Tag: chefs

The Chefs’ Take: Parsnips

by in Chefs and Restaurants, January 10, 2017

A thick, taupe-hued version of the ubiquitous, snack-friendly carrot, the parsnip is an unsung root vegetable seldom eaten raw. Then winter arrives, and its nutty profile deservedly gets the spotlight in a barrage of hearty soups and braises. But, there are other clever ways to celebrate the parsnip’s complexity this season.

Five nights a week, chef/owner Nicolas Delaroque of Nico in San Francisco serves a five-course tasting menu. Inevitably, parsnips make a cameo this time of the year. “I enjoy their versatility. We can use them in so many types of cooking,” he explains. That’s why he embraces the vegetable’s floral notes and incorporates them into a dessert. One splurge-worthy scoop of brown butter ice cream is dressed with fried parsnip chips and wood sorrel. “Parsnips have a sweet disposition, and with the cozy, warm feel of maple and bourbon, it just makes sense on a cold day.” Read more

The Chef’s Take: Chestnuts

by in Chefs and Restaurants, December 11, 2016

Nat King Cole first started crooning about chestnuts roasting on an open fire in the 1940s, and the nostalgic scent of these plump, shiny beauties wafting from street corners remains a comforting symbol amid the frenetic swirl of holiday shopping and shindigs December usually promises.

Simply baking the chestnuts (don’t forget to score each one and give them a good soak before opening that oven door) is a surefire way to please guests, as is folding them into stuffing or using them to dot a chocolate cake. But chestnuts are rather versatile, which means chefs around the country are also using chestnuts to lend a festive touch to their winter dishes.

For Greg Guevin, chef at Russell House Tavern in Cambridge, Massachusetts, it was boredom of “the grilled vegetable platter ubiquitous to restaurants, the generic default option that gets no love” that led to him reach for chestnuts. His imaginative lasagna (pictured above) shuns pasta noodles for sheets of shaved potato that are layered with a blend of roasted chestnuts and root vegetables like carrots and parsnips. “The sweetness of the chestnuts makes the dish,” he says. Guevin amplifies it with a deep cremini mushroom-garlic-thyme jus deglazed with red wine “that helps keep the lasagna light,” he says. He then sparingly covers the “pasta” with a pecorino Mornay sauce, essentially a cheesy bechamel. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Ivy Stark’s Salmon a la Plancha

by in Dining Out, July 5, 2015

When dining out at Dos Caminos, the upbeat Mexican restaurant with outposts in New York, Atlantic City and Fort Lauderdale, chances are the table is graced with warm tortilla chips, chorizo fundido and asada tacos. The feast, however, need not be a gluttonous one. Consider executive chef and marathon runner Ivy Stark’s Salmon a la Plancha, one of the restaurant’s dishes that was featured as a lighter option in honor of National Nutrition Month in March but is now a permanent menu staple. The salmon is accompanied by lemon-herb quinoa and oven-roasted tomato-black olive salsa spiked with pickled jalapenos.

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Healthy Summer Entertaining Tips from Celebrity Caterer Peter Callahan (Plus Mini Caprese Tea Sandwiches)

by in Healthy Recipes, July 2, 2015

Backyard barbecues and outdoor entertaining are in full swing just in time for Fourth of July celebrations. Hot dogs, hamburgers, and bowls of chips and dips are an easy fix for a summer fest, but there are plenty of easy ways to keep things wholesome and healthy when entertaining in the great outdoors. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Sweet Potato Tacos at A.W.O.L.

by in Dining Out, June 1, 2015

Typically, the sight of sweet potatoes on the dinner table leaves us dreaming of lavish Thanksgiving Day feasts. But at A.W.O.L. (that stands for All Walks of Life) Eatery, a funky restaurant celebrating farm-fresh ingredients in New York’s Williamsburg neighborhood, spicy sweet potato tacos — sans the company of cranberry sauce and mashed potatoes — may make an appearance on the daily-changing menu amid even the sultriest of temperatures. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Slow-Cooked Salmon with Green Romesco from Morimoto

