Tag: organic

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, July 19, 2014

cherries
In this week’s news: The organic set has a told-you-so moment; the calories-in-calories-out theory loses cachet; and the veggie burger seizes the gourmet spotlight.

Whole-Paycheck Prices? (Maybe) Just Worth It. 
Here’s a reason to feel good about that massively bank-breaking expensive pint of organic fruit you just bought: A new comprehensive review of previous studies found that organic produce and grains had slightly higher levels of antioxidants (17 percent more) and lower levels of pesticides than their conventionally-farmed counterparts. Previous reviews had played down the differences (pesticide levels in conventional produce, for example, are often still well below what’s considered harmful), and hadn’t used quite as broad a sample base (one possible reason for the difference).

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Annual “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen” Produce Lists Released

by in Food News, April 29, 2014

box of produce
Given the premium often charged for organic fruits and vegetables, many shoppers have asked themselves if that pricier bunch of kale or pint of tomatoes is really worth it. For those who want reduce their exposure to pesticides, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released its latest version of the Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce. Each year, the advocacy group measures pesticide residues on conventionally grown produce and ranks fruits and vegetables from “dirty” to “clean.”

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Healthy Debate: Should You Choose Organic?

by in Food News, January 3, 2013

organic produce
This topic just won’t seem to go away. Is it worth the extra cost to buy organic or does healthy conventionally grown food trump pesticide-free? It’s really not a black and white issue. To get to the bottom of things, you have to look closely at different types of food.

Defining Organic
An organic food is grown without the use of any chemicals, herbicides and pesticides. Such toxins are potentially detrimental to the nervous system and may also play a role in the development of cancer, hormone dysfunction and damage to tissues like the skin, lungs and eyes. It’s well understood that one serving of conventionally produced food won’t cause harm. The big question is whether or not long-term consumption is problematic.

Way back when, foods were simply organic or they weren’t. As more organic products have become available, the issue became more complex. To keep up with the variations, the USDA has designated specific nomenclature for organic foods. For example, a food labeled “100 percent organic” contains all organic ingredients; the “organic” designation means that all agricultural ingredients must be organic. Foods with 70 percent organic ingredients can only state that they’re “made with organic ingredients.” For the complete breakdown of organic labeling definitions, visit the USDA Organic Certification web page.

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EWG Update: The Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen

by in Food News, Food Safety, July 22, 2012

dirty dozen
The Environmental Working Group constantly scrutinizes the amounts of pesticide residues found on popular produce. We want to keep you updated on which fruits and veggies you should buy organic – here’s a review of the 2012 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticide Residues.

The Dirty Dozen PLUS
The top 12 most contaminated had remained relatively consistent other than a few items shifting positions. But in 2012 a “PLUS” category was added to the original dozen. Conventionally-grown green beans, kale and collard greens have been given special consideration because of an especially dangerous toxin they are treated with. Organophosphate insecticides are toxic to the neurological system and are found in even higher amounts on bell peppers and nectarines (numbers 3 and 6 on the Dirty Dozen list).

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Chicken: Good or Bad?

by in Food Safety, May 8, 2012

marinated chicken
Our recent post on 5 Healthiest Kids Meals stirred up controversy over chicken. Some folks felt that it’s loaded with artery-clogging saturated fat while others voiced their concern over how chickens are raised and fed. Here’s a breakdown of the good, the bad and the ugly.

Good?
Chicken is easy to prepare in a healthy way by grilling, roasting, sauteing, poaching, stir-frying and baking. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, we should be eating lean sources of protein, including chicken. It is recommended to remove the visible fat and skin from chicken before eating to decrease unnecessary calories from fat. Here is a comparison of 3-ounces of chicken breast with and without the skin:

Without the skin:
Calories: 142
Fat: 3 grams
Saturated Fat: 1 gram
Cholesterol: 73 milligrams
Protein: 27 grams

With the skin:
Calories: 193
Fat: 8 grams
Saturated Fat: 8 gram
Cholesterol: 82 milligrams
Protein: 29 grams

As with most meat and poultry, it can get expensive. The problem is, most folks eat much higher portions that they really need. Purchasing 3-4 ounces cooked (about 4-5 ounces raw) per person can help keep portions at bay and control costs.

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Better Food Choices: Making the Switch

by in Uncategorized, March 18, 2012
grocery bag
Start making healthier choices today.

Healthy eating can be defined in many ways and has different meanings for different people. But at the end of the day it’s about making small, simple, upgrades to your current diet to improve your overall health. That doesn’t mean you have to toss all the processed foods in your pantry today or say good-bye to your favorite sweets forever. It means starting where you are and using these tips to make healthier food choices moving forward.

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Update: Where Should You Spend Your Organic Dollar?

by in In Season, June 16, 2011
Organic Produce
Find out what fruits and veggies are most important to buy organic.

Sure, we’d probably all love to buy every fruit and veggie organic, but it’s not always affordable to purchase everything from the often higher-priced organic section.  Luckily, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) keeps a running list of the fruits and veggies that are most and least contaminated — here’s how they updated the list for 2011.

Find out the most important foods to buy organic »

The Most Important Fruits and Veggies to Buy Organic

by in Uncategorized, April 22, 2011

fresh produce

Last year on Earth Day, we introduced the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) Shoppers Guide to Pesticides – the list of most and least contaminated produce items to help you decide where to spend your organic food budget. The EWG continues to conduct research on contamination levels in popular fruits and veggies—here’s the latest update.

Get the details »

Why You Should Care About Genetically-Modified Alfalfa

by in Food News, March 11, 2011

sprouts

Agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack recently gave commercial alfalfa growers the green light to plant seeds genetically modified to resist the herbicide Roundup. This controversial decision has the food industry fighting, and with good reason. So, why should you care? Find out what’s been going on, and how it could affect organic produce and meats. Then, tell us where you stand on this issue.

Genetically-modified alfalfa: good or bad? »

Food Labeling: Beware the “Health” Halo

by in Grocery Shopping, Label Decoder, January 7, 2011

Food Labels

Many folks read food labels to gain better insight on the foods they choose. However, with so many claims plastered on labels, things can get really confusing. Even worse, food companies use these claims to push certain products and make you think they’re healthier than they really are. We’ve rounded up the top 10 food label boobie traps.

10 food label tricks »