Tag: chia

5 Ingredients: Chia Pudding

by in 5-Ingredient Recipes, April 4, 2013

chia pudding
Love chia seeds? This easy-to-make, creamy pudding is bursting with fiber, omega-3 fat and tropical flavors.

What is Chia Pudding?
One of the most magical characteristics of tiny chia seeds is how they can act as an thickening agent. When introduced to liquid such as milk, soy milk, almond milk or coconut milk, the seeds expand and soften, creating a pudding-like concoction. Create a mixture of your favorite flavors and after a few hours in the fridge, indulge in the velvety goodness.

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Chia Seeds 101

by in Healthy Tips, March 3, 2013

chia seeds
Back in 2009 we started reporting on this hot new food. Since then, these tiny, crunchy seeds have experienced a popularity explosion. It’s time to catch you up on how far chia has come.

Chia Facts
One tablespoon of chia seeds has 55 calories, 2 grams protein and 6 grams of fiber, plus calcium, iron and potassium. They’re also gluten and cholesterol free.

According to the nutrition facts panels, the fat content of different brands of chia seeds varies from 3 to 9 grams per tablespoon. The type of fat found in these tiny seeds is mostly polyunsaturated, specifically the ALA omega-3 type – brands vary from 2,000 to 6,000 milligrams per serving.

Research indicates the ALA form of omega-3 needs to be converted to DHA and EPA forms in order to benefit heart health (something omega-3s are famous for). Some recent reports have indicated that milled chia seeds allow for better ALA conversion, though it’s still unclear if this makes chia better for heart health.

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7 Foods With the Most Omega-3s

by in Healthy Recipes, July 26, 2012

walnuts Most folks are hip to the fact that they need more omega-3 fats in their diet, but that doesn’t mean they’re actually eating enough. Here’s a refresher on why omega-3s do the body good and some delish recipes to boost your intake.

Health Benefits
There are 3 main types of omega-3 fats that are typically referred to by their abbreviated names DHA, EPA and ALA. The DHA and EPA types are plentiful in fish and help fight inflammation. They also contribute to heart health, brain function and immunity. If that’s not enough, they also help with healthy joints, skin, eyes and skin. The ALA type of omega-3 is found mostly in plant-based foods. Once eaten, the body converts ALA to a small amount of DHA and EPA. ALA-rich foods are good for you for a variety of reasons but to really reap the benefits of omega-3, you want to make sure to get most of them from EPA and DHA.

Foods
Experts recommend getting about 1,000 milligrams of omega-3s per day, mostly from DHA and EPA.

Salmon
Salmon is one of the best fish choices for healthy fats. A 4-ounce (raw) portion will serve up more than 1600 milligrams of DHA and EPA.

Recipe: Blackened Salmon With Mango Salsa

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Reading List: Top 5 Overrated Food Trends, McDonald's Food Safety & A Dating Site Scandal

by in Food News, January 8, 2010

In this week’s nutrition news: New health goals for Americans, McDonald’s excellent food-safety standards and how small changes can keep diabetes at bay.

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A Hot New Food: Chia Seed

by in Food News, June 17, 2009

chiapet
One of the latest “superfoods” is actually a blast from the past! Remember Chia Pet, the fuzzy novelty plants that were popular in the ‘80s? Well, the sprouts that grow out of those pottery figurines come from germinated chia seeds. These days, the seeds are popular in the health food arena, but are they worth the hype?

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