Tag: preventing weight gain

How to Combat Holiday Weight Gain

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, Healthy Holidays, December 7, 2016

Merry as they may be to many, for those of us who try to eat healthy and keep our weight under control, the holidays can be brutal. We step on the scale, cookie crumbs barely brushed from our lips, and watch as the pounds tick up into the danger zone. Ho-ho-how did this happen to us again this year?

Of course, we know how it happened. We made a few too many trips to the snack table, drank more eggnog than we knew was good for us and indulged a little too enthusiastically at family dinnertime. The good news is that it all tasted delicious and we enjoyed it in the company of family and friends. The bad news is that feeling festive as we eat those holiday delicacies doesn’t make them any less fattening — for proof, just look at Santa.

Sure, we’ll resolve to be better next year: “Lose weight and eat healthier” is penned in at the No. 1 spot on our New Year’s resolution lists every year. But what if we could do something to start the year without all the disadvantages of those holiday pounds?

Writing in the Washington Post, nutrition expert Jae Berman offers 11 (count them!) tips for keeping the pounds at bay over the holidays. Her suggestions include eating a small balanced meal before you go to a holiday gathering and eating your vegetables and drinking water once you’re there. Savor every bite, don’t drink too much alcohol, bring snacks in your bag to make sure you don’t get super hungry between meals (and then go crazy heaping your plate when dinner is served), she advises, and don’t forget to exercise.

Possibly Berman’s most-important piece of advice? Don’t beat yourself up for the moments you fall short. “Be kind to yourself and give yourself a break,” she writes. “Acknowledge the successes.” Read more

Why We Should Stop Fearing Fat

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, April 12, 2016

Fat has been demonized — by nutritionists, doctors and the Dietary Guidelines — for so long now that it’s hard to even remember a time when low- and no-fat foods weren’t all the rage. But one man is on a mission to change that attitude. Mark Hyman, M.D., director of the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Functional Medicine, is the author of Eat Fat, Get Thin (Little, Brown and Company, 2016). “For 35 years we’ve been told to eat low fat, but the result is that we’ve cut fat and eaten a ton of carbs and sugar,” he says, which accounts for the corresponding surge in obesity, diabetes and other related ills over the same time period.

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Should You Weigh Yourself Every Day?

by in Healthy Tips, January 6, 2016

Do you obsessively hop on the scale each morning to see how much weight you’ve lost or gained? Is this really giving you good information or just playing with your emotions? Find out how often you should weigh yourself and what the number on the scale really means.

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5 Ways to Prevent Summer Weight Gain in Children

by in Healthy Tips, July 6, 2014

ice pops
A Harvard University study released last month found that kids gain weight more quickly over the summer than during the school year. With the warm weather and more opportunities to play outdoors, one might think the opposite is true. But it turns out there are several factors at play.

The study, released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention journal Preventing Chronic Disease, compiled and analyzed the results of seven studies published since 1990. The studies were conducted among children ages 5 to 17. The researchers found that black, Hispanic and overweight children and adolescents were at highest risk of gaining weight quickly over the summer. The study determined that these adolescents gained weight because they spent more time in front of TV and computer screens and were more likely to eat unhealthy snacks. These children also may have slept less, as their summer days were less structured compared with those during the school year.

What Parents Can Do
There are several basic strategies that can help keep kids from gaining weight during summer vacation. Here are five.

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5 Super-Easy Ways to Cut Calories (Without Even Thinking)

by in Diets & Weight Loss, September 11, 2013

whole-wheat spaghetti with swiss chard
“The best diet is the one you don’t know you’re on.” Sage advice from Brian Wansink, Director of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University and author of Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think. Eating healthy doesn’t mean you must forsake all indulgences and subsist solely on oatmeal and salads. Instead, what if you just made a few small changes to your eating routine that could lead to gradual, sustainable results? Here are five tips to try when cooking and eating at home, inspired by Prof. Wansink’s good read.

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7 Reasons You’re Gaining Weight

by in Diets & Weight Loss, January 22, 2013

woman on scale
You’ve been trying so hard to shed pounds, but notice the scale tipping the other way. Before you toss your arms up in defeat, perhaps there are reasons why you’re gaining weight that you never thought of. My clients often tell me they’re sure they should be losing weight, but sometimes I point out the little things that really make a difference.

#1: Oil Overkill
Olive oil is a healthy fat—and so are some hyped-up expensive oils like grape seed and macadamia nut oil. Regardless of which type of oil you use, they all contain 120 calories per tablespoon. You need to be VERY careful about how much oil you’re cooking with or using in dressings and marinades.

Solve it: Aim for 1 to 2 teaspoons per person in one sitting to get your oil fix without going overboard.

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Make One Small Change: A Manageable Approach to Food, Fitness and Life

by in Healthy Tips, October 8, 2011
apple
Can one tiny change each day lead to big results?

The average adult gains about one pound per year. That doesn’t sound like much, right?  But now consider how someone who weighs 120 pounds at 20-years-old can reach 150 pounds around their 50th birthday. One pound a year. And when you break it down, one pound a year is about ten calories a day.

Ten calories a day? That’s like a little less butter spread on your bread! And not even one packet of sugar in your daily coffee!  These changes seem very easy, but the key is to make these changes every day, day after day. And that’s the challenging part: Consistency. Life happens: late days at work, stressful life events, traveling. The key is to find small changes that are easy for us, and not easily disrupted by life’s (sometimes necessary) distractions.

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