Tag: nutrition experts

Diet 101: Whole30

by in Diets, Food & Nutrition Experts, January 26, 2017

As a registered dietitian, I’ve got a healthy skepticism towards most diets. Being in private practice for almost a decade will do that to you. I’ve seen clients come in on just about every eating pattern imaginable, from raw-food to paleo and everything in between. With the growing popularity of Whole30, I set out to examine the basics of the diet and nutritional truths behind some of the claims.

 

What is Whole30?

Whole30 is an elimination diet, with shares a similar philosophy with the Paleo trend. Both recommend eating lots of fresh, high-quality foods while ditching anything processed. Specifically, you are removing all grains, dairy, soy, legumes, sugar, certain preservatives and artificial sweeteners from your diet. According to the authors, Melissa and Dallas Hartwig, these foods have been linked to hormonal imbalance, systemic inflammation, gut issues and more, though most of those claims aren’t backed by evidence-based research. Ideally, Whole30 is to be done strictly for 30 days; afterwards you can gently add back in said foods to see how your body responds.

 

Mindful eating

In addition to the diet recommendations, Whole30 encourages no calorie counting, measuring or weighing yourself for the entire 30-day process. Instead, the program focuses on non-scale victories, like improved sleep, skin, energy and overall feeling. The program isn’t promoted to be a long-term diet, but instead a reset button to focus on whole-foods that nourish your body.

As a long-time student of intuitive eating, I’m a big fan of switching the focus to non-scale victories and removing the added pressure of specific numbers and goals. For most dieters, these are big detractors and can often feel like punishment rather than an empowered choice. However, one of the tenets of intuitiveness is allowing yourself to eat whatever you want, without any parameters in place. Whole30 can fit this mindset if you are truly enjoying the foods you are eating and don’t feel deprived, but it’s not an automatic switch to mindful eating. Read more

Strategies for Keeping Your New Year’s Resolutions

by in Diets, Fitness & Wellness, January 25, 2017

We swear off pizza, ditch the cookies and vow to exercise every day. But research shows that this is the time of year when we start backsliding on our resolutions. In fact according to polling, more than 20% of us aim to lose weight and eat better in 2017, but less than 10 percent actually succeed. Here are 5 practical strategies to help you keep your resolutions and reach your goals.

 

Set (small) goals

Stay motivated by setting and accomplishing weekly or even daily goals. Have one less cup of coffee, go an extra half mile on the treadmill or add an extra serving of fruit to your daily diet. Establish some foundational habits you can build on as time goes by.

 

Splurge…occasionally

Dramatic changes almost never last, and giving up on foods you absolutely love typically just breeds resentment. Allow yourself to indulge in a not-so healthy food or beverage from time to time – not depriving yourself completely will set the stage for long-term success. Read more

Trend Alert: Pea Protein

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, Food News & Trends, January 2, 2017

Proteins derived from plants are getting more recognition as many folks strive to have a more plant-based diet. At the forefront of this trend is protein from legumes like peas. Find out if the newfound popularity is worth the hype.

 

Peas As a Protein Source

One cup of raw green peas contains 8 grams of protein. Yellow or green split peas are also often used for pea-based products; this dried version contains 48 grams in the same 1 cup portion. Depending on the product, you might find either of these options added so check ingredient lists for clarification.

The type of protein found in peas is different than animal derived sources. As with most plant-based foods, some amino acids are missing, but peas do contain three important muscle building “branched chain” amino acids, leulcine, isoleucine and valine.

Pea protein powder has become a popular additive in snack foods and bars. Extracting the protein from food to powder does require some processing so the nutrient profile will differ slightly from the whole food version. Pea protein does have an advantage compared to some other popular protein supplements (like whey or casein) as it contains more hunger fighting fiber.

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Sneaky Ways to Get Vitamin D

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, November 9, 2016

During this overcast time of year, the sunshine vitamin isn’t so easy to get. Adults need 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D daily. But many Americans (specifically, 3 percent of non-Hispanic whites, 12 percent of Mexican-Americans and 31 percent of non-Hispanic blacks) aren’t getting enough, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vitamin D is important for muscle and bone strength, immunity and more — and come July 2018, a food’s vitamin D content will be listed on its label. Until then, this handy guide to food sources will help you get your daily requirement.

1 egg (41 IU): Earlier this year, the new 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans gave us clearance to eat the whole egg, waving away concerns that the cholesterol in the yolk affects blood levels of cholesterol. So it’s good news that an egg’s vitamin D is in the yolk: A large egg contains about 7 percent of your daily need.

