Tag: greek yogurt

Grab-and-Go Sport Snacks

by in Healthy Tips, October 18, 2014

trail mix
Being a recreational athlete means you take your sport and training seriously, but you have other priorities as well, such as work, family, and friends. Multiple demands can create a hectic schedule, and result in imperfect fueling choices for training – from heavy, fat laden snacks to eating nothing at all. Thankfully, there are a number of easy grab-and-go food options that you can pack with you at the beginning of the day that can keep you fueled anytime your training happens.

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A Creamy Broccoli Dip That’s a Healthy Winner

by in Scaling Back on Sodium, September 20, 2014

creamy broccoli dip
Fall not only means the start of football season — it also means the start of many Sunday meals getting replaced by chips and dip, salty bar snacks and microwave finger foods. But filling up while watching your favorite team doesn’t have to be a losing situation for your health. Nor does it have to keep you limited to raw vegetables from the crudites platter.

This year, replace high-sodium, store-bought spreads with a dip of your own creation — one that’s just as creamy and craveable and also a fun makeover of classic ranch dressing and vegetables.

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What to Look for on a Yogurt Label

by in Label Decoder, July 24, 2014

yogurt
The yogurt section in the dairy aisle has been expanding rapidly, with more spins on the creamy delight than you can shake a spoon at. The next time you’re adding yogurt to your shopping cart, here are some things to keep in mind as you scan the label.

Added Sugar
All yogurts contain sugar. Yogurt is made from milk, which contains lactose, a natural sugar found in milk. It’s the added sugar — what the yogurt manufacturer brings to the mix — that buyers need to watch out for. Fruit-flavored yogurt and honey-flavored yogurt have more sugar than plain because of added sugars. If you read the ingredient list, you will see words like fructose and evaporated cane sugar, both of which are simply different names for sugar. A good rule of thumb: If a yogurt contains more than 20 grams of sugar per serving, it’s more of a dessert than a healthful snack.

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Three Cheers For the Healthiest Berry Desserts

by in In Season, July 5, 2014

raspberry sherbet

Independence Day may be over, but the summer berry season is just hitting its stride. If your kitchen is bursting with all kinds of juicy gems, here’s a collection of red and blue berry desserts fit for any summer celebration.

Raspberries
Super-high in fiber (one cup provides more than 30 percent of the daily recommended value), these delicate berries can be found in various shades — including red white, black and purple — at farmers markets. Make homemade sherbet better than anything out of the freezer aisle or layer raspberries with other summer fruits in a cool and colorful terrine.

Raspberry-Buttermilk Sherbet (above, from Food Network Magazine)

Raspberry-Watermelon Terrine with Blueberry Sauce
summer fruit terrine

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When It Comes to Greek Yogurt, Thinking Outside the Bowl

by in Cookbooks, May 8, 2014

greek yogurt

Cookbook author Toby Amidor is a registered dietitian, a mother of three and a regular contributor to Healthy Eats — which might just be some kind of nutrition intelligence trifecta. She has long been a fan of Greek yogurt, not only for the flavor but also for the numerous dietary benefits it bestows. Her passion for the tangy ingredient inspired a compilation of over 130 delectable recipes, The Greek Yogurt Kitchen, out this week. Here, she talks about why Greek yogurt has a range that exceeds the usual parfaits and smoothies — although those, of course, are always great too.

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5 Game-Changing Ways to Use Greek Yogurt

by in Healthy Recipes, March 10, 2014

onion dip
If you thought yogurt was just a vehicle for fruit and granola, this may rock your world: The cool, creamy stuff is actually incredibly versatile and can be used in everything from sweets to salads. So think beyond the breakfast bowl and go way past the parfait: These innovative ideas will project Greek yogurt into a whole new stratosphere of wonderful.

Greek Yogurt Onion Dip (above)
Why should sour cream and mayonnaise have all the fun? Swap both ingredients for Greek yogurt: It’s the perfect consistency for a creamy dip to serve with crudites (or, okay, the occasional potato chip).

