Tag: fish

How to Cook Fish (Really!): A Chat with Oceana’s Ben Pollinger

by in Cookbooks, October 13, 2014

School of Fish
Alaskan Coho salmon burgers and roasted monkfish steaks are mainstays of power lunches at Oceana, the upscale, marble-bedecked New York seafood shrine adjacent to iconic Rockefeller Center. Since 2006, executive chef Ben Pollinger has lured in diners with his refined cooking. He’s held on to a coveted Michelin star, successfully transitioned Oceana into new, mammoth-sized digs, and now the ambitious New Jersey native has just released the informative School of Fish (Gallery Books) with Stephanie Lyness. Through more than 100 recipes, ranging from a baked dorade filet emblazoned with potato scales and paired with Swiss chard, to roasted lobster with basil-garlic butter accompanied by olive oil crushed potatoes, Pollinger squashes the myth for kitchen newbies and skilled home cooks alike that preparing seafood always makes for mystifying, grueling work. Read more

8 Ways to Get Your Salmon On

by in Healthy Recipes, April 13, 2014

mustard salmon
It doesn’t take much to bring out salmon’s rich flavor, but let’s face it: The old lemon-with-a-dash-of-salt routine gets old. The good news: Salmon need not be boring. Try these tasty ways to amp up an old standby.

Mustard Maple Roasted Salmon (above)
Mustard and maple syrup? The two condiments may seem worlds away, but they make the perfect marriage of sweet and savory in a sauce for salmon fillets. Cilantro keeps the flavor light and fresh.

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More Foods That Fill You Up

by in Healthy Tips, October 13, 2013

oranges

Ever wonder why a doughnut leaves you hungry within moments of finishing, while a bowl of oatmeal keeps you full for hours? An innovative study conducted in the 1990s looked at how “full” someone stayed after consuming 240 calories of a variety of foods. The top five scorers were all whole foods and, surprisingly, the No. 1 food to keep you full is often vilified for its high carbohydrate content. (Note: Most vegetables were not included in the study, likely due to the fact that consuming 240 calories of kale would require a lot of chewing! But based on the factors associated with satiety, I assume they would score very well.) Here are six foods that made the list.
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Fish Sticks: A Healthier Catch

by in Robin's Healthy Take, August 13, 2013

fish sticks

Although fish sticks can be a great way to introduce kids (and other picky eaters) to seafood, they’re basically breaded, fried, bland-tasting finger food. Yes, the omega-3 fatty acids are a terrific addition to the meal, but the 17 grams of fat per serving (3.5 ounces) isn’t. Instead of raiding the freezer, whip up a healthier version in a snap.

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20 Healthy Fish Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, July 5, 2013

grilled salmon
It’s a fabulous time of year for seafood. Dig into these healthy options for salmon, cod, tilapia and shellfish.

Healthiest Catch
There are numerous considerations when choosing healthy seafood. Fish lovers need to weigh in on things like how the fish was caught, where in the world it can be found, and whether or not it contains high amounts of mercury.

To help make sense of things, there’s the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Regional Guides. This year’s guide highlights Atlantic cod, mussels, salmon, tilapia and oysters as some of its best choices because they are “abundant, well-managed and caught or farmed in environmentally friendly ways.” You can also check your local fish counter for the Marine Stewardship Council seal of approval.

Fish Recipes to Try:

Salmon
Mustard Roasted Salmon
Blackened Salmon with Mango Salsa
Salmon Kebabs with Yogurt Sauce (above)
Poached Salmon with Lemon Mint Tzatziki
Saucy Salmon

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Husband-Tested: Broiled Tilapia With Mustard-Chive Sauce

by in Healthy Recipes, May 29, 2013

Broiled Tilapia with Mustard Sauce

Trying new food is a hot-button topic at my dinner table. My husband claims to be an open-minded man when it comes to cuisine, but the reality is that new recipes are met with resistance. Especially if the word “healthy” is involved.

Eating healthy can be overwhelming if you dive in head-first. Instead of abruptly changing our eating patterns, I decided to phase healthy recipes into our traditional mix. I chose this Broiled Tilapia With Mustard -Chive Sauce as a first-attempt and stacked the deck in my favor by selecting a dish that had a lot of familiar, husband-approved ingredients in it. Plus, the mustard-chive sauce only called for things I keep in the pantry, which is great because buying a full container of something when a recipe calls for half a teaspoon drives me nuts.

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10 Healthy Canned-Tuna Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, April 10, 2013

tuna pasta
It’s one of the easiest proteins to keep on hand for a quick meal. Get the scoop on buying the best varieties, then get ready to cook these deliciously healthy canned-tuna recipes.

Choosing the Right Can
Both water and oil-packed tuna can be used create a healthy recipe. At the market, the most common water-packed varieties are albacore and chunk light. Albacore comes from a larger species and has a milder flavor, while chunk light comes from a smaller fish and tends to have a stronger flavor. Three ounces of tuna canned in water has around 100 calories, 1 gram of fat, and 22 grams of protein.

Oil-packed varieties have more calories and fat than water-packed tuna, and the price is usually higher than water-packed. Three ounces has about 170 calories, 7 grams of fat and 25 grams of protein. Splurge on oil-packed on a special occasion and drain to help remove some of the fat.

Tuna is even more convenient than ever — you don’t even need  can opener to enjoy it; you can now find tuna in pouches. The pouches are available in the same oil and water-packed varieties with similar nutritional content to canned. Some companies like Starkist also pack their tuna in extra-virgin olive oil or sunflower oil and have low-sodium options available.

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Low-Mercury Fish

by in Healthy Recipes, May 24, 2012
tilapia
Tilapia is a low-mercury, low-cost fish with a very mild flavor.

Recommendations for eating seafood can be confusing. Fish can be a low-calorie and heart-healthy choice and the omega-3 rich fish have additional health-protecting benefits. On the other hand, some seafood contains mercury, which can be harmful in large amounts. There are plenty of seafood options with little or no mercury. Here are some fabulous options.

Tilapia
Tilapia is mild, tender and super budget-friendly. According the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, American farm-raised tilapia is the most sustainable choice.

Recipes:
Baked Tilapia
Broiled Tilapia With Horseradish and Herb-Spiked Mayo

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Tilapia Cooked on a Cedar Plank

by in Robin's Healthy Take, May 21, 2012
cedar plank tilapia
Robin's Cedar Plank Tilapia With Fresh Chimichurri

I thank Kyle, my 10 year-old son, for introducing me to cedar planks. If it weren’t for his palate, I wouldn’t have made a desperate dash to get the planks and learn how to cook with them.

Here’s what happened: Kyle discovered and immediately adored a meal in a restaurant: chili-crusted tilapia, cooked and served on a cedar plank and topped with chimichurri sauce. He cherished the dish so much, he jokingly nibbled on the plank once the fish was gone. We enjoyed many tilapia-filled evenings at that restaurant over the next two years. Then, one disastrous night, our server told us the tilapia was no longer on the menu. The news almost brought Kyle, and me, to tears.

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15 Healthiest Grilled Main Dishes

by in Grilling, Healthy Recipes, May 10, 2012
grilled salmon
Food Network Kitchens' Honey Soy Grilled Salmon With Edamame

If you’ve been grilling the same recipes each season, it’s time to shake things up. We’re giving you plenty of deliciously healthy main dish recipes to choose from—meat, chicken, fish and vegetarian—all for less than 400 calories per serving.

Meats
Beef, pork and lamb can all be healthy choices for the grill. Be sure to choose lean cuts of meat, keep portions around 3-4 ounces per serving and limit the amount of fatty ingredients like butter and oil.

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