1 cup cremini mushrooms (3 IU): This amount will increase a lot, to 1,110 IU, when the mushrooms are grown while exposed to ultraviolet rays. UV-grown shrooms are usually listed as such on the label. Read more

9 Foods Nutrition Experts Are Embarrassed to Have in Their Pantry

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, July 10, 2016

Even nutrition experts have foods they’re embarrassed about stashed in their pantry! I asked specialists around the country which secret foods they have in their house — you’ll be surprised at what they had to say.

Sugar-Sweetened Cereal
“[When I was] growing up my parents didn’t buy the high-sugar cereal, and I always wanted it. My best friend always had Fruity Pebbles at his house, and I loved going over there just to get to eat them. Now as an adult I still really like them and keep them in my pantry for late-night dessert. I always feel guilty buying them, but I absolutely love eating them.”

— Wesley Delbridge, R.D., Food & Nutrition Director for the Chandler Unified School District in Arizona

Boxed Muffin Mix
“Although I truly love baking mostly from scratch, every once in a while I’ll find a boxed bread or muffin mix at Trader Joe’s that I get excited about trying. I don’t use baking mixes very regularly, but with how quickly they come together, I completely understand the appeal!”

McKenzie Hall Jones, RDN, of Nourish RDs Read more

“Should I Scoop Out My Bagel?” and Other Nutrition Myths Debunked

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, April 4, 2016

When I was asked to endorse the book Should I Scoop Out My Bagel? I was hesitant at first. I couldn’t believe that co-authors Ilyse Schapiro, M.S., R.D., CDN, and Hallie Rich could come up with close to 100 nutrition and fitness myths. After reviewing it, I was pleasantly surprised by their answers to all the common nutrition myths I’ve been hearing for years! I recently spoke with Ilyse and Hallie about their newly released book and why there’s so much misinformation about nutrition out there.

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6 Holiday Indulgences Nutritionists Can’t Live Without

by in Healthy Tips, December 12, 2015

Sweet Potato Casserole
They may know a lot more about healthy eating than the rest of us, but it turns out that even those who talk nutrition for a living are still human when it comes to holiday treats. We polled six nutritionists to find out what they’re craving this holiday season — and how they plan to work those indulgences into their otherwise healthy diets.

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Talking with Samantha Heller, Author of The Only Cleanse: A 14-Day Natural Detox Plan to Jump-Start a Lifetime of Health

by in Cookbooks, November 30, 2015

Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., CDN, is a nutrition expert who truly gets it! I was very excited to contribute some of my recipes to her new book and even more excited to sit down and ask her some questions about the concept behind The Only Cleanse.

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Ask the Experts: Homemade Must-Haves

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, February 28, 2013

tomato sauce
Even though it would make life easier at times, I only enjoy homemade versions of certain kitchen basics. I’ve tried brands of store-bought applesauce and chicken stock but I’m never pleased. I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s just better (and often healthier) to make them from scratch. I posed this same issue — what ingredients MUST you have homemade — to registered dietitians (RDs) across the country and got an overwhelming number of responses. A HUGE thanks to all the RDs that weighed in on this hot topic.

Homemade Must Have #1: Salad Dressing
This was far and away the biggest pet peeve among nutrition pros – nobody cares for all the extra sugar, salt and other processed ingredients swimming in bottled salad dressings.

Janet Helm, MS, RD, blogger at Nutrition Unplugged, author of The Food Lover’s Healthy Habits Cookbook speaks for many of us when she says:

“I just can’t bring myself to buy any bottled salad dressings. It’s just so easy to make your own vinaigrette, which will always taste better and fresher. Plus, you can control the ingredients when you make your own.”

Barbara Boyce, DHSc, RD, LDN gives her homemade dressing a kick:

“My favorite is a jalapeno ranch dressing with a lot less fat and salt than store-bought. My husband and I like ranch dressing with a zip to it, so I add jalapeno peppers to the mix.”

Christine M. Palumbo, MBA, RD adjunct faculty member at Benedictine University opts for the simplest of dressings:

“I can’t stand 99% of the commercial bottled dressings or those served in restaurants. They tend to be sweetened and have a cloying “chemical” taste. No, thank you. My homemade saves money and tastes better. It’s a simple blend of extra virgin olive oil, red wine vinegar, salt, freshly ground black pepper, and dried oregano.”

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