Tag: diets

Nutrition News: Fast Food and Hormones, Nordic Diet, Family Meals

by in Food News, April 22, 2016

Fries with that hormone disrupter?

Yet another reason to skip fast food if you want to eat healthy: A new study indicates that fast food may expose those who consume it to chemicals called phthalates, which can disrupt hormones and even lower sperm count in men. Researchers at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health found that people who had consumed more than 35 percent of their calories from fast food in the previous 24 hours had significantly higher levels of two phthalate byproducts, DEHP and DiNP. The authors suggest that the phthalates may have gotten into food — possibly from sources like plastic gloves or conveyor belts — during preparation or packaging, and that the heat from cooking may exacerbate the issue.

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News Feed: Big Breakfast News, Vegan Nutrition, Dieting Done Differently

by in Food News, March 25, 2016

Starting the Day Right

It’s a big week for breakfast news: A new study, published in the journal Pediatric Obesity, found that middle-school students who ate no breakfast or ate it only occasionally had double the risk of obesity as those who ate breakfast regularly. But students who ate “double-breakfast” — first at home and then at school — did not seem to be at any greater risk for obesity as those who ate only one breakfast, either at home or school. “It seems it’s a bigger problem to have kids skipping breakfast than to have these kids eating two breakfasts,” concluded study co-author Marlene Schwartz, of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. Meanwhile, the Deseret News weighed whether cereal, the sales of which have declined in recent years, is a breakfast food worth rescuing, and Time offered an eye-opening look at 10 healthy breakfast options enjoyed in countries around the world.

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News Feed: Raw Milk’s Revenge, Ugly Produce and Fasting

by in Food News, March 11, 2016

Raw milk or raw luck?

Oh, the irony! Just weeks after passing legislation making it legal to drink raw milk in West Virginia — despite warnings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration that unpasteurized milk may “pose a serious health risk” — members of the state’s House of Delegates celebrated by drinking raw milk. Guess what happened? A bunch of the lawmakers fell ill. Some of the delegates, including some of those who drank the milk and the guy who distributed it to his colleagues, insist that one had nothing to do with the other, blaming the illnesses on a stomach bug that was going around. “There’s nobody up there that got sick off that milk,” Delegate Scott Cadle, who sponsored the legislation and shared the milk, told the Charleston Gazette-Mail. “It’s just bad timing, I guess.” The West Virginia Bureau of Public Health is investigating.

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Nutrition News: “Healthy” Trumps “Diet,” Eating Snow Deemed Safe, Healthy Fats Could Save Lives

by in Food News, January 29, 2016

Diets Are Out, but Healthy Is In

Have you given up dieting? Consider yourself on-trend. Brand-name diets like Jenny Craig, Weight Watchers and Lean Cuisine are falling out of fashion, NPR’s The Salt reported. Healthy eating is in. In a recent survey by the market research firm Mintel, 94 percent of respondents said they’ve ceased to see themselves as “dieters” and doubt the healthfulness of brand-name diets. “Consumers are not dieting in the traditional sense anymore — being on programs or buying foods specific to programs,” Mintel analyst Marissa Gilbert told The Salt. Those who are trying to lose weight are increasingly taking what market research firm Morningstar analyst R.J. Hottovy described as “a more holistic, more health and wellness approach.”

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Nutrition News: Best Diets, Blown Diets and Why Red Wine Is Better than Grape Juice

by in Food News, January 15, 2016

Resolve to Forgive Yourself

If you’ve already blown your New Year’s resolution to diet, don’t be too hard on yourself; it may be evolution’s fault. According to researchers at the University of Exeter, in England, humans have a natural urge to overeat in the winter because our ancestors needed to build and maintain body fat to survive when food was scarce. “Storing fat is an insurance against the risk of failing to find food, which for pre-industrial humans was most likely in winter,” Andrew Higginson, the study’s lead author, said in a news release. “This suggests that New Year’s Day is the worst possible time to start a new diet.” Now they tell us.

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How to Eat Like a Yogi

by in Healthy Tips, January 10, 2016

You can downward dog and chaturanga like a champ. But is your eating yogic? We’re not talking about the Ayurvedic, vegetarian eating plan that’s often associated with yoga. Rather, we’re encouraging you to bring the “spirit of yoga” to the table. This is one of the ways you do yoga “off the mat.” As you revamp your health routine this new year, consider yoga-fying your diet with these five tips.

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7 Ways to Jump-Start Your New Year’s Resolutions

by in Healthy Tips, January 1, 2016

Losing weight and getting healthy isn’t something that happens once a year — it’s something that should last a lifetime. Instead of waiting until January 1 to start planning your healthy eating resolutions, start doing these seven things today.

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9 New Year’s Resolution Diet Mistakes You’re Already Making

by in Healthy Tips, December 30, 2015

Don’t be duped by bad diet advice. To achieve optimum health in the new year, steer clear of these diet don’ts, and stick with our advice on what to do.

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8 Holiday Foods That Are Ruining Your Diet

by in Healthy Recipes, December 22, 2015

The holidays are filled with an overwhelming amount of food. It may seem fun at the beginning, but after indulging at party after party, you might find that these foods can quickly bust your waistline. Here are eight foods to watch out for at your next holiday shindig.

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Nutrition News: Millennial Diets, Cage-Free Taco Bell, Green Tea and Metabolism

by in Food News, November 20, 2015

Green TeaDiet-Ditching Millennials

Ah, youth. Millennials are less concerned about calories and fat in the foods they eat than the population at large and are more inclined to use technology as a health and wellness tool, according to the International Food Information Council’s 2015 Food and Health Survey. The survey also found that millennials (born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s) are more likely to believe higher-protein foods may have unhealthy attributes, are more apt to use diet-related apps and online support groups, rely more heavily on the support of family and friends in their efforts to maintain a healthy diet, and tend to trust health and nutrition bloggers and to feel more optimistic about the healthful potential of food innovations and new inventions. “Millennials are a unique generation, and their approach to health and fitness is no exception,” Sarah Romotsky, R.D., director of health and wellness for the IFIC Foundation, told Food Business News.

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