by in Dining Out, April 27, 2015

While many diners make a reservation at Morimoto New York solely for Masaharu Morimoto’s exquisite sushi, it would behoove them to also spring for one of his warm Western-inspired creations. At this minimalist Japanese restaurant in the Meatpacking District — one of several in Iron Chef Morimoto’s expansive culinary empire — a slab of king salmon accompanied by splashes of piquant green romesco sauce, charred lily bulbs, green almonds and shiso is a light and vibrant reflection of the season. “This dish is not found in a typical Japanese restaurant because it doesn’t use any soy sauce. The green romesco has a spicy kick, which pairs nicely with the tender, slow-cooked salmon,” Morimoto explains. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Dave Pasternack’s Roasted Funghi with Herbed Goat Cheese at Barchetta

by in Dining Out, April 10, 2015

Dave Pasternack must have seawater in his veins. When he’s not facing the stove, he’s on the open water, fishing rod in hand, mining the ocean for its finest creatures. His passion as a fisherman and a chef earned him the title “the fish whisperer” from Frank Bruni.

It’s no surprise that at his newest restaurant, Barchetta — Italian for “little boat” — seafood is once again hoisted to center stage. It’s here that freshness reigns, whether it’s a just-caught halibut from the Pacific, flown in a few hours before dinner, or a local striped bass caught by Pasternack himself. Read more

Chef Dan Barber on Why “Whole-Farm Eating” Is the New “Farm-to-Table”

by in Chefs and Restaurants, June 14, 2014

the third plate
You may not be eating a lot of mustard greens, kidney beans and millet these days, but if Dan Barber has his way, you will be very soon.

Barber is the award-winning chef of Blue Hill, an elegant respite for sustainable cuisine in New York City’s West Village, and Blue Hill Stone Barns, a locavore’s paradise located within the nonprofit farm Stone Barns Center for Food & Agriculture in Tarrytown, NY. Since his early days as a cook, he’s been a pioneering advocate for the farm-to-table movement. But in his revolutionary new book, The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food, Barber reexamines the farm-to-table movement, and comes away from it a new man, one championing the whole farm, not just what’s most prized for the table.

“For all its successes, farm-to-table has not, in any fundamental way, reworked the economic and political forces that dictate how our food is grown and raised,” wrote Barber in a recent Op-Ed in the New York Times. “Big Food is getting bigger, not smaller. In the last five years, we’ve lost nearly 100,000 farms (mostly midsize ones). Today, 1.1 percent of farms in the United States account for nearly 45 percent of farm revenues.”

His solution? Eat more cowpea. Seriously. Instead of cherry-picking crops like tomatoes, strawberries, asparagus and other blockbusters that deplete soil of their most crucial nutrients, Barber proposes we start supporting more humble offerings like buckwheat, cowpea, barley, and mustard greens — which are often used by farmers to enrich the soil in rotation with those A-list vegetables.

The “first plate,” argues Barber, was a classic meal centered on meat with a few vegetables. That gave way to the “second plate,” a new ideal of organic grass-fed meats and local vegetables. Now, he proposes a “third plate”— a new way of eating that’s rooted in cooking with and celebrating the whole farm: vegetables, grains and a smidge of protein. It’s a juicy new holistic approach to food and farming that’s bound to put Barber in the company of legendary food policy gurus like Alice Waters, Michael Pollan and Eric Schlosser.

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The Chef’s Take: Corn, Summer Squash and Avocado Salad from Suzanne Goin

by in Chefs and Restaurants, June 4, 2014

corn salad

“Being a chef is strange,” says Suzanne Goin. “Throughout service, I taste a lot of food to make sure it tastes and looks right. So, I’m not really eating for pleasure most of the time. I’m eating what I need to for my job.”

Though Goin, who co-owns six Los Angeles eateries (Lucques and A.O.C. among them) and a wholesale bakery, rarely gets to eat strictly as her heart desires, sampling this sweet corn, summer squash, sliced avocado and watercress salad never feels like an occupational hazard. “I create salads that I want to eat all the time,” Goin says.

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The Chef’s Take: Swordfish Kebabs from Jimmy Bradley

by in Chefs and Restaurants, May 21, 2014

swordfish kebabs
With Memorial Day around the corner and grill season afoot, these rosemary-skewered swordfish kebabs are just the ticket. Not only are they light and richly flavored, but they also come together in a snap.

Don’t let the unfussy preparation, which involves nothing more complicated than making a citrus-herb marinade, fool you into thinking the fish dish stints on taste. The resulting flavors are nuanced and sophisticated. Rosemary branches that pierce the fish perfume the kebabs, and the swordfish, with texture reminiscent of a steak, stands up to the herb’s signature aroma. Once the smoke from the grill works its way into the mix, the result is bewitching.

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