Tag: dairy

Nutrition News: Scary Dairy Discovery, Pesco-Vegetarianism Pays Off and a Colorful Key to Healthy Food Choices

by in Food News, March 13, 2015

Got (Antibiotics in Your) Milk?

What’s in your milk? Possibly antibiotics that are not supposed to be there. The FDA spot-checked milk from about 2,000 dairy farms and, according to a new report, found six unauthorized drugs, including florfenicol, ciproflaxacin and sulfamethazine, in a small but alarming number of samples. The antibiotics found are not among those the agency usually tests for, NPR reports, because none of them have been approved for use on lactating cows; the regulations are aimed at preventing drug residues from entering the milk supply. But farmers may be using these unauthorized drugs to reduce illness in the herds while skirting detection. The FDA may have difficulty tracking the farms responsible for the antibiotics-tainted milk, but it has now launched an effort to prevent use of the unauthorized drugs on dairy cattle. Read more

6 Foods to Try This Year

by in Grocery Shopping, Have You Tried, February 8, 2015


Is eating healthier on your list of New Year’s resolutions? These six foods are on this year’s must-try list because they pack a nutritional punch. Dig into these better-for-you foods and make your 2015 resolution a reality. Read more

What to Look for on a Yogurt Label

by in Uncategorized, July 24, 2014

yogurt
The yogurt section in the dairy aisle has been expanding rapidly, with more spins on the creamy delight than you can shake a spoon at. The next time you’re adding yogurt to your shopping cart, here are some things to keep in mind as you scan the label.

Added Sugar
All yogurts contain sugar. Yogurt is made from milk, which contains lactose, a natural sugar found in milk. It’s the added sugar — what the yogurt manufacturer brings to the mix — that buyers need to watch out for. Fruit-flavored yogurt and honey-flavored yogurt have more sugar than plain because of added sugars. If you read the ingredient list, you will see words like fructose and evaporated cane sugar, both of which are simply different names for sugar. A good rule of thumb: If a yogurt contains more than 20 grams of sugar per serving, it’s more of a dessert than a healthful snack.

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Cream: Good or Bad?

by in Healthy Tips, November 2, 2013

cream
With loads of calories and artery-clogging saturated fat, can cream ever really be part of a healthy diet?

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Cheese: Is It Healthy?

by in Is It Healthy?, October 17, 2013

blue cheese
Does this dairy delight have a place in your healthy eating plan? Although cheeses have gotten bad press for being high in artery-clogging fat, the right ones can provide important nutrients to your diet.

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How to Choose a Healthy Yogurt

by in Healthy Tips, September 29, 2013

yogurt
These days, you can’t miss the yogurt aisle. Markets now have two, three or more cases designated to this creamy delight. But with so many choices, it’s easy to become overwhelmed and confused on which is healthiest.

Added vs. Natural Sugar
Before eyeballing any label, understand that you’ll find sugar in each any yogurt you pick up. Yogurt has natural sugar (called lactose) and unless it’s a plain variety it will also have sugar added for sweetness.  The nutrition facts combine both the natural and added sugar under “sugars.” The only way to know if any sugar was added is to look at the ingredients list.

To keep in line with the recommendations from The American Heart Association, women should limit their sugar to no more than 6 teaspoons per day (or 100 calories’ worth) while men should  eat a max of 9 teaspoons of sugar per day (or 150 calories). This means capping sugar to no more than 20 grams per serving, which would be about 2 teaspoons of added sugar.

Some brands use sugar substitutes instead of added sugar. This will help lower the total sugar amount–remember, you will still be getting natural sugar from the yogurt. I tend to shy away from those varieties and rather purchase a plain yogurt and flavor it myself with a touch of natural sweeteners like honey or maple syrup.

Probiotics
These good bacteria are found in most yogurts help keep your digestive tract in working order. You can find the actual bacteria names under the ingredient list—look for words like L. acidophilus, L. casei, B. bifidum and B. Longum.

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Milk 101

by in Food Safety, May 13, 2010

milk

Ever wondered why milk is “homogenized” and “pasteurized” and why the heck vitamin D is added? We’ll iron out these terms and explain why they’re on your milk container.

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Taste Test: Nonfat Vanilla Yogurt

by in Grocery Shopping, Taste Test, May 12, 2010

vanilla yogurt

Quick, easy, portable and healthy — yogurt is an all-around favorite snack. But with supermarket shelves stacked with the stuff, shopping for yogurt can get confusing. After some tasting and label reading, check out what we found.

See the yogurt taste-test results »

Weekly Bits: Kids' Menus & a DIY Salsa

by in Uncategorized, September 5, 2009

Check our our favorite tips for stopping those onion tears, jarring your own salsa and what your kids order when the family is dining out. You guys were full of ideas this week!

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Good Eats for Better Bones

by in Healthy Tips, July 30, 2009

chard_lead
Let’s face it — most of us could do more for our bones. An estimated 44 million Americans are at risk for, or have, osteoporosis, a disease where bones become increasingly fragile and sometimes fracture. Though women are 4 times more likely to suffer from osteoporosis, men are affected as well. Exercise and some medications can help, but what you eat plays a vital role. Whether you’re worried or not, you can’t go wrong incorporating more of these foods into your daily routine.

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