Greek Yogurt Cheesecake
Rich, tangy cheesecake and rich, tangy Greek yogurt have a lot in common. So, it’s only natural to use the yogurt as a main ingredient in this lightened-up cheesecake recipe. (Pssst … there’s an unexpected ingredient in the crust, too.) Read more

The Healthy Eats Q & A: Olympic Medalist Hannah Kearney

by in Healthy Tips, February 22, 2014

Hannah Kearney
So just how do those Olympic athletes fuel the demands of their sport? Freestyle skier Hannah Kearney, who won a bronze medal in Sochi, gave Healthy Eats a few insights into how she eats to compete. Perhaps not so surprisingly, the Chobani-sponsored athlete enjoys getting her Greek yogurt on — but there a few other ingredients that win a spot at the snack podium.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, January 15, 2014

greek yogurt
In this week’s nutrition news: Students and politicians embrace Greek yogurt; avocado enthusiasts have more reasons to rejoice; and caffeine generates buzz in a study on memory.

Greek Yogurt to Hit Cafeteria Trays?
A 3-month federal program conducted in four states attempted to gauge students’ interest in Greek yogurt as a protein source in school lunches. During the pilot program, students scarfed down approximately 200,000 pounds of the thick yogurt, prompting politicians to push for an expansion of the test. (The program’s proponents include Senator Charles E. Schumer of New York — home of Greek yogurt giant Chobani.)

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16 More Reasons to Heart Greek Yogurt

by in Robin's Healthy Take, July 11, 2013

Greek yogurt
Yes, Greek yogurt makes an awesome breakfast, a fabulous snack and a protein-packed dessert. But don’t relegate it to just those uses: This yogurt is capable of so much more!

First, the nutritional stats: When compared to most regular yogurt, Greek yogurt has 2 times the amount of protein. In fact, 1 cup has as much protein as 3 ounces of chicken. It’s also rich in calcium (important for strong bones and teeth and a healthy heart and nervous system). Lastly, Greek yogurt is rich in probiotics, which improve digestive health by maintaining levels of “good” bacteria in the gut (make sure the label says “active cultures”).

Because 1 cup of fat-free Greek yogurt has just 120 calories and 0 grams of fat, it offers an excellent way to slim down recipes while adding tang. Even whole-milk Greek yogurt has just 190 calories and 9 grams of fat per cup (compare that to 1 cup of regular sour cream with 492 calories and 48 grams of fat).

Here are 16 healthy ways to make the most of it.

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7 Secret-Weapon Foods for Weight Loss

by in Diets & Weight Loss, Healthy Tips, June 24, 2013

shrimp
Don’t waste your money on secret potions and potentially dangerous supplements to lose weight. Instead, include these real foods in your diet to help trim your waistline.

#1: Popcorn
Did you know popcorn is a whole grain? One cup of air-popped popcorn has between 30 to 55 calories and 5% of your recommended daily dose of hunger shielding fiber. Snack on 2 cups with a sprinkle of Parmesan cheese or 1 tablespoon of whipped butter with ¼ teaspoon sea salt. You can also make your own in the microwave in a flash.

Recipe: Chocolate-Orange Brown Butter Flavored Popcorn

#2: Greek Yogurt
With more protein than traditional yogurt per ounce, nonfat plain Greek yogurt can fill you up so you’ll be less likely to mindlessly snack. Not sure which brand to choose? Check how popular brands fared in Dana’s taste test.

Recipe: Fruit Salad with Limoncello and Greek Yogurt

#3: Shrimp
These crustaceans pack a protein punch for very few calories. One ounce (4 large shrimp) has 30 calories, 6 grams of protein and has minimal fat.  Shrimp is also a good source of vitamin D and selenium and even contains several energy-boosting B-vitamins. If you’re allergic to shellfish or just don’t care for shrimp, choose skinless, boneless chicken breast which has 46 calories, 9 grams of protein and 1 gram of fat per ounce.

Recipe: Robin’s Coconut Shrimp

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