Tag: chocolate

Being Mindful Helps Chocolate Boost Your Mood

by in Food News, October 15, 2016

There’s no denying that chocolate is a feel-good food — which is why so many of us reach for it at the first sign of stress or unhappiness. The problem is that by the time we’ve mindlessly munched down an entire candy bar or several handfuls of Hershey’s Kisses, we don’t necessarily feel any better. In fact, we’re more likely to feel overly full, plus a bit guilt-stricken for gorging on sweets.

But what if you could not only feel satisfied, but also actually boost your mood by eating just one small square of chocolate? According to a study recently published in the journal Appetite, it is possible. Researchers at Gettysburg College recruited 258 students and assigned them to one of four groups. In one group the participants each ate 75 calories’ worth of chocolate while being mindful; participants in another group each ate five crackers in the same manner; and participants in the other two groups each ate either the chocolate or the crackers without being mindful. The two groups assigned to be mindful were instructed to hold the food and think about the farmers who produced the ingredients necessary to make it. After that, they were told to focus on the sensations of the food in their mouths as they ate. Start to finish — eating either the chocolate or the crackers mindfully — took about four minutes. The non-mindful groups were instructed to eat half their food, then wait four minutes to eat the other half, in order to keep the time frames of consumption similar. Read more

News Feed: Sugar in Juice; Chocolate and Exercise; Benefits of Japanese Diet Guidelines

by in Food News, April 1, 2016

The truth about juice

Sure, “100% fruit juice” sounds healthy, but guess what? Just one serving of many kid-targeted fruit juices, juice drinks or smoothies contains a full day’s worth of sugar, or more, according to new research published in BMJ Open. “Most people assume, wrongly, that fruit juice is healthy and contains little free sugar,” study author Dr. Simon Capewell, of the University of Liverpool, told Time, referring to added sugars, including glucose, fructose, sucrose and table sugar as well as honey and syrup. However, many of the products Capewell and his colleagues tested “contained up to six teaspoons of sugar in a standard 200 ml serving, twice the daily recommended limit for a young child,” he said. Smoothies were often even worse, containing as much as eight teaspoons of sugar — three times the U.K.’s recommended daily amount — in the standard serving. Whoa.

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5 Chocolatey Reasons to Stay in This Valentine’s Day — Comfort Food Feast

by in Healthy Recipes, Valentine's Day, February 11, 2016

Between pricey prix fixe menus and absurdly long wait times, dining out on Valentine’s Day is never what it’s cracked up to be. If you haven’t yet scored a reservation at that new brasserie people have been raving about, don’t sweat it. Instead, use the night as an opportunity to kick back with your date (or your best friend!) and toast Cupid’s handiwork with some homemade eats and a whole lot of chocolate. It might sound cliche, but this is the one day that we get a pass to indulge in all things sweet and chocolatey — so why wouldn’t we? Maybe you’re trying to avoid a post-meal sugar crash. We get that. But there are clever ways to tailor chocolate cheesecake, mousse and more for a romantic night at home.

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Is Chocolate the New Coffee?

by in Healthy Tips, June 17, 2015

Chocolate lovers have a lot to be happy about lately. New research is emerging all the time about the potential health benefits of this sweet treat. The cacao plant (from which chocolate is made) is a rich source of antioxidants called flavanols. Antioxidants keep you healthy by fending off free radical damage that leads to — among other things — cancer. And flavanols have specific benefits for your heart: They can lower blood pressure, make blood platelets less sticky and improve blood flow — all of which helps prevent heart disease. Read more

War of the Chocolates

by in Healthy Holidays, Valentine's Day, February 12, 2015


Chocolate is the aphrodisiac of choice on Valentine’s Day. But not all varieties of this confection are created equal. Here’s a rundown of the most-lovable options for you and your waistline.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, October 31, 2014

Chocolate
In this week’s nutrition news: another reason to eat chocolate; acid reflux doctor cautions against late-night eating; and nutrition labels are poised for a major makeover.

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When Cravings Call, What Are They Saying?

by in Diets & Weight Loss, August 14, 2014

http://blog.foodnetwork.com/healthyeats/2014/08/14/when-cravings-call-what-are-they-saying/

We all get cravings, but when they come in the form of high-sugar and calorie-dense foods, it’s our waistlines that suffer the consequences. But understanding the messages behind cravings can make it easier to resist the siren call of certain foods.

Why We Crave
One theory as to why we crave specific foods so intensely is that the body is deficient in a nutrient that food contains. For example, we desperately crave potato chips because our body is in need of salt. This theory, unfortunately, lacks scientific evidence to back it up.

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Make Your Own Banana-Chocolate Protein Bar

by in Healthy Recipes, July 25, 2014

protein bars
One sure way to avoid the highly processed add-ins found in many protein bars is to turn out a batch using your own ingredients and a boost of protein powder. A word on that front: You’ll want a protein powder low in added and artificial sweeteners. Whey, which is dairy-based, is one good option, but there are multiple types of powders on the market (some decent, some less than — so it’s wise to take a close look at ingredients).

Banana Chocolate-Chip Protein Bars
Makes 12 bars

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Smoothie of the Month: Chocolate with Coconut and Mint

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, June 3, 2014

chocolate smoothie

Refreshing, ice-cold and perfectly sweet, this drink is actually more like a shake than a smoothie. Made with nut milk and coconut ice cream, it has all of the components of a classic shake but without the dairy — although the coconut ice cream is so rich and creamy, you would never know.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, March 20, 2014

white pot
In this week’s news: Doctors embrace the food-as-medicine concept; chocolate is awesome for a whole new reason; and saturated fat (slowly) comes back into the fold.

Get Me a Spatula, Stat!
Last weekend,the Napa Valley branch of the Culinary Institute of America hosted hundreds of physicians for a medical meeting involving kitchen aprons, not lab coats. The draw was the Healthy Kitchens/Healthy Lives conference, co-sponsored by the Harvard School of Public Health and part of a quickly growing trend of culinary-medical cross-pollination. Come May, for example, Tulane University will debut the country’s first teaching kitchen affiliated with a medical school. In New York, meanwhile, celebrity chefs David Bouley and Seamus Mullen have been working with doctors Mark Hyman and Frank Lipman, respectively, to develop menu items and eating philosophies representing a drool-worthy intersection of pantry and pharmacy. (Wild mushrooms with white truffle, sweet garlic, grilled toro and coconut foam, anyone?) Fueling the trend is some pretty delicious research: In one recent study of a nonprofit program, patients whose doctors wrote them “prescriptions” to redeem at local farmers markets saw their BMI drop by an average of 37.8% in a single year.

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