Tag: cookbooks

Lily Kunin Makes Clean Eating Simple in Her Debut Cookbook

by in Cookbooks, Healthy Recipes, Vegan, March 4, 2017

For health coach and blogger Lily Kunin, healthy eating is about what makes her body feel its best. This simple philosophy is the basis for her debut cookbook, Good Clean Food, in which Kunin proves that plant-based eating can be personalized to meet an individual’s needs. In it, you’ll find a bowl builder that will help you customize your perfect grain bowl, and a focus on how food can make you feel, as opposed to what meal you’re planning for. We caught up with the founder of Clean Food Dirty City to talk blogging, cooking styles and eating clean in the Big Apple.

 

Food Network: When and why did you adopt a plant-based diet?

Lily Kunin: I suffered from migraines and vertigo starting in high school, and for a period of about 5 years I had pretty severe symptoms. I tried everything from conventional medicine to alternative therapies and nothing really worked until one therapist said the problem could be my diet. And after some trial and error I gave up gluten, and for the first time in a few years, I felt symptom-free. That was when I connected what I was putting my body — food — to how it was making me feel. That said, I’m not completely plant-based. I eat a heavily plant-based diet, but I also incorporate some pasture-raised eggs, wild salmon and grass-fed meats, too.

 

FN: How long have you been Instagramming and blogging?

LK: I started my Instagram, @cleanfooddirtycity, in 2014 as a photo diary for me. I didn’t even tell my friends about it. I would make recipes off the top of my head, take a picture and post it on Instagram so I could look back in a week and see what I made. It snowballed from there when people started asking for recipes and that’s why I started my blog with gluten-free and dairy-free recipes. I’ve recently started adding new natural beauty recipes and clean travel tips. Read more

Q&A with Blogger Laura Wright, Author of The First Mess

by in Cookbooks, February 28, 2017

With more people choosing a healthy lifestyle — and caring about where their food comes from and how it makes them feel — home cooks are flocking to Saveur award-winning blogger Laura Wright of The First Mess for both accessible seasonal vegan recipes and her captivating storytelling.

Why start a food blog?
Laura Wright: I was honestly just bored when I started my blog. I had been working in restaurants for a while and was getting called off shifts at a not-so-busy spot. So my friend suggested I take all of these things I had learned about plant-based cooking and apply it to an online project.

How did you learn to cook plant-based foods?
LW: I attended a nutritional culinary program that had me learning meat, fish, dairy, egg and produce preparations. Just learning the basics of classic cookery helped me when I applied it to my plant-based preferences. For my internship portion of college, I went to a strictly vegan restaurant, which was interesting in a lot of ways, but quite educational. I also grew up with a mother who cooked from scratch pretty much every night, so watching and learning from her gave me a good start.

What impact did growing up on a farm have on your perspective of food, cooking and community?
LW: I wouldn’t call it a farm — more of a large-scale hobby garden. The constant presence of fresh, seasonal food on the part of my family definitely put me on the right path. I cook at home and plant my own vegetables in the summer because of my upbringing, which is a huge part of my life now. I don’t really waste food because I know what goes into its passage from seed to dinner. I have such a reverence for the superior flavor of good produce, whole grains, nuts, seeds, etc. They make cooking easy, nourishing and fun — and that’s the message I try to convey with my work. Read more

Eat These Foods to Boost Your Brain Power

by in Cookbooks, Diets, Food & Nutrition Experts, February 4, 2017

We’ve all had those days when our brains feel foggy: when we can’t focus and our memory is less-than sharp. And chances are, you’ve resorted to extra caffeine and a sugary snack in an effort to jolt your brain back into full function. But what if you could consume something that’s actually healthy for your brain instead?

That’s the idea behind numerous supplements, foods and drinks that contain nootropics, substances purported to improve cognition. Nootropic cocktails may contain any number of things including B vitamins, L-theanine, niacin, as well as various herbs and amino acids. But despite the growing popularity of these brain boosters, there is little scientific evidence to back up most of their claims. “I love the idea of boosting brain power, but show me any science that a supplement is better than movement, meditation and nutrient-dense brain food when it comes to mental health,” says Drew Ramsey, MD, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry, Columbia University and author of Eat Complete (Harper Collins, 2016).

According to Ramsey, boosting brain power is actually pretty simple. He even made a little rhyme about the key brain foods to make it easy to remember: “Seafood, greens, nuts and beans.” Eating more of those core foods can go a long way toward keeping your brain healthy—and a healthy brain works better. Important nutrients for feeding your brain include omega-3 fats, monounsaturated fats, vitamin B12, zinc, magnesium, iron, choline, lycopene, vitamin E and carotenoids. It’s not about a specific food or magic bullet supplement, but rather categories of healthy foods that provide high levels of these proven brain-boosting nutrients. “Our brains consume 20 percent of everything we eat,” says Ramsey. “This nourishment provides energy and nutrients to create and sustain the quadrillions of connections that construct the brain, plus the electricity that courses between those connections.” In other words: if you want a better brain, feed it better food. Read more

A Look Inside Healthy Grain Bowls

by in Cookbooks, January 20, 2017

Grain bowls are trending, and there’s an art to making these one-dish creations. I called on the expertise of Carolynn Carreño, author of Bowl of Plenty: Recipes for Healthy and Delicious Whole-Grain Meals on how to make bowls that are as beautiful and balanced as they are delicious.

  1. What inspired you to write an entire cookbook on one-dish whole grain meals?

Eating bowls filled with grains and topped with smaller amounts of deliciousness has been my way of keeping myself healthy and feeling good for years. I had some pretty serious, chronic issues with my health, and the way I got better was by restricting a lot of foods from my diet. But there was no way that was going to last forever. Eating and cooking in a non-restrictive, “gourmet” way is a major part of my life. I test recipes for cookbook collaborations. I travel to other countries, such as Italy and Mexico, and I want to experience the foods of those places. I go to food events and I go out to eat about every other night in New York City. Plus, I just love good food.

