Tag: bread

Apple Oatmeal Breakfast Bread

by in Uncategorized, September 4, 2016

Many people know that a bowl of oatmeal is one healthy way to start the day. But why? There’s a lot of nutrition packed into that bowl of goodness, including whole-grain oats, spicy cinnamon and usually fruit and nuts on top. I set out to create a quick bread that had all the nourishment of a bowl of oatmeal — but that would be easy to slice and take with you. Here’s what I mixed up:

Oats — All dry oatmeal varieties, from quick oats to steel-cut oats, are whole grains. They are also full of fiber — soluble fiber, which has been shown to lower cholesterol when consumed in the amount of about two bowls of oatmeal per day.
Walnuts — These nuts have more of the essential plant-based Omega-3 fat AHA than any other nut. An ounce of walnuts also has 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber.

Apples — In season now, apples are packed with the flavonol quercetin. This plant-derived antioxidant acts as an antihistamine and may protect against heart disease.

Cinnamon — This spice may help keep blood sugar levels in check in people with diabetes, although not every study has shown this.
Eggs — Yes, eggs. I always add an egg or two to a pot of oatmeal to make it extra creamy. In this bread, eggs are added to increase the protein and vitamin D content. If you’re not really a “morning person,” vitamin D may help improve your mood. One egg has nearly 10 percent of the daily value for vitamin D — and may help you put on a happy face at any time of day. Read more

How Local Can You Get? Bread  

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, May 29, 2016

Despite their unavoidable convenience factor, commercially baked breads often fall short when it comes to flavor and nutrition. Now that I’ve been sourcing local baked goods, I’ve all but given up on the grocery store bread aisle. Here are some tips to bring more local breads into your kitchen; you’ll support local businesses and get more nutritious options at the same time.

Making your own bread isn’t really as difficult as it is time consuming. Budgeting time for the dough to rise (and then rise a second time) does take some getting used to, but the payoff is having complete control over the ingredients. A homemade recipe gives you the ability to lower the sodium and sugar content, while increasing the whole grains. From whole wheat to rye, sourdough to gluten-free breads — bakers’ catalogs offer a wide variety of ingredients and equipment to help bring out your inner baker. Instead of relying on only traditional yeast-leavened breads, add recipes for quick breads and pizza dough to your repertoire as well. Read more

Is Bread No Longer an Enemy?

by in Food News, May 2, 2016

Ever since the dawn of the low-carb craze, bread has been on the outs. Diners ask for the breadbasket to be removed from their tables at restaurants, sandwiches are shunned, and toast is … well, toast. But new research may help prove that bread has been unfairly demonized, and that the loaf languishing in your kitchen is not the enemy you once thought.

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Savory Rosemary Goat Cheese Quick Bread

by in Healthy Recipes, January 16, 2016

It’s soup season, and serving homemade bread makes even ordinary soup from a can taste better. This savory quick bread lives up to its “quick bread” name in that it mixes up in a jiffy and requires no yeast rising time.

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10 Uses for Frozen Bread Dough

by in Uncategorized, March 18, 2013

bread dough
Frozen bread dough is a quick cook’s best friend – especially when you think outside the traditional 1 pound baked-loaf-box.

1. Parmesan, Garlic & Herb Dinner Rolls: Divide the dough into 16 equal pieces and shape the pieces into balls/rolls. Place the rolls on a baking sheet that’s been coated with cooking spray. Spray the rolls with cooking spray and then sprinkle with grated parmesan cheese and salt-free garlic and herb seasoning. Bake at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes, until the rolls are golden brown.

2. Calzones: Roll the dough out into a large circle, about 1/2-inch thick. Top one side of dough with shredded mozzarella cheese, mixed vegetables and pasta sauce. Fold over the untopped side and pinch the edges together to seal. Transfer the calzone to a baking sheet that’s been coated with cooking spray. Bake at 400 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until golden brown.

3. Deep Dish Pizzas: Divide the dough in half and press each half into the bottom and slightly up the sides of two 9-inch cake pans. Top with pizza sauce, shredded cheese and toppings. Bake at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes.

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Food Fight: Multigrain vs. Whole Wheat Bread

by in Uncategorized, September 20, 2012

Terms like “whole wheat” and “multi-grain” are often used interchangeably, but they aren’t actually the same thing. Here’s a closer look into each, plus the winner of this food fight.

Understanding Whole Grains
Before delving into this battle, we need to settle on the term whole grain. All grains are made of 3 parts: the large endosperm (with protein and carbs), the germ (with fat and B-vitamins) and the outer bran (with fiber and vitamins). When a food is labeled as 100% whole grain, this means that the entire grain (all 3 parts) is left intact. When the food is refined or milled (like in white bread), this means the bran and most of the germ has been removed during processing.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that at least half the grain you consume daily should come from whole grains. To do so, choose 100% whole grain over refined bread varieties.

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8 Surprising Sources of Sugar

by in Grocery Shopping, Healthy Tips, February 29, 2012
Is there sugar hiding in your groceries?

Move over salt, there’s a new bad guy in town: sugar. We know that sweet treats and heavily processed food tends to be laden with sugar, but you’ll be shocked to find out that these 8 common foods that contain more sugar than you think.

The Guidelines

The American Heart Association recommends that women limit their added sugar to no more than 6 teaspoons (or 100 calories) while men shouldn’t consume more than 9 teaspoons (or 150 calories) each day. Americans blow these recommendations out of the water, consuming an average of 475 calories of added sugar each day! So take a good look at your pantry to see if you’re eating any of these hidden sources of sugar.

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Fall Fest: Pumpkins 5 Ways

by in Healthy Recipes, October 13, 2010
Alton's Pumpkin Bread
Alton Brown's Seed-Studded Pumpkin Bread

We’re teaming up with other food and garden bloggers to host Fall Fest 2010, a season-long garden party. Each week we’ll feature favorite garden-to-table recipes and tips to help you enjoy the bounty, whether you’re harvesting your own goodies or buying them fresh from the market. To join in, check out awaytogarden.com.

This weekend we took the kids to a pumpkin patch and they absolutely loved it! Now we have lots of pumpkins, and need to put them to good use. Here are 5 recipes I can’t wait to use with fresh (or canned) pumpkin.

See all 5 recipes, plus more pumpkin ideas »

Dressing Up Day-Old Bread

by in Healthy Recipes, March 17, 2010

Pesto Crostini
There’s nothing better than freshly baked bread, but when it’s preservative-free, fresh bread dries out quickly. The dilemma: You may not use the whole loaf in one day and whatever is left is too good to toss. Get more mileage out of that extra bread with these ideas.

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Meet This Grain: Spelt

by in Healthy Recipes, August 27, 2009

Spelt Bread and Pasta
This grain has more protein, B-vitamins and iron than its cousin wheat. Have you experimented with it in your baking? Get started.

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