Tag: brussels sprouts

The 10 Best Comeback Foods (and the Chefs Who Love Them)

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Trends, August 28, 2014

brussels sprout
They used to be the stuff that fueled childhood nightmares: forkfuls of overcooked broccoli or endless orbs of bitter Brussels sprouts that had to be endured in order to tackle, finally, the chocolate ice cream. But today’s renditions of green vegetables don’t require nose-holding or the camouflage of cheese in order to win over legions of fans. From the once-maligned spinach that only Popeye fancied to the leafy kale that went on to wildly successful oversaturation, here’s a passel of formerly shunned vegetables (and a few equally undesirable fruits) that chefs have helped give miraculous makeovers. Read more

A Salad and a Meal, All In One: Wheat Berries and Brussels Sprouts

by in The Grain Attraction, May 17, 2014

wheat berry salad

I don’t know about you, but if I’m eating a salad as a meal, I want it to have some heft. I can’t last until my next meal on mixed greens alone. Enter wheat berries and Brussels sprouts. Together with some nuts and cheese, they make tasty a salad filled with protein and fiber, which does wonders for satiety.

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12 Delicious Brussels Sprouts Recipes

by in In Season, October 26, 2013

brussels sprouts
Studies have found that these members of the cabbage family, which are now in season, may help reduce the risk of cancer. Pick up a bunch on your next trip to the market, and show them off in any of these recipes.

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Beer Brussels Sprouts

by in Gluten-Free, Healthy Recipes, March 15, 2013

brussels sprouts
When you think of St. Patrick’s Day, what comes to mind? The color green? Beer? Leprechauns? Well, this recipe has St. Paddy’s Day written all over it. These Brussels sprouts are doused in beer to give them a savory, hoppy taste (made with gluten-free beer so if you have a gluten sensitivity you can still enjoy them). I love roasting and steaming veggies to get food on the table fast, but I decided to create this recipe on the stovetop. You can also toss all of the ingredients into a baking dish and bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees F if you prefer to roast them. There are only 5 pantry staples in this recipe so you’ll have these sprouts on the table with minimal effort.

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Raw Kale and Brussels Sprout Salad

by in Healthy Recipes, February 7, 2013

brussels sprout salad

I often find myself cravings salads even in the heart of these cold winter months. In an attempt to nourish my body with seasonal ingredients I have been gravitating towards winter greens. This salad pairs raw lacinato kale with shredded Brussels sprouts, seasonal fruit and a few nuts for crunch. Not sure about raw kale?  I say give this salad a try. It has been a life-changer for several people in my world.

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Brussels Sprouts, 5 Ways

by in 1 Food, 5 Ways, December 2, 2012

Brussels sprouts
Seasonal, delicious and oh so good for you. My holiday table wouldn’t be complete without this cruciferous super food.

Roasted
The simplest side dish imaginable – roasted and done!
Recipe: Roasted Brussels Sprouts (pictured above)

Sautéed
Shred and sauté with crunchy walnuts and a hint of smoky bacon.
Recipe: Brussels Sprouts With Bacon and Walnuts

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Honey-Glazed Brussels Sprouts

by in Thanksgiving, November 19, 2012

Even kids will eat Brussels sprouts when they are slathered in a sweet dressing! This recipe is a great way to bring a bit of green to your holiday table. You can enjoy these Brussels sprouts as is, or add them to a medley of Roasted Vegetables such as cauliflower, broccoli, parsnips and carrots. The sweet aroma from these sprouts will even tempt the pickiest of eaters. You can also toss these Brussels sprouts with quick-cooking quinoa for an easy protein-packed gluten-free side dish.

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Seasonal Ingredient Apothecary

by in Healthy Recipes, October 14, 2012

beet and apple salad
Eating seasonally is a delicious option for many reasons. Not only are you getting produce at the peak of its flavor, you are also getting it at the peak of its nutrition. While it can be sad to see the summer tomatoes, berries and corn disappear from the market, fall brings its own delicious bounty to the table and each seasonal ingredient is packed with nutrients that do your body good. Food is medicine. Food nourishes. That’s why we eat, right?  Fall and winter produce offerings often match the colors of the season and those colors boast a variety of good-for-you nutrients. Here is a breakdown of ingredients the season has to offer and why you should be eating it.

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Parmesan Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Smoked Paprika

by in Robin's Healthy Take, September 17, 2012

brussels sproutsYou must admit, Brussels sprouts are cute. They resemble baby cabbages and their flavor is reminiscent of their  popular cousin, broccoli. But they’re often snubbed. Why? My guess is, Brussels sprout-haters have, at some point, eaten them when they weren’t cooked correctly. Brussels sprouts taste horrible when they’re over-cooked. When cooked properly, the sprouts are bright green, fork-tender and wonderful. Especially the way I make them, roasted with Parmesan cheese and smoked paprika. Read on…

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Cancer Prevention: Cruciferous Veggies

by in Healthy Recipes, Healthy Tips, February 4, 2012
broccoli
Broccoli is loaded with cancer-fighting plant chemicals.

In honor of World Cancer Day, we’re focusing on cruciferous veggies—those from the cabbage family. Studies show that these vegetables have a special plant chemical that protects against cancer. Here are some ideas on how to incorporate them into your everyday eating plan.

The Power
Cruciferous vegetables include cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, turnips, kale, and Brussels sprouts. These superstar veggies are packed with so many nutrients it’s tough to keep count. They contain fiber, vitamins A and C, riboflavin, B6, folic acid, magnesium, potassium and omega-3 fats. What’s more, they also have plant chemicals known as glucosinolates that have been shown to help reduce the risk of various types of cancer.

A 2011 study in the International Journal of Urology found that the more veggies that were eaten from the cabbage family, the lower the risk was from prostate cancer. According to the American Institute for Cancer Research, studies also link the various components in cruciferous veggies to helping reduce the risk of colorectal, esophageal, stomach, mouth and pancreatic cancer.

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