Tag: root vegetables

The Chefs’ Take: Parsnips

by in Chefs and Restaurants, January 10, 2017

A thick, taupe-hued version of the ubiquitous, snack-friendly carrot, the parsnip is an unsung root vegetable seldom eaten raw. Then winter arrives, and its nutty profile deservedly gets the spotlight in a barrage of hearty soups and braises. But, there are other clever ways to celebrate the parsnip’s complexity this season.

Five nights a week, chef/owner Nicolas Delaroque of Nico in San Francisco serves a five-course tasting menu. Inevitably, parsnips make a cameo this time of the year. “I enjoy their versatility. We can use them in so many types of cooking,” he explains. That’s why he embraces the vegetable’s floral notes and incorporates them into a dessert. One splurge-worthy scoop of brown butter ice cream is dressed with fried parsnip chips and wood sorrel. “Parsnips have a sweet disposition, and with the cozy, warm feel of maple and bourbon, it just makes sense on a cold day.” Read more

5 Root Vegetables You Need To Try

by in In Season, January 7, 2017

When you think of root vegetables, do you automatically picture potatoes, carrots and onions? While these veggies are classic favorites, they can also be a bit uninspiring. Luckily, the cold weather brings some delectable and underutilized root vegetables to the forefront. Try something new in your cold-weather cooking and branch out into turnips, rutabaga, celeriac, sunchokes or parsnips. These veggies are supremely nutritious and can be used in a variety of ways.

Turnips

A member of the cabbage family, turnips look like a mix between a radish and beet. Not only can you eat the bulb, but the turnip greens are edible too. Packed with vitamins and minerals, the greens have a taste similar to kale. The turnip bulb is a good source of potassium, a nutrient known for lowering blood pressure, and the greens contain calcium, vitamin K and vitamin A. Eating the entire turnip is a surefire way to get your daily dose of nutrients.

“Turnips are delicious when prepared simply,” says chef and registered dietitian Abbie Gellman, M.S., R.D., CDN. “Toss with olive oil, salt and pepper, and roast at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes or until golden brown.”

Rutabaga

Also known as a yellow turnip, a rutabaga is slightly larger and sweeter than a turnip and pale yellow in color. The waxy outer skin prevents dehydration, and the flesh turns somewhat orange when cooked. Rutabagas are an excellent source of vitamin C to help ward off winter colds, and they also contain potassium and fiber.

This starchy vegetable lends itself well to a basic mash. Try swapping out half the Yukon golds for rutabaga in your basic mashed potato recipe. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Roasted Root Vegetable Breakfast from Zoe Nathan

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 10, 2014

roasted root vegetables with egg
Many people who crowd into chef Zoe Nathan’s Huckleberry Café in Santa Monica come for her phenomenal morning pastries and baked goods, including the likes of chocolate-almond muffins, blueberry scones and lemon-kumquat teacake. But Nathan — who is a veteran of San Francisco’s cult favorite bakery, Tartine — was actually trained as a chef, not a baker, and cooked at restaurants like bld in Los Angeles and Lupa in New York City before convincing her now-husband and business partner Josh Loeb to hire her as a pastry chef at his restaurant Rustic Canyon. “I had never done desserts before,” she recalls. “At Tartine, I had done breakfast breads and lots of savories, so I kind of lied and told him I had pastry chef experience, and then when I got the job, I had to go to my parent’s house to teach myself how to bake!”

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12 Delicious Ways with Root Vegetables

by in Healthy Recipes, November 14, 2013

parsnips
Hearty root veggies make for delicious, bone-warming dishes. Pick them up on your next trip to the market and get cooking!

Parsnips
These root vegetables, which have a sweet, nutty flavor, resemble carrots but are white in color. One cup raw provides 100 calories and 7 grams of fiber. They’re an excellent source of vitamins C and K and folate.

Recipes to try:

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What to Do with Celery Root? Try This Mash.

by in Uncategorized, November 1, 2013

celery root mash

It’s not the prettiest vegetable in the garden, but celery root, aka celeriac, is brimming with nutrients.

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