Tag: nuts

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 11, 2013

nuts
In this week’s news: Why we should get cracking (nuts, that is); signs that diet soda is fizzling out (or would that be fizzing out?); and the true cost of healthy eating.

Pass the Cocktail Nuts
A recent study in The New England Journal of Medicine (and reported by the New York Times) looked at data from over 119,000 women and men in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Researchers found that study participants who ate nuts seven or more times a week had a 20% lower death rate than those who didn’t eat nuts over the same period of time. Even for those who only ate nuts less than once a week, the death rate was 11% lower. Participants ate a variety of nuts including pistachios, almonds, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts, cashews, pecans, pine nuts, peanuts, walnuts and macadamias.

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10 Everyday Uses for Nuts and Seeds

by in Healthy Tips, April 11, 2013

nuts and seeds
It’s no secret that nuts and seeds are good for us. Packed with anti-inflammatory fats, protein and nutrients galore, nuts and seeds make a great addition to a healthy daily diet. The problem is, snacking on a handful of nuts everyday or adding a tablespoon of flax to your smoothie can get old really fast. Here are a few easy ways to make nuts and seeds a part of your every without the boredom of that bowlful of almonds on your desk.

Replace Eggs: Use 1 tablespoon finely ground chia seeds or flax seeds (grind them dry in a blender, food processor or coffee grinder) with 3 tablespoons of water. This ratio will replace one egg.

Thicken Soups and Stews: Add a couple tablespoons of ground or whole chia seeds to a hot soup or stew until you reach your desired thickness. Wait 10-15 minutes for chia to thicken to full capacity.
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Nut Allergy 101

by in Robin's Healthy Take, February 10, 2013

nut allergy
When you’re allergic to peanuts or tree nuts, even a small amount can cause a severe allergic reaction. Peanuts aren’t true nuts (they’re a legume, just like beans and lentils), but their protein structure is similar to tree nuts and they’re one of the most common food allergens. And because the protein structure is similar, folks allergic to peanuts are often allergic to tree nuts, such as almonds, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, filberts, pine nuts, pistachios, cashews and Brazil nuts.

Allergic reactions occur when the nut protein alerts the body’s immune system to protect itself; it does so by releasing chemicals like histamine. These chemicals cause symptoms that vary from person to person, but typically include wheezing and coughing, problems breathing, anaphylaxis, throat tightness, stomach cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, itchy, watery and/or swollen eyes, hives and a drop in blood pressure. One person can actually react to the same food differently at different times.

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Nuts About Pecans

by in Healthy Recipes, November 29, 2012

pecans
Buttery, crunchy, plus full of flavor and healthy fats — so many reasons to go nuts over pecans!

Pecan Basics
Dating back to the 16th century, pecans are the only tree nut native to North America. The name “pecan” comes from the Native American term used to explain “nuts requiring a stone to crack.”

Wide-scale propagation of this nut began in the late 1880s and today 80 percent of the world’s crop is grown in southern states like Texas, Louisiana and Georgia. The National Pecan Shellers Association list of fun facts includes that it would take 144 million pecans to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool.

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Nuts About Cashews

by in Healthy Recipes, October 4, 2012

cashews
We’ve told you how nuts we are about walnuts, almonds, peanuts, and pistachios but let’s not forget about cashews.

Cashew Basics
These nuts are thought to have originated in northeast Brazil. The kidney-shaped, gray-brown colored cashew nut grows from the bottom of a fleshy stalk that resembles the shape of a pear (though is referred to as the cashew apple). The cashew apple has a bright yellow or red skin and is between 5 to 10 centimeters long. The cashew shell is toxic, that’s why you can only purchase them shelled. Cashews have a distinct sweet, buttery flavor.

Today cashews are primarily produced in India, Brazil, Vietnam and Mozambique. Juice, syrup, preserves, wine and liquor are produced from the cashew apple, though the nut is the main form sold commercially in the U.S.

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Nut-Free Lunch Options

by in Back to School, September 11, 2012

kitchen sink cookies
Nowadays, making classrooms or school lunch tables “nut free” is necessary to keep kiddies with allergies safe. Whether you have a little one with an allergy or kiddos that attend an allergy-sensitive school, here are some delicious replacements for typically nut-inspired foods.

1.) Cream Cheese and Jelly
This classic sandwich is an oldie but goodie. Make it extra special with homemade jam.

2.) Soy Nut Butter
A tasty alternative for dipping apple slices, carrot sticks or with jelly on whole-grain bread.

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New Study Reveals Fewer Calories in Almonds

by in Food News, August 30, 2012

almonds
Calling all almond lovers! A new study found that almonds have fewer calories than originally thought. We’ve got the inside scoop on this news.

The Study
A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that almonds have 20% fewer calories than originally thought. The results found that a one-ounce serving of almonds (about 23 nuts) has 129 calories as opposed to 160 that’s currently listed on the Nutrition Facts Panel.

Interestingly, it has nothing to do with the composition of the almond—rather, the way we metabolize it. Although it sounds nutty (pun intended), I had the pleasure to speak with Jenny Heap, MS, RD Manager, Healthy Professional Marketing for Almond Board of California to help decipher these findings.

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Nuts About Pistachios

by in Healthy Recipes, February 8, 2012
pistachios
Pistachios are wonderful on their own, but they make a great appetizer when drizzled with honey and served with apples and cheese.

No other nut boasts an emerald hue like the pistachio does. Find out what you’re getting when you crack open a pistachio.

Pistachio Basics
Commonly grown in Turkey and Iran, 98 perecent of the American crop of pistachios is grown in California. You can spot these distinctive nuts by their tan outer shell and the small green nut peaking out (the shell splits open when the nuts are ripe). Pistachios are available shelled or unshelled, salted or unsalted. Some research suggests that shelled nuts are a better choice for portion control– having to pop open the shell slows you down when munching.

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Top 10 Foods That Fill You Up

by in Healthy Tips, January 11, 2012
nuts
Nuts are a high-protein snack that will keep you feeling full.

Do you find yourself hungry 30 minutes after eating? Certain foods can help keep you satisfied so you avoid mindlessly munching throughout the day. Add these 10 filling foods to your daily repertoire.

#1: Oatmeal
A bowl of warming oatmeal can help jump-start a cold winter day and keep you satisfied, thanks to all that fiber.

Recipe: Apple Harvest Oatmeal

#2: Cottage Cheese
This underappreciated food has a perfect balance of fat, carbs and protein. You can count on the combo of protein and fat to help fill you up. Top ½ cup of low fat cottage cheese with fresh fruit or granola or use cottage in dip, quick bread, or pancake recipes.

Recipe: Cottage Cheese Biscuits

#3: Nuts
Pistachios, pecans, almonds, walnuts, or cashews— nuts contain healthy unsaturated fat combined with protein to help keep you satisfied. With an average of 7 calories per nut, a small handful (about an ounce) makes a great snack.

Recipe: Almond Lover Trail Mix

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12 Days of Holiday Gifts: Chocolate Covered Pretzel Sticks

by in 12 Days of Holiday Gifts, December 1, 2011

pretzel sticks

We’re kicking off the holiday season with 12 Days of Holiday Gifts — gifts that are both homemade and gifts you can buy at the store for your loved ones this season. Day 1: Chocolate-Dipped Pretzel Sticks that you can make with your kids.

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