot, ginger and potato soup (pictured above) has less than 200 calories per serving. Top with low-fat Greek yogurt and pine nuts for a creamy-crunchy combination.

Add a new soup to your go-to list. Full of chiles, peppers and shrimp, we guarantee you’ll love this Spicy Shrimp Broth from Marcela Valladolid.

Emeril’s take on the classic chicken soup has mint, lemon and red pepper flakes. Don’t forget the cayenne pepper for an extra kick.

Swiss chard, carrots, cannellini beans and spinach come together in Bobby’s hearty Minestrone With Parmigiano-Reggiano for a delicious dish that has less than 300 calories.

Ellie’s lightened-up New! New England Clam Chowder is anything but boring. Canadian bacon gives it subtle smoky tones, while hot sauce takes the flavor to a whole new level.

What’s your favorite soup?

Healthy Cooking Tool: Hand Blender

by in Uncategorized, January 17, 2012
hand blender
Use a hand blender in recipes that call for a standard blender.

We’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers and healthy eating advocates to host a Healthy Every Week Challenge, a month-long initiative to develop healthy eating habits. The plan an is to develop a manageable healthy habit each week that will carry through the new year. Join us here and share what you’re eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #gethealthy.

One tool that no healthy home kitchen should be without is a hand blender (also called an immersion blender). This svelte little tool goes right into your soup, sauce or smoothie, allowing you to blend up something creamy, without transferring liquids from pot to blender. And with one of these, you’ll never deal with a soup-blender explosion again. When you close the lid on hot liquids and then blend, the steam can build up and cause the lid to blow off, sending hot soup flying all around your kitchen. When you bring the blender to the soup, that won’t happen.

You can even use this blender to mix up pancake or crepe batter in seconds.

Use a hand blender to make these recipes:

Mushroom-Hummus Soup

Nutty Sweet Potato Soup

Orange-Banana Smoothie

Lentil Soup

Butternut Squash Soup

Chicken Sate With Spicy Peanut Dipping Sauce

Souffle Pancake With Apple-Pear Compote

You can buy this Cuisinart hand blender for $29.99 at the Food Network Store, and if you join us tonight on Twitter at 8:30pm for a chat about healthy cooking at home (#gethealthy), we’re giving away two of these hand blenders at the end of the chat.

Tell us: Do you own a hand blender? How do you use yours?

Nutrition Myths Debunked: Does Chicken Soup Cure a Cold?

by in Healthy Tips, November 29, 2011
chicken soup
Can soup cure the sniffles?

Going as far back as the 12th century, Jewish scholars have touted the effectiveness of chicken soup for a variety of ailments, including the common cold. Even today, when you’re in bed with a cold, someone has either reminded you of its goodness or brought you a piping hot bowl. Are the wonders of chicken soup just cultural myths passed down from generation to generation, or can soup really cure a cold?

What’s In It?
Chicken soup is made from a stock or broth and a variety of veggies. In a stock, the chicken bones are cooked for a few hours. This gives enough time for minerals like zinc, calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium to seep into the liquid stock. These same minerals won’t be in a broth since a broth is typically made from the meat only. Don’t discount out the nutritional goodness of broth though,  it’s still brimming with minerals like selenium and phosphorus. Of course both soups and stocks are made from a variety of veggies like celery, onion, carrots, leeks, parsnips, or turnips —  all of their minerals seep into the liquid too.

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Thanksgiving Leftovers: Soup’s On!

by in 5-Ingredient Recipes, Thanksgiving, November 25, 2011
turkey stock
Make a homeade stock out of your Thanksgiving leftovers and turn it into 3 easy soups.

You can only heat up a plate of gravy-drenched turkey dinner leftovers so many times! Go a little lighter with your Thanksgiving memories by making any of these 3 easy and tasty soups. They all start out with a fresh pot of stock made with stuff you’ve got lying around the kitchen.

Turkey Stock
Don’t toss out the remnants of your turkey! Go the extra mile and turn it into an amazingly delicious stock. A large pot, some water and vegetable scraps (you’ve definitely got those around) and you’re set. Let it simmer away while the family settles into a cozy food coma.

Basic Turkey Stock
Makes 2 quarts

1 roasted turkey carcass (from a 10-pound turkey)
2 pounds raw vegetable scraps (carrots, celery, onions, leeks and garlic recommended)
1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 teaspoons black peppercorns
2 bay leaves
Water

Combine ingredients in a large stockpot and add enough cold water to cover. Bring to a slow boil, reduce to a simmer and cook uncovered for 2 to 3 hours. Strain and transfer to quart containers. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or in the freezer for up to 6 months.

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