I didn’t want to deprive myself, so as I started to feel better, I kept myself introducing small portions of what I call “the good stuff”—flavorful proteins and dairy and condiments—onto piles of steamed brown rice (quinoa came later, and then farro and the rest) and Brussels sprouts or broccoli.  I’d put a tiny portion of shredded Mexican pork on a big bowl of brown rice with some black beans and broccoli for good measure. It was a middle ground between healthy and delicious that allowed me to have everything I wanted, without feeling like I got ran over by a truck the next day. When grain bowls went mainstream, I wanted to show the world that there can be so much more to a grain bowl than pink hummus and watermelon radishes. Read more

Exploring The MIND Diet

by in Cookbooks, October 29, 2016

Diets come and go, but the MIND Diet has the potential to cut the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in half and keep the brain more than seven years younger. The author of The MIND Diet, nutrition expert Maggie Moon, M.S., RDN, claims this approach to nutrition “is heart-healthy and a solid foundation for healthy eating for just about anyone.” So what exactly does the MIND Diet entail?

The Origin of MIND
The MIND Diet is a cross between the Mediterranean Diet and the DASH Diet. “MIND” stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay. The diet was developed by researchers at Rush University who created a nutrition plan shown to help lower the risk of Alzheimer’s disease by more than one-third. In this prospective study, 923 people between the ages of 58 and 98 were followed for four-and-a-half years while following the Mediterranean Diet, the DASH Diet and the MIND Diet. Those who adhered to the MIND Diet the most reduced their risk for Alzheimer’s by 53 percent compared with those who did not adhere closely to the diet. Even those who partially adhered to the MIND Diet were still able to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s by 35 percent compared with those who did not follow the diet.

The Diet
The original diet was developed by Martha Clare Morris, Ph.D., a nutritional epidemiologist at Rush University in Chicago, and her colleagues, who identified 10 “brain-healthy food groups” that were brimming with antioxidants, resveratrol and healthy fatty acids. These foods included berries, green leafy vegetables, olive oil, nuts, whole grains, fish and beans. According to the researchers, strawberries and blueberries were shown to be the most-potent berries in terms of protecting against Alzheimer’s and preserving cognitive function. Read more

Are You Vegan Curious?

by in Cookbooks, September 13, 2016

In her new book, The Book of Veganish (Pam Krauss Books/Avery, 2016), Kathy Freston shares her own journey from omnivore to vegan — including many stops along the way. “I’d always been an animal lover, and one day after seeing a pamphlet depicting animals being led to slaughter, I realized that I wanted to be someone who loved animals, not ate them,” she recalls. That was 12 years ago, but she didn’t go cold turkey on burgers, ice cream, cheese and eggs. Instead, she gradually started leaning toward a more plant-based diet. “I didn’t give up anything until I’d found an alternative I liked as much or more, so it never felt like I was depriving myself,” she says.

So what exactly does it mean to be “veganish?”
Kathy Freston: I’m all about the -ish. I get upset with the ‘vegan police’ who insist on purity and a strict regime. Too many people will reject that message because it’s just too hard. It’s OK to give yourself a little wiggle room as you investigate plant-based eating and move away from eating animals. But it should be a joyful process done in your own way at your own pace. ‘Veganish’ is about individual choice and not putting too much pressure on yourself to do it perfectly.

What do you suggest as a starting point for someone who wants to be veganish but doesn’t really know where to begin?
KF: When I started eating this way, I didn’t have the benefit of social media to help me out. Now, the best thing you can do is check out Instagram, type in #VeganFood or #VeganRecipes and you’ll get tons of amazing ideas. It’s really inspiring. And once you see all of the options, it doesn’t feel so daunting to eat this way. Read more

Healthy Coloring Books for Adults

by in Cookbooks, March 16, 2016

Part of living a healthy lifestyle is minimizing stress. One of the latest trends that help do so are coloring books for grownups. Even better, some of these coloring books double as cookbooks. Here’s a look into this latest trend and where you can pick them up.

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Ellie Krieger’s New Cookbook: You Have It Made

by in Cookbooks, January 13, 2016

The queen of healthy cooking, Ellie Krieger, is back; her new cookbook is filled with delicious, healthy make-ahead meals. I had the pleasure of talking with Ellie about her new cookbook (released Jan. 5, 2016) and even got a peek at one of her newest casserole recipes.

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Anything Is Possible: Just Ask Chef Robert Irvine  

by in Cookbooks, September 15, 2015

Chef Robert Irvine has built a career on helping people achieve things they thought couldn’t be done. On his Food Network shows “Dinner: Impossible” and “Restaurant: Impossible” he routinely turns around seemingly doomed situations — challenging both himself and the others involved to dig deep in order to succeed. Read more

How to Eat Well on $4 a Day: A Q&A with Cookbook Author Leanne Brown

by in Cookbooks, August 13, 2015


Canadian-born Leanne Brown was working on her master’s in food studies at New York University when she became interested in finding a way to get people more engaged in food and cooking — especially those who don’t have a lot of money to spend on it. “I wanted to show people that good food can actually be had for very little,” she said. So she created a collection of recipes geared to the $4 a day food budget of those who rely on SNAP (the government food assistance program formerly called food stamps) and posted it on her website as a free PDF. Several hundred thousand downloads later, she produced an expanded, print version of Good and Cheap: Eat well on $4/Day (Workman, 2015). Here she talks with Healthy Eats about creating delicious food on a budget: Read more