Tag: picky eaters

Negotiating with Picky Eaters

by in Cooking for Kids, November 23, 2014


When you’re a parent, the day often (read: always) involves multiple negotiations. Long-sleeve pink shirt versus new purple shirt: You push for the warm pink one, while she begs for the sparkly purple number. Brushing teeth versus just using mouthwash: You try to give a lesson in dental hygiene, while he sees how far he can stand from the sink and spit. Later you navigate the playground slide. You try to settle the debate over who is first in line for the slide and then explain why four at a time is a bad idea. Sometimes we feel like we are running a company boardroom, mediating and arbitrating deals instead of preschool playdates.

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7 Tips for Feeding Picky Kids

by in Kid-Friendly, June 28, 2012
picky eater
Will your child ever love spinach as much as you do?

Getting kids to eat healthy has become the Mount Everest of parenthood. Every day is a rocky, uphill battle with daily obstacles thwarting parents’ best intentions: bake sales, kiddie menus, birthday parties and vending machines are everywhere. It doesn’t help that kids are still wired like their early ancestors to gravitate towards sweet foods to maintain their weight in case of a famine and avoid unfamiliar foods that may be poisonous. Fast forward to the twenty-first century with easy access to store-bought processed products and introducing kids to cauliflower can sound as daunting as climbing a mountain.

The good news is that there are plenty of tactics to encourage healthier eating habits in kids.

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Food News: Food Presentation Affects Kids’ Eating Habits

by in Food News, January 29, 2012
pancake face
Could silly faces on a plate help feed picky eaters?

Kids may be picky eaters, but according to a new study from Cornell University, how food is presented to them makes a huge difference in the food they choose to eat.

Children crave a greater visual diversity on the plate, whether it’s varying colors or ingredients shaped into silly faces and designs.

According to the study, “On average, they [kids] preferred seven different items on their plates, and six different colors.”

Parents, however, found three items of different colors more appealing.

Could this trick allow for more nutrient-rich foods in kids’ diets?

Read the rest of the study. And get some fun plating ideas after the jump.

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