Tag: cruciferous vegetables

12 Delicious Brussels Sprouts Recipes

by in In Season, October 26, 2013

brussels sprouts
Studies have found that these members of the cabbage family, which are now in season, may help reduce the risk of cancer. Pick up a bunch on your next trip to the market, and show them off in any of these recipes.

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11 Healthy Kale Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, January 24, 2013

kale salad
This hearty winter green is expected to gain popularity in 2013. Get ahead of the trend and start cooking these outstanding kale recipes now.

Nutrition Lowdown
One cup of chopped kale contains 33 calories, 2 grams of protein, and 1 gram of fiber. It has more than twice the recommended daily dose of vitamin A and almost seven times the vitamin K. It’s an excellent source of vitamin C and manganese and a good source of copper.

This green leafy is also a member of the cruciferous veggie (AKA cabbage) family, which has been shown to help protect against various types of cancer.

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Cancer Prevention: Cruciferous Veggies

by in Healthy Recipes, Healthy Tips, February 4, 2012
broccoli
Broccoli is loaded with cancer-fighting plant chemicals.

In honor of World Cancer Day, we’re focusing on cruciferous veggies—those from the cabbage family. Studies show that these vegetables have a special plant chemical that protects against cancer. Here are some ideas on how to incorporate them into your everyday eating plan.

The Power
Cruciferous vegetables include cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, turnips, kale, and Brussels sprouts. These superstar veggies are packed with so many nutrients it’s tough to keep count. They contain fiber, vitamins A and C, riboflavin, B6, folic acid, magnesium, potassium and omega-3 fats. What’s more, they also have plant chemicals known as glucosinolates that have been shown to help reduce the risk of various types of cancer.

A 2011 study in the International Journal of Urology found that the more veggies that were eaten from the cabbage family, the lower the risk was from prostate cancer. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, studies also link the various components in cruciferous veggies to helping reduce the risk of colorectal, esophageal, stomach, mouth and pancreatic cancer.

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