Tag: fruit

5 Ways to Fire Up Fruit This Summer

by in Healthy Recipes, June 15, 2014

grilled plums

Feasting on fresh fruit is always a summertime ritual, but try roasting some of that just-plucked bounty or throwing it onto the grill until it’s nice and charred. Intense heat adds rich new layers of flavor, deepening and caramelizing sugars. With these vibrant recipes, there’s more incentive to keep the grill’s flames going, long after the turkey burgers have been demolished.

Grilled Plums with Spiced Walnut Yogurt Sauce (above)
Forgo that everyday berry parfait, and spring for this juicy plum dish instead. The fruit is draped in Greek yogurt that is brightened with honey, orange juice and grated orange zest — and warmed by cinnamon and toasted walnuts.

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How to Eat a Rainbow (Even in Winter)

by in Cookbooks, January 17, 2014

rainbow cookbook
We’ve all heard that half of our plates should be filled with colorful fruits and vegetables at every meal. But is eating a rainbow of recipes possible all of the time, even in the dead of winter? (And can you really get picky youngsters to eat a spectrum of produce?) Frances Largeman-Roth, RD, author of Eating in Color: Delicious, Healthy Recipes for You and Your Family, shares some tips from her new cookbook.

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Juicing: Myths vs. Facts

by in Diets & Weight Loss, Healthy Tips, August 23, 2013

juice
The juicing craze is still going strong, but many folks are still doing it for all of the wrong reasons. If you love juicing, make sure you’ve got the facts.

Myth: Juicing helps you lose weight
Fact: Although fruits and vegetables are relatively low in calories and have plenty of vitamins and antioxidants, too much of anything can pack on the pounds. Each ½ cup of fruit has about 60 calories. Juicing 4 to 5 cups of fruit comes out to 480 to 600 calories in one serving. If you’re trying to lose weight while juicing, portions still matter. Furthermore, diets that advocate juicing alone aren’t balanced (where’s the protein?) and are often dangerously low in calories overall.

Myth: Juicing is a way to cleanse your body
Fact: Your liver and kidneys were created to detoxify and naturally cleanse your body. Juicing or taking special concoctions won’t do a better job and there is no scientific evidence proving otherwise.

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How Much Fruit Should You Eat?

by in Grocery Shopping, Label Decoder, February 14, 2013

blueberries
The serving size for any food isn’t “one size fits all.” It depends on numerous factors like the food group, shape and nutrients provided. I’ll layout your standard fruit serving sizes and delve into the nitty-gritty details of some not-so-traditional foods (like those squeezable fruit pouches) so you’ll know what one serving of fruit actually is.

The Recommendations
According to the USDA’s MyPlate, any fruit or 100% fruit juice can make up a serving of fruit. Fresh, canned, frozen, freeze-dried, dried, whole, cut up and pureed fruit all count. How much fruit you need each day varies by gender, age, and level of physical activity. Here are the guidelines for men and women ages 19 and older:

Women:

  • 19 to 30 years: 2 cups
  • 31 years and older: 1 ½ cups

Men:

  • 19 years and older: 2 cups

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Study Reveals: Fresh Fruit is the Number One Snack Choice

by in Food News, February 5, 2013

fresh fruit
The NPD Group, an Illinois-based market research firm, recently released a study showing that fresh fruit is America’s top choice for snacking – more so than any other sweet or savory option. According to the report, fresh fruit is eaten 55 times per capita each year as a snack, with chocolate following in second place at 45 times, and potato chips in third place at 30 times. Nuts and cookies are eaten, respectively, 27 and 22 times per year by the average US consumer, while crackers, yogurt, ice cream, and others tie at 17 times.

The report found that individuals with healthier overall diets snack between meals, and that their snack choices tend to be healthier ones. The study also showed that snacking now makes up 20% of all eating occasions in this country, with mid-morning snacking showing the most explosive growth.

Apples, oranges, and bananas by themselves are great snacks and very portable; they can also easily be made more substantial with the addition of a few heart-healthy nuts or a spoonful of peanut or almond butter. Try choosing a piece of fruit next time you’re craving a sweet treat between meals in order to increase your fruit intake and improve your health.

TELL US: How often do you choose fruit as a snack?

How to Get Rid of Fruit Flies

by in Food Safety, September 2, 2012

bananas in bowl
Do pesky fruit flies hover around your fresh produce? Find out how you can get them out of your kitchen.

Fruit Flies 101
Adult fruit flies (Drosiphila melanogaster) range in size from 1 to 2 millimeters, have red eyes and tan or brownish body. They like to lay their eggs on fruit that’s getting ready to be harvested; that’s how they make it into your home, though they can come in through open doors and windows. Once in your home, these small flies will hang out near rotting fruit, especially old bananas hanging out on your counter. These flies reproduce quickly—they can lay up to 500 eggs over the course of their 1-week lifespan.

Other common breeding grounds for these bugs include decaying meat, large spills of sugary soda or alcohol, sink drains, garbage disposals, empty bottles and cans, trash receptacles, wet mops and dirty rags.

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Produce Safety 101

by in Food Safety, August 7, 2012

washing peppers
You know you should be eating your fruits and veggies. But it’s just as important to your health to make sure your produce is clean and free of harmful pathogens. Luckily, there are simple tips you can follow to keep you and your loved ones safe.

Foods Involved
The culprits include raw fruits and veggies and fresh juices made from them. Choosing organic or sticking to the clean 15 can help decrease the amount of pesticides in your produce but it won’t change the possibility that harmful microorganisms may be present.

At the Store
Whether you’re buying from your local supermarket, farmers’ market or belong to a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) keep these tips in mind:

  • Purchase in-season fruits and veggies, especially in the summer when so much is available.
  • If you’re heading to your local farmers’ market, go early! You don’t want to buy fruits and veggies that have been sitting out in the heat for many hours or that have been touched by lots of people.
  • Buy only what you need for the week. You’re better off making several quick trips to the market rather than stocking up and risking having the excess go bad.
  • Choose produce carefully. Look for signs on spoilage such as mold, bruises, mushiness or cuts.
  • Instead of buying pre-packaged produce, choose loose produce. It gives you a better opportunity to check for signs of spoilage.
  • When buying fresh juice, be sure it’s pasteurized (treated with heat to kill harmful germs). If you’re not sure, ask or don’t buy it. Remember, young kids, pregnant and lactating women, older adults and those with a compromised immune system should lay off unpasteurized juices.
  • If you’re bagging your produce in reusable bags, be sure to wash the bags regularly.

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Unforgettable Fruit Salads

by in Healthy Recipes, July 6, 2012

fruit salad
We’ve all been there. After slaving away over a sticky cutting board, cutting pear after strawberry after apple, the fruit salad of our dreams is left with the dregs of cantaloupe and honeydew stranded in the bowl, never to grace a plate. Each fruit was squeezed and sized up in the grocery store, sure, but the typical fruit salad is rather uniform and expected. We know what it’s going to taste like before we even load up our plates.

At the same time, the proverbial fruit salad is a mainstay at summer barbecues. In between bites of burger, chips and potato salad, guests are yearning for something more refreshing, something that will lift them up after such a heavy meal.

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