Tag: food news

Nutrition News: Healthy Food Choices, Fructose and Trans Fat Under Fire, Top Produce Picks in June

by in Food News, June 5, 2015

Now in Season

This month brings us not only the official beginning of summer (on June 21), but also all of those wonderful summer fruits and vegetables to add to our healthy diets. Look for sweet strawberries, thick asparagus spears, fresh peas, juicy peaches, earthy summer beats, and green garlic and spring garlic to appear at your local farmers market or CSA. “It is brilliant whole grilled and on pizza, or mince it and use it as you would garlic cloves or leeks, where it will impart a slightly milder, rounder flavor,” cookbook author and food blogger Tara O’Brady told Time. Read more

Nutrition News: Dining Out Risks, When to Eat, and How Healthy is Your Snack Bar?

by in Food News, April 17, 2015

 Another Reason to Cook at Home

Most of us enjoy a nice meal in a restaurant now and then, but a new study has found a link between eating out and hypertension. Researchers at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore found that young adults (18 to 40 years old) who ate meals away from home had an elevated rate of prehypertension and hypertension. Even eating out one extra time, the researchers found, boosted the odds of prehypertension by 6 percent. The study, conducted via a survey of university students of Asian descent, underscores how important it is to be aware of the salt and calorie content of the foods you eat, according to the research team. Read more

Food As Medicine: Why Doctors Are Writing Prescriptions for Produce

by in Food News, March 26, 2015

Every day, millions of people — adults and children — in this country with Type 2 diabetes hit their pharmacy for a variety of medicines to control that condition as well as other obesity-related ills. But what if instead of the pharmacist giving them drugs to manage their diseases, they were handed a bin of fruits and vegetables to help prevent them? Read more

Kraft Singles Seal, Healthy-Eating Education and a Food Photographer’s Secrets

by in Food News, March 20, 2015

Cheese-Product Goodness?

And the first food to get a “Kids Eat Right” nutrition seal from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics — a trade group of registered dietitians and others working in the field of nutrition — is Kraft Singles, the plastic-wrapped “Pasteurized Prepared Cheese Product” formerly known as a “pasteurized process cheese food.” That is, until the FDA blocked it from using that label because it contained an ingredient — “milk protein concentrate” — that was not allowed in products so designated. On its website, Kraft insists its Singles are colored with “spices, not food coloring” and “now” made “with no artificial preservatives.” But one parent and nutrition advocate tells The New York Times she is “really shocked” at the endorsement. She is not alone. A former member of the academy told The Times that, when he heard about the group’s decision to award the product its first seal, his “jaw just hit the floor” and his “eyebrows just hit the ceiling.” Ouch. Read more

Nutrition News: Scary Dairy Discovery, Pesco-Vegetarianism Pays Off and a Colorful Key to Healthy Food Choices

by in Food News, March 13, 2015

Got (Antibiotics in Your) Milk?

What’s in your milk? Possibly antibiotics that are not supposed to be there. The FDA spot-checked milk from about 2,000 dairy farms and, according to a new report, found six unauthorized drugs, including florfenicol, ciproflaxacin and sulfamethazine, in a small but alarming number of samples. The antibiotics found are not among those the agency usually tests for, NPR reports, because none of them have been approved for use on lactating cows; the regulations are aimed at preventing drug residues from entering the milk supply. But farmers may be using these unauthorized drugs to reduce illness in the herds while skirting detection. The FDA may have difficulty tracking the farms responsible for the antibiotics-tainted milk, but it has now launched an effort to prevent use of the unauthorized drugs on dairy cattle. Read more

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, January 8, 2014

utensils
In this week’s news: A high-tech fork tells eaters to proceed with caution; a cereal giant goes GMO-free; and a panel announces the best overall diet for 2014.

The Next Take on Slow Food?
A recent study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics examined the relationship between eating speed (fast or slow) and meal satisfaction. The result: Subjects who ate food at a slower rate were more satisfied than those who were asked to eat quickly. Eating at a slower pace can also translate into eating fewer calories.

In related news: A reporter for the Wall Street Journal recently tested an electric fork that helps moderate eating speed. When the eater scarfs down food too quickly — taking multiple bites in 10 seconds — the fork vibrates.

Read more

Why You Should Give Pale Veggies a Chance

by in Food News, September 19, 2013

white veggies

Health experts keep telling us to eat the rainbow, but according to one recent report, we should be eating more pale produce: Mushrooms, parsnips, onions, cauliflower and potatoes are surprisingly rich in fiber, magnesium and other nutrients. “A potato actually has more potassium than a banana,” says the paper’s author, Purdue University professor Connie Weaver. Another plus: Potatoes provide one of the best nutritional values per penny in the produce aisle—assuming, of course, that you don’t undo all of the good with a deep fryer.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Food News: National Parks to Offer Healthier Grub

by in Food News, June 20, 2013

park

Worried about finding healthy eats while your family visits national parks this summer? Fret not, the First Lady’s healthy diet initiative has got your back.

The National Park Service, as part of Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign, recently announced its new nationwide “Healthy Parks, Healthy People” plan: a list of food guidelines and standards for healthy options at more than 250 locations across national parks.

“Traditional favorites such as hot dogs and ice cream will remain, but the new standards will provide additional choices, such as fish tacos and yogurt parfaits, for the 23 million people who buy meals in national parks each year,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis in a press release.

Options include items like lentil soup, bison hot dogs and fresh produce from local farms. Grand Canyon South Rim and Yellowstone National park are among a handful of sites already offering healthier fair.

To find out more, view the standards here.

Tell us: What do you think of the healthy park initiative?

Ordering Food Online Might Mean Consuming More Calories

by in Dining Out, Food News, October 18, 2012

pizza on a computer screen
Ordering food online is as easy as a click of a button. Plus you avoid the long lines and there’s no human interaction. But a recent study found that ordering your meals online isn’t so good for your waistline.

The Study
A 2012 study by Ryan McDevitt, an assistant professor at the University of Rochester’s Simon Graduate School of Business, examined the patterns of people who ordered food by phone or at the counter from a franchised pizza establishment compared with those who ordered online. They looked at over 160,000 orders made by over 56,000 unique customers over 4 years. The most notable differences between those who ordered online compared to those who ordered over the phone or in person included:

  • Customers ordering online spent $0.61 more (4%), on average, though they ordered fewer items. The increase in cost was due to increased toppings.
  • The items ordered online were 15% more complex and had 6.1% more calories.

Read more

More Help for Healthy Eating on a Budget

by in Food News, September 25, 2012

shopping basket
We keep saying that healthy eating can and be budget friendly. Late last month, the folks that brought you the Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen at the Environmental Working Group (EWG) unveiled their newest consumer-friendly tool – the Good Food on a Tight Budget Guide, so there’s more help than ever for consumers who are trying to eat right but not spend more.

The List
This guide sets out to identify the most nutritious, economical and pollutant-free foods available. Looking at ingredient quality, price, nutrients, pesticide load and other factors helped to create a list of top 100 go-to foods.

Read more