Tag: olives

The Chef’s Take: Green Olive Tapenade from David Lebovitz

by in Chefs and Restaurants, August 20, 2014

olive tapenade
“When you cook at home, you know exactly what is going into the food you’re eating,” says David Lebovitz, who has been cooking and baking for most of his life — much of it in restaurants. He spent nearly thirteen years at Chez Panisse, working with Alice Waters and pastry chef Lindsey Shere, who became his mentor. He left the famed Berkeley restaurant in 1999 to coincide with the release of his first book, Room for Dessert. And five years later, he moved to Paris with little more than a cast-iron skillet and one French phrase: pain au chocolat.

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10 Uses for Olives of All Kinds

by in Robin's Healthy Take, October 28, 2013

olives

When it comes to phytonutrients (plant nutrients), olives offer powerful antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties, some of which are unique to olives themselves. For example, olives contain hydroxytyrosol, a phytonutrient that may help stave off cancer and bone loss. Also in olives’ favor: Almost three-quarters of olives’ fat is oleic acid, a heart-healthy, monounsaturated fatty acid. Olives contain linoleic acid (another essential fatty acid) and alpha-linolenic acid (an Omega-3 fatty acid). This high concentration of “good” fat means olives may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and help decrease blood pressure. Studies show that olives may also provide health benefits to much of the rest of the body, including the respiratory, nervous, immune, inflammatory and digestive systems. Ready incorporate olives into your menus? Here are 10 great ways.

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Why We Love Olives

by in Why We Love, September 28, 2012

olives
My friends and family can attest that olives are one of my all-time favorite foods. I heart olives in my morning omelet, chopped into my Israeli-Style Salad and when sipping on a cold brew. There’s no wrong time to munch on this salty, briny fruit.

Olive Facts
Olives date back to biblical times where the olive branch was a symbol of peace. These gems were thought to have originated in the Mediterranean, tropical and central Asia and several parts of Africa. Olive trees were first seen in California in the late 1700s.

Olives grow on trees, have one pit in the center, and contain oil in their flesh. In order to extract their oil the olives must be pressed. The difference between a green and black olive is their degree of ripeness: black olives are the most ripe. Fresh olives picked right off the tree are inedible and must be prepared with brine, salt or cured in olive oil before being consumed.

Some of the most popular varieties include Manzanillo, Mission, Rubra, Sevillano and Gordal. Mission is most commonly used for cold-pressed olive oil from California and Gordal is a very popular table olive from Spain.

Today, over 90% of the world’s olive oil production comes from Spain, Italy, Tunisia, Turkey, Greece, Syria, Morocco and Portugal.

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Aisle by Aisle: What To Do at the Deli Counter

by in Grocery Shopping, Healthy Tips, August 3, 2009

deli case by Jackson Chu
To help make for healthier supermarket trips, we’ve filled you in on dos and don’ts for breads, cereals, dairy, bakery goods and frozen foods. Now we’re exploring the best choices when you roll your cart up to the deli counter.

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5 Ingredients: Pasta With Anchovies, Olives & Spinach

by in 5-Ingredient Recipes, May 14, 2009

You may have caught the new show on Food Network — 5 Ingredient Fix. Host Claire Robinson preps full meals from just a few ingredients. Inspired by the idea, we wanted to try creating our own healthy dish created with some simple pantry staples. For this first try, we’re building around simple whole-wheat pasta.

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Spotlight Recipe: Mediterranean Tuna Wrap

by in Healthy Recipes, January 19, 2009

Mediterranean Tuna Wrap
Fruity kalamata olives and olive oil give this tuna tons of flavor (you won’t miss the mayo). Parsley and lemon juice add the perfect amount of freshness. Better still, it’s made with chunk light tuna, which is low in mercury.

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