Tag: new years resolution

Countdown to New Year’s: No-Resolutions Resolution Week 5

by in Healthy Holidays, December 15, 2014

Grocery Shopping
We’re in the home stretch of our No-Resolutions Resolution plan. Have you followed our tips for smart snacking? Found a way to keep your exercise goals in check? Keep up the good work! This week, we’re tackling the grocery store. What to pick up and what to leave on the shelf!

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Reset Your Resolution

by in Healthy Tips, March 2, 2013

new years resolution
We’re more than a few weeks into the New Year — have you kept up with your resolution?  If not, no need to feel guilty and sabotage future health goals. Unattainable health goals only lead to a sense of failure which in turn becomes lack of motivation and you are right back where you started. Instead, set one or two small goals you know you can stick with. You can always add a few more throughout the year. Setting attainable goals will keep you motivated and feeling positive about the lifestyle choices you have made.  hese healthy resolutions are the perfect way to make health upgrades to your lifestyle any time of year. So even if you haven’t made good on your original resolution, pick up one (or several) of these and make 2013 a healthy year.

  1. Ditch Processed Foods: Assess your cabinets and gradually rid yourself of one processed food a month or a week if you are very motivated. Make small changes like switching from canned to frozen vegetables or a microwave dinner to a meal you’re cooked at home.
  2. Hydrate: Most of us do not drink enough water or even worse, we’re drinking caloric beverages instead. Add one glass of water to your daily routine. It’s that simple.
  3. Eat Breakfast:  The old saying, “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” exists for a reason. Challenge yourself to start the day off right and eat a healthy breakfast. It can be as simple as yogurt and fruit or an English muffin with almond butter. Read more

5 Signs You’ll Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions

by in Small Steps, January 16, 2013

calendar

The new year brings New Year’s resolutions. If you’re making the same ones year after year and they’re not sticking, it’s time to rethink your strategy. But if you’ve been successful so far, these 5 signs will let you know that the resolution you made this year is a promise you can keep.

#1: You Made a Specific Resolution
In order to become healthier, you want to make specific and achievable short-term goals. These goals become habits over time. Instead of making a resolution that you’ll lose 50 pounds this year, make a more specific goal on how you will achieve it. Some specific goals include:

  • I will eat 5 servings of vegetables 3 days a week.
  • I will go to Zumba class twice every week.
  • I will switch from white to brown rice.
  • I will make time for breakfast every day.

Here are more examples of small goals that pave the way to bigger changes.

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One Small Change: Eat Healthier All Year Long by Changing Your Food Environment

by in Healthy Tips, January 26, 2012
sandwich police
Keep tempting foods out of reach.

It’s nearly the end of January and maybe you’ve joined our Healthy Every Week January Challenge, maybe you’ve done your own resolution-thing this year. Regardless, the new year often brings a surge of renewal and positive change. We toss out all of the leftover holiday junk food around the house (or in the case of my cousin, offer leftovers to guests as they leave the New Years’ party). We are determined to choose the grilled chicken salad over the two slices of pizza at lunch and turn down dessert when we go out to dinner. We buy lots of fresh groceries on January 2nd and whip up great home-cooked meals, such as lentil soup and baked salmon.

For the first couple of weeks, life is good. We feel better and start to look better too! Then we go back to our old routines at work, with our families and in our day-to-day lives. As a result, our eating and exercise habits often go back to the old routines too. We (and our bodies) are the result of our habits and routines. The biggest challenge for most people is harnessing the momentum and enthusiasm from the first few weeks of January and taking steps to make sure some of those initial changes in January become permanent habits by February.

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