Tag: egg

10 Healthy Foods You Aren’t Eating (But Should Be)

by in Healthy Tips, October 9, 2014

Milk
You may be loading up on chia seeds and kale, but there are nutrition powerhouses all around you. (Probably in your pantry right now!) Here are 10 super foods most folks are missing out on.
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Eggs: Myths vs. Facts

by in Healthy Tips, August 12, 2013

eggs

There are so many misconceptions swirling around eggs. I hear egg chatter in crowded elevators or at dinner parties—folks so proud about tossing that golden yolk. The next time you find yourself in the midst of an egg conversation, pipe in with these egg-cellent facts.

Myth: Always toss the yolks (it’s egg white omelets or nothing!).
Fact: To get the scoop on this longtime myth, I spoke with dietitian Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD, author of MyPlate for Moms, How to Feed Yourself & Your Family Better and consultant for Eggland’s Best. Ward says, “It is the fat and cholesterol that scares people most about egg yolks, but I think most folks would be surprised to learn that most of the fat in eggs is unsaturated, or the heart-healthy kind. In addition, eggs are surprisingly low in saturated fat. As you know, saturated fat raises blood cholesterol levels with more force than does cholesterol.”

In addition, “egg yolks have nearly half the protein of an entire egg, plus all the vitamins and minerals and omega 3s, ” Ward says. “Eggs pack in good nutrition for about 70 calories each.”

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Easter Egg Safety

by in Easter, Food Safety, Healthy Holidays, March 27, 2013

Easter eggs
Easter wouldn’t be complete without brightly-colored eggs and a full out egg hunt. But who wants to ruin the festivities with spoiled eggs?

Food Safety Basics
Eggs are considered a potentially hazardous food that may cause illness if they’re not handled correctly. Raw and undercooked eggs have been associated with salmonella poisoning. Most folks infected with the salmonella bacteria develop symptoms about 12 to 72 hours after infected. Most people can recover but if symptoms are severe, hospitalization may be required especially in those with a compromised immune system (like the very young and old). Proper handling, cooking, and hand washing can prevent most of the issues.

Keeping Eggs Safe
Egg safety begins at your market and continues until the time when you reserve leftovers.

  • Purchasing: Inspect egg cartons at the market. Don’t purchase cracked or dirty eggs and be sure to check the sell-by date. Eggs should always be refrigerated, even when on display.
  • Storing: Be sure to get those eggs home quickly. They shouldn’t sit at room temperature longer than 2 hours—1 hour if it’s above 90 degrees. Once home, place the eggs in your refrigerator immediately.
  • Preparing: When preparing eggs, wash your hands, any utensils, and surfaces that will come into contact with the eggs. If you’re not sure if the eggs are safe to eat, toss them. Once the equipment is used for the eggs, be sure to wash them with soap and warm water immediately. Don’t use them for another prep task (that’s cross-contamination!).
  • Cooking: Always make sure that your eggs are safe to eat. For hard-boiled (or any cooked) eggs, you want to cook the eggs until both the white and yolk are firm. Learn how to make perfect hard-boiled eggs.
  • Leftovers: Hard-boiled eggs can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. They shouldn’t be frozen.

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Ask HE: Should you eat just the egg white?

by in Ask the Experts, September 14, 2011
hard-boiled eggs
Is it really healthy to skip the yolk?

Many health-conscious folks opt for egg whites only. Little do they know they’re wasting a huge dose of protein and other precious nutrients when they toss out those golden yolks.

Q: When looking to take in healthy protein from eggs, should you go for the whole thing or just eat the egg white?

A: When you look at the nutrients it’s hard to dispute. Eggs have a lot of nutrition going on and most of it’s found in the egg yolk.

Marcia Greenblum, MS, RD, senior director of nutrition education for the Egg Nutrition Center brought us up to speed on all the goodies that eggs have to offer. The white of a large egg provides 3.6 grams of protein, but you’ll also find an additional 2.7 grams hanging out in the yolk. The yolk is also home to all the heart-healthy fats and hefty doses of vitamins like riboflavin, D and B12; nutrients like choline and selenium are also in abundance.

Yes, yolks are also where all the not-so-healthy fat and cholesterol are hiding. If you do have high cholesterol, you may have to limit your intake, but with only 1.6 grams of saturated fat per serving, eggs can certainly be worked in to a heart-healthy diet. To cut down on some of the fat and cholesterol, use a combination of whole eggs plus a few extra egg whites in egg dishes like omelets, frittatas and quiche.

Tell Us: Do you keep or toss the yolks?

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition. See Dana’s full bio »

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Better Together: Power Food Combinations

by in Healthy Tips, May 17, 2011
Spinach and Bacon Quiche
Eggs and cheese: (nutritionally) better together.

Some foods just taste great together, like milk and cookies. But others pairs actually work together to help your body get the most nutrition bang for its buck. Here are 5 of the most powerful food combos.

Eat it together: 5 power food combos »

Cook Once, Please Everyone: Breakfast Burrito

by in Healthy Tips, March 3, 2011
Everyone can customize these breakfast burritos, making it a dish the whole family will love!

Breakfast burritos are the perfect family breakfast: They’re nutritious, easy and totally customizable for both picky junior eaters and adults. When I tried this at home, my kids went gaga! Here’s how to make a breakfast burrito spread to please the whole family.

Breakfast burrito how-to »

Casseroles 5 Ways

by in 1 Food, 5 Ways, Healthy Recipes, November 2, 2010
Ellie's Sweet Potato Casserole
Ellie's Sweet Potato-Pecan Casserole

A one-stop meal, casseroles make an easy weeknight dinner (and next day lunch). But many recipes call for cups (yes, cups!) of mayo, cans of creamy soup or lots of heavy cream — if you eat  these on a regular basis, you may as well have “911” on redial for the after-dinner coronary. Here are our top 5 lighter casseroles that’ll keep your waist slim and your heart in tip-top shape.

See all 5 lightened-up casseroles »

5 Ingredients or Less: Eggs In A Basket

by in 5-Ingredient Recipes, Healthy Recipes, October 11, 2010
Toby's Eggs in a Basket

Also called “eggs-in-a-hole”, “birds nest,” “eggs-in-a-blanket” or “toad-in-a-hole”, I served this fun breakfast fave  to my kids on their first day of school. With less than 5 ingredients, it’s an easy and stress-free dish to cook up on a school day.

Get the easy breakfast recipe »

Fall Fest: Mini Spinach-Mushroom Quiches

by in In Season, September 22, 2010
Healthy Mini Quiche Recipe
Mini Mushroom-Spinach Quiches

We’re teaming up with other food and garden bloggers to host Fall Fest 2010, a season-long garden party. Each week we’ll feature favorite garden-to-table recipes and tips to help you enjoy the bounty, whether you’re harvesting your own goodies or buying them fresh from the market. To join in, check out awaytogarden.com.

So, summer’s officially ending tomorrow, but so what? There’s no reason to be blue. Fall’s got plenty to offer: Winter squash, football games, pick-your-own apple orchards and (finally!) cooler temperatures. Just like my box of sweaters, all the greens I loved in the spring are peeping out again, including Popeye’s favorite: spinach.  I’m celebrating the return of this all-purpose green with a batch of individually-sized spinach-mushroom quiches.

Get the mini spinach quiche recipe »

Reading List: No Sub For Real Fruit, Calories In Theaters, and Time For Your “Shelvic” Exam

by in Food News, September 3, 2010

children's vitamins

In this week’s nutrition news: Too many vitamins can harm kids, the unsanitary conditions found on egg farms and have you looked inside your pantry lately?

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