Tag: fast food

Order This, Not That: TGI Fridays

by in Dining Out, November 8, 2015

This longtime-favorite chain has changed some of its options to make them lighter. However, there are still some calorie bombs to stay away from. Check out what you should and shouldn’t order the next time you visit your local Fridays. Read more

4 Fast Food Spots That Have Revamped Their Menus

by in Dining Out, October 26, 2015

With the demand for healthier fare, fast-food chains have been modifying — and in some cases totally revamping — their menus. Consumers want not only lower-calorie foods, but cleaner foods without artificial ingredients. According to Technomic’s 2014 The Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report, 58 percent of consumers agree that it’s important to eat healthy and pay attention to nutrition. Forty percent of consumers were more concerned about food additives last year than two years ago, and more than half of the folks surveyed said they wanted restaurants to be more transparent about menu ingredients. Here’s a look at some of the changes you will be seeing at your favorite joints. Read more

Homemade Fast-Food Alternatives for Kids

by in Healthy Recipes, October 12, 2015

French Fries

Are your kids big fans of fast food? Try these healthy, homemade and kid-friendly alternatives. Read more

Nutrition News: Fast-Food Kids, Vegetable Supply, Plate Size Matters

by in Food News, September 25, 2015

Frightening fast-food facts
If you think America has been easing off its love affair with fast food, a new CDC report offers bracing news: On any given day, according to the study, more than one-third (34.3 percent) of all U.S. kids and teens (ages 2 to 19) scarf down some kind of fast food — a number that has remained relatively stable over the past 15 years, despite our cultural push for more healthful eating. And while almost 12 percent of kids and teens got fewer than 25 percent of their daily calories from fast food, nearly 11 percent of them got between 25 and 40 percent of those calories from it — and 12 percent of them gobbled up more than 40 percent of their daily calories from places that traffic largely (though of course not exclusively) in burgers, fries, sodas and the like. Gulp. Read more

Fast-Food Salad Roundup

by in Dining Out, July 23, 2015

Ordering a salad at your favorite fast-food joint may seem like the healthiest option, but there are lots of salads on the menu with more fat and calories than a double cheeseburger with fries. All of our salad picks come in under 400 calories, dressing included! Read more

5 Top Restaurant Nutrition Calculators

by in Dining Out, May 17, 2015

Chain restaurants with more than 20 locations are required to post their menus’ nutrition information online for all patrons to peruse, but some joints make it a lot easier than others. Here are five dining establishments that make it a breeze. Read more

Healthiest Fast Food Breakfasts

by in Dining Out, April 13, 2015

With many Americans eating breakfast on-the-go, fast food joints have been increasing their offerings. You can now find healthy options at almost every menu. Here are five choices for fewer than 4oo calories each. Read more

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, January 2, 2015

In this week’s news: Fast food may make grades sink fast; there’s new evidence that resveratrol in red wine may carry ancient benefits; kids diet for the darnedest reasons (i.e., the best!).

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, August 2, 2014

roasted kale
In this week’s news: Nouveau fast-food franchises flaunt their healthy sides; coconut water claims get a reality check; rumors of kale’s demise turn out to be greatly exaggerated — and more.

Want That Salad Super-Sized?
Watch out Chipotle, a bevy of smaller fast food chains with a healthy bent may soon be nipping at your heels. Tender Greens, LYFE Kitchen, SweetGreen and Native Foods are all among this new crop of health-conscious regional restaurant franchises luring customers with words like “grass-fed,” “seasonal,’ “sustainable” and “organic.” All are reportedly flourishing, so much so that they’ve already garnered a nickname: “farm-to-counter” eateries. The vegan chain Veggie Grill, for example, hit No. 7 on Restaurant Business magazine’s yearly list of the fastest-growing small chains, while Tender Greens (which took in over $40 million in revenue from only 12 stores) came close behind, at No. 10. Also among those to watch may be LYFE (acronym for Love Your Food Every Day) Kitchen, founded by two former McDonald’s bigwigs. Each restaurant grows herbs, uses china instead of plastic and holds its entrees to a 600 calorie maximum.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, June 27, 2014

french fries
In this week’s news: Restaurant chains phase out salt on the sly; the buzz on edible insects keeps growing; and doctors confess to being clueless about nutrition.

Sodium Levels? Nothing to See Here. 
Until recently, a meal of chicken, stuffing, cornbread and mashed potatoes at Boston Market would have contained about 2,590 mg of salt — or 290 mg more than U.S. guidelines recommend for an entire day. Today, that same dinner tallies up at 2,000. Facing increasing pressure to make products healthier, the restaurant chain has quietly cut down on salt content in many of its dishes. The food giant is far from the only one: Hamburger Helper, Oreo cookies and McDonald’s french fries are just some of the items that have been “stealth health”-ified. You read right. Consumers may know that healthier food options are a good thing, but that doesn’t mean that they’re always excited to partake. Case in point: When McDonald’s started cooking without harmful trans fats, it was flooded with complaints of the fries tasting different — and not in a good way. As a result of such episodes, many brands are trying to make changes on the sly. Nevertheless, even though General Mills went the quiet route, slowly reducing sodium in Hamburger Helper by 50 percent over a six-year period, the product’s sales have been in steady decline since the salt reduction began.

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