Tag: quinoa

8 Tasty Ways to Get Your Whole Grains On

by in Healthy Recipes, October 12, 2014

Great Whole Grains
Sure, we love digging into brown rice bowls and plumping up our vegetable soups with barley, but there’s an array of other (sometimes obscure) good-for-us whole grains — from spelt to farro — we should be eating on the regular. Don’t overlook these nutritious alternatives hiding in grocery store bulk bins.

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Adding the Yum Factor to Gluten-Free Cooking

by in Cookbooks, August 21, 2014

quinoa

Six years ago, Erin Scott was the happy, food-loving owner of a lifestyle boutique in Oakland, Calif., when she discovered she had celiac disease. The diagnosis transformed her life — not just her eating habits but her career. Instead of wallowing in the downsides of a newfound gluten-free existence, she launched the (now-popular) blog Yummy Supper, spending her days tinkering in the kitchen and taking vibrant photos of the concoctions she made for her family, which includes two gluten-intolerant children.

That passion for creative cooking, and her determination to make “flavorful, seasonal, food that just tastes good,” has spawned the just-arrived Yummy Supper: 100 Fresh, Luscious & Honest Recipes from a {Gluten-Free} Omnivore, with dishes like quinoa tabbouleh (recipe below) and zucchini ribbon “pasta” — not to mention sweets such as pluot parfaits with sunflower seeds.

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Dessert of the Month: Nectarine-Raspberry Crisp with Quinoa Topping

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, August 19, 2014

nectarine-raspberry crisp
Crisps are one of the best summer desserts. They come together in minutes and can then be left alone to bake — no need to be exact about the timing, just bake until fragrant, golden and bubbling. With crisps, you get everything a pie has to offer in much less time and without any risk of a soggy crust.

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10 Health Foods We’re All Saying the Wrong Way (Kefir, Anyone?)

by in Healthy Tips, August 18, 2014

kefir

It’s a cruel fact: Many of the foods that are potentially good for us also have names seemingly designed to trip us up. Who among us did not have the red-in-the-face moment of learning that quinoa wasn’t pronounced “kee-noah”? To spare us all future embarrassment in the aisles of the Health Food Hut, here’s a guide to several food words known to cause verbal stumbles.

Acai
What it is: This dark purple berry is now ubiquitous in health-food store products everywhere, thanks to its reputed superfood powers. It’s a storehouse of antioxidants and may help support the immune system.
How to say it: You’ll sound like a pro at the smoothie shack when you ask to have “ah-sah-EE” added to the mix.

Agar (also, Agar-Agar)
What it is: This gelatinous substance is derived from red algae and used as a thickener and gelling agent in foods like puddings, jelly candies, soups and sauces. Because it comes from a plant (unlike gelatin, which is derived from animals), it’s popular with vegetarians and vegans who can’t resist a good pudding.
How to say it: It’s pronounced “AH-ger,” which, beer lovers will note, rhymes with lager.

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Salad of the Month: Quinoa, Fava Beans and Peas

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, May 13, 2014

quinoa and fava salad
Packed with fava beans, fresh herbs and peas, this salad will bring spring to the table in an instant. Mint, dill and scallions complement the ever-so-slightly-sweet flavor of the brown-rice vinegar seasoning, creating a bright and refreshing marinade for the salad. Quinoa provides the ideal texture and background, with plenty of protein and nutrients, making this salad a complete meal. Other spring vegetables can easily be added to the mix: Try blanched asparagus, radishes or sugar snap peas. Read more

Quinoa, Making a Move to Dessert

by in The Grain Attraction, May 3, 2014

quinoa pudding

Quinoa is still all the rage. And it’s no wonder. It’s full of protein, easy to make and extremely versatile. Just how versatile? Well, recently I’ve started eating it for dessert. That’s right, quinoa in the pudding!

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5 Ways to Eat More Alterna-Grains

by in Healthy Recipes, April 11, 2014

freekeh

Rice is over. Couscous is passe. It’s all about alterna-grains these days. But don’t just stock your pantry with these exotic-sounding carbs and hope for the best. Those wheat berries won’t cook themselves! Here’s what to do with your kitchen’s latest grainy guest stars.

Triple Herb Freekeh (above)
Get your freekeh on! In a simple dish like this one, which is simply grains, onions, herbs and a light lemon dressing, the type of grain you use makes all the difference. Chewy, nutty freekeh (roasted green wheat) will make this one a standout.

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3 Ways Quinoa is About to Blow Your Mind (at Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner)

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, March 21, 2014

quinoa

Quinoa is fast-cooking, versatile and protein-packed. Keep a pot of the cooked grains on hand (using the basic recipe below), and these meals will come together in 10 minutes for a nutrient-rich breakfast, lunch or dinner.

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The Chef’s Take: Quinoa Salad with Lemon and Chickpeas, Einat Admony

by in Chefs and Restaurants, March 12, 2014

quinoa

At the multiple Middle Eastern eateries Einat Admony owns in lower Manhattan — the restaurant Balaboosta as well as the Taïm falafel franchise — the chef pays homage to her upbringing with remarkable care. Not only does she skillfully prepare honest renditions of the fresh and flavorful cooking she grew up eating, but Admony makes sure her dishes are nourishing too. “I treat my customers the way I treat my kids,” she says, “which means giving them good proteins, whole grains and keeping a vegetable focus.”

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, January 29, 2014

fork close-up

In this week’s news: Yogurt discovers its savory side; scientists look into the problems of piling on the protein; and caramel coloring gets a red flag.

Takers for Tomato Yogurt?
Blue Hill Farm, annex of New York’s famed Blue Hill eateries, is making its mark on the yogurt scene. Instead of offering the conventional fruit-filled varieties, the high-end farm-to-fork establishment is spooning out concoctions that are 30 percent vegetable puree. The yogurts — made with dairy from grass-fed cows and selling in a small number of Whole Foods markets — are available in six flavors: tomato, carrot, beet, butternut squash, sweet potato and parsnip.

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