Tag: smoothies

What Makes a Good Protein Shake?

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, June 21, 2016

Confused about protein shakes? You certainly aren’t alone. It’s tricky to tell what’s healthy to sip and what will lead to a calorie overload. Here’s how to build a healthier shake with all the nutrients your body needs (and nothing it doesn’t) after exercise.

Sports Nutrition

The best time to have a protein shake is after a workout, since in the hour immediately following exercise, your body is craving nutrients and fluids to help replenish energy stores and allow worn-out muscles to recover. A beverage can be a perfect delivery system, but that doesn’t mean you can just toss anything into a blender. Your muscles require a balance of carbohydrate and protein, ideally in a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio. In order to achieve this nutrient goal, choose from some of these star ingredients.

Fruit: Fresh and frozen fruit add natural sweetness as well as vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants to help fight inflammation after a hard workout. Read more

Nutrition News: Smoothies, Calorie Disclosure Rules, Diet and High School Sports

by in Food News, May 20, 2016

Smoothie operators

“Do I absorb more sugar and calories when I drink fruits and vegetables in a smoothie as opposed to just eating them whole?” The question was put to The New York Times’ Well blog this week, which consulted a dietitian representing the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and returned with an answer: Yes, “very likely.” Basically, the issue is one of “quantity,” the Times was told. You may well consume a lot in a short time when you drink a smoothie, without even realizing it. Plus, you may feel hungrier more quickly after you drink a smoothie than you would after eating whole fruit, because fiber, which slows down the sugar-to-blood-sugar conversion process, gets pulverized when the fruit is blended for smoothie consumption. And that’s just talking about smoothies you make at home, the Times notes. Store-bought smoothies often pack a big caloric punch along with added sugar, honey or other sweeteners — and may not even contain whole fruit at all.

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Good or Bad: Smoothie Bowls

by in Is It Healthy?, May 10, 2016

Are you on trend with the smoothie-bowl phenomenon? Instead of sipping that smoothie, pour it into a bowl and add toppers like nuts, seeds and chunks of fresh fruit. Find out if these new vessels are healthy choices for your breakfast. Read more

Now Trending: Smoothie-Delivery Programs

by in Food News, February 1, 2016

The popularity of home-delivery cooking services continues to grow. Think beyond meal programs: Now smoothie and juice lovers can get in on the action. We took a few of the most-popular options for a whirl in our blenders.

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Six Protein Powders for Smoothie Making

by in Healthy Tips, August 10, 2015

Looking to bulk up your smoothie? Then chances are you’re going to reach for a protein powder. The question is, which one should you choose? As the options get more plentiful, the choice also gets more confusing. Whichever you decide on, be sure to read the nutrition label to see how much you need to use. “Twenty to 25 grams of protein is a safe amount to add, but depending on the protein source, that could mean anywhere from half a scoop to two full scoops,” says Kelly Pritchett, Ph.D., R.D., a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Read more

5 Smoothies Inspired by Starbucks’ New Kale Creation

by in Healthy Recipes, April 6, 2015

Kale is going national. Not only is it being explored by McDonald’s and Olive Garden, but it’s also making its debut in more than 4,300 Starbucks locations. The Sweet Greens Evolution Smoothie includes a juice base of celery, mango, apple, banana, cucumber, spinach, romaine lettuce, kale, lime and parsley, plus nonfat Greek yogurt. Additional smoothie options on the menu include Strawberry and Mango Carrot. Customers can also add in fresh kale or additional yogurt upon ordering. The 16-ounce serving clocks in at 170 Calories, with 0.5 grams of fat, 7 grams of protein, 36 carbohydrates, 32 grams of sugar and 2 grams of fiber, which makes it a healthy choice for breakfast or an afternoon snack. “You are actually taking in three food groups: veggies, fruit and dairy, and getting the nutrients that come with it,” says registered dietitian Toby Amidor. Can’t get to your local coffee location? Make our favorite smoothies, below. Read more

Banana-Coconut Pudding Smoothie

by in Gluten-Free, April 3, 2015

The best way to add sweetness to your smoothie without adding sugar? Dates. They’re sweet and also full of soluble fiber to fill you up — just the solution for a morning meal. Read more

Go Bananas! 10 Healthy Ways to Use Ripe Ones Now

by in Healthy Recipes, January 24, 2015

Look over on your kitchen counter — are they sitting there? Those super-ripe bananas must be used ASAP or else they’ll get tossed. Let these 10 healthy recipes — smoothies, muffins, pancakes and more — come to the rescue!

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Smoothie of the Month: Frozen Peach and Ginger

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, July 1, 2014

peach smoothie
Nothing says summer like fragrant, juicy peaches. Their sweet, tangy flesh also makes the ideal base for a variety of summer smoothies.

Peaches have a subtle flavor that can easily be masked by stronger ones, so if you want the peach to shine, stick to ingredients that enhance their floral quality.

Here, I add a pinch of fresh ginger, vanilla and a touch of honey — along with soaked cashews, which create a velvety texture when blended with fruit. Freezing the peaches beforehand results in an ultra-thick and creamy smoothie that goes down well on hot, humid days.

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The Beauty of Smoothie Bowls (Yes, They’re Smoothies—in Bowls)

by in Trends, June 23, 2014

smoothie bowl
It’s the new smoothie dilemma: Straw or spoon? Just when you thought the world of liquid meals was complete, along comes something new. The latest trend in purified food: Smoothie bowls. That’s right, these are smoothies, but you eat them out of a bowl. Before you write off this craze as just as change of scenery for your smoothie, there are, apparently, a few key distinctions between an old-style smoothie you drink and the newer, smoothie-in-a-bowl versions.

Besides the obvious difference in how you consume it, smoothie bowls provide the opportunity to get even more creative with liquefied creations. Because smoothie bowls don’t have to be slurped through a straw, cooks have the option to make the concoction as thick as they want — blending in ingredients like seeds, frozen bananas, nut butters or even avocado for added heft and texture.

“Smoothie bowls are essentially more nutrient-dense smoothies, thick enough to eat with a spoon and often topped with fruits, nuts, seeds, muesli or granola,” explains McKel Hill, MS, RD, and creator of the plant-based, whole foods blog Nutrition Stripped. “Think of smoothie bowls as the new cereal — like cereal 2.0.”

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