Tag: fad diet

Diet 101: The Ketogenic Diet

by in Diets, March 12, 2017

The latest fad diet riding on the coat tails of the low-carb trend is the ketogenic diet. This nutrition plan has been around for ages, and has been effectively used in the treatment of epilepsy, but it’s also become popular to help folks shed pounds. Here’s what you need to know about this diet plan before you hop on another fad diet bandwagon.

About the Diet

This diet promotes low carb, moderate protein, and high fat intake touting health benefits such as weight loss and improved overall health.  It promotes an extremely low intake of carbs: about 30 grams per day. For the average American on a 2,000 calorie diet, this would be 120 calories of any type of carb per day. You can find carbohydrates in fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, and legumes — which, when minimized in the diet, limits food choices dramatically. The distribution of macronutrients recommended is 5% carbohydrates, 25% protein, and 70% fat.

The fats recommended include both unsaturated like avocado and fatty fish along with saturated like whole milk, sour cream, and mayonnaise. Flour, sugar, and other such carbs are not recommended on the plan. Fruits are eaten in very small amount, low carb vegetables are recommended, and nuts in moderation. Read more

Diet 101: Whole30

by in Diets, Food & Nutrition Experts, January 26, 2017

As a registered dietitian, I’ve got a healthy skepticism towards most diets. Being in private practice for almost a decade will do that to you. I’ve seen clients come in on just about every eating pattern imaginable, from raw-food to paleo and everything in between. With the growing popularity of Whole30, I set out to examine the basics of the diet and nutritional truths behind some of the claims.

 

What is Whole30?

Whole30 is an elimination diet, with shares a similar philosophy with the Paleo trend. Both recommend eating lots of fresh, high-quality foods while ditching anything processed. Specifically, you are removing all grains, dairy, soy, legumes, sugar, certain preservatives and artificial sweeteners from your diet. According to the authors, Melissa and Dallas Hartwig, these foods have been linked to hormonal imbalance, systemic inflammation, gut issues and more, though most of those claims aren’t backed by evidence-based research. Ideally, Whole30 is to be done strictly for 30 days; afterwards you can gently add back in said foods to see how your body responds.

 

Mindful eating

In addition to the diet recommendations, Whole30 encourages no calorie counting, measuring or weighing yourself for the entire 30-day process. Instead, the program focuses on non-scale victories, like improved sleep, skin, energy and overall feeling. The program isn’t promoted to be a long-term diet, but instead a reset button to focus on whole-foods that nourish your body.

As a long-time student of intuitive eating, I’m a big fan of switching the focus to non-scale victories and removing the added pressure of specific numbers and goals. For most dieters, these are big detractors and can often feel like punishment rather than an empowered choice. However, one of the tenets of intuitiveness is allowing yourself to eat whatever you want, without any parameters in place. Whole30 can fit this mindset if you are truly enjoying the foods you are eating and don’t feel deprived, but it’s not an automatic switch to mindful eating. Read more

Forget the Diet! Make These 7 Small Changes Instead

by in Diets, Healthy Tips, January 6, 2017

Two of the most common New Year’s resolutions are to lose weight and get healthier. In order to achieve these goals, many folks jump on the fad diet bandwagon. But many of these diets require complete elimination of certain food groups, have you eating close to nothing or recommend a boatload of supplements that empty your wallet. Instead of looking for quick results that will probably not last long, make these small changes instead. Make these small changes for at least 6 months, and they can become lifelong healthy habits.

Measure Ingredients

Large portions are one way folks overconsume calories. This is especially true with certain high calorie foods, including nuts, salad dressing, oil, peanut butter, granola, rice, pasta and juice. Although all these foods can be part of a healthy weight loss plan, eating controlled portions will help keep calories in check.

Eat At Least 2 Whole Grains per Day

The 2015 dietary guidelines for Americans recommend getting half your grain intake from whole grains. If you’re not used to eating any whole grains, start with two serving per day. For example, make your sandwich with 100% whole wheat bread, or swap your pasta from traditional white to whole wheat. Read more

Diet 101: The Cabbage Soup Diet

by in Diets, August 24, 2015

This fad diet has been around for years, promising followers dramatic weight loss in seven days. But is slurping cabbage soup day after day a healthy way to lose weight? Read more

Intermittent Fasting: Good or Bad?

by in Diets, May 16, 2015

This “fast and feast” style of eating is the new way of dieting. One day you “fast” by limiting food to 500 calories, while the next you “feast” by eating as you normally would. But is this flip-flop lifestyle a healthy way to shed unwanted pounds, or just another fad?

The Intermittent Fasting Trend
Several books about intermittent fasting have recently been released. The Every Other Day Diet: The Diet That Lets You Eat All You Want (Half the Time) and Keep the Weight Off was written by Dr. Krista Varda, an assistant professor of kinesiology and nutrition at the University of Illinois, who began studying the effects of intermittent fasting on mice. Based on her post-doctoral research conducted at the University of California Berkeley, she found that mice ate only 25 percent more on feast days and didn’t compensate for the lack of food provided on fast days.

A second popular book titled The Fast Diet, written by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer, uses the same concept, except you can choose which two non-consecutive days each week to fast. This method of intermittent fasting is also known as the 5:2 approach (five days feasting, two days fasting). Read more

Diet 101: Blood Type Diets

by in Diets, October 16, 2009

blood type diet
Is the secret to weight loss determined by your blood type? If you ask some blood-type diet fans, yes. If you ask us, doubtful. Never heard of this diet craze? Here are the basics.

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