Tag: added sugar

Why Should We Care About Added Sugar?

by in Food News, June 9, 2016

The biggest buzz surrounding the revamped Nutrition Facts label recently unveiled at the Partnership for a Healthier America Summit is the news that added sugars (not just total sugars) will be required on food packaging. “‘Added sugar’ means anything that’s used to sweeten a product beyond any sugars that occur naturally in that food,” explains Libby Mills, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. And once that info is on the label in black and white, you’ll no longer be able to kid yourself into thinking added sugars are found only in sweets, sodas and baked goods. “Sugar is added to a variety of ‘healthy’ foods — including salad dressing, tomato sauce, soups, breads and yogurt,” says Mills. “Places you wouldn’t necessarily expect to find it.”

The problem with added sugar is that it’s basically adding empty calories to whatever you’re eating. “You’re getting the calories without much nutrition to go with it,” says Mills. “And that can contribute to weight gain, tooth decay, diabetes and numerous other health issues. The American Heart Association guidelines call for no more than six teaspoons a day of added sugar for women and nine for men. Read more

Beware of the Low-Sugar Revolution

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, March 21, 2016

If you’re trying to cut out added sugar from your diet, you aren’t alone. Make sure you’re doing it right; get the inside scoop on the sweet stuff.

Read more

Nutrition News: Fiber’s Sleep Effects, Sugar Warning Labels, Coffee and Exercise

by in Food News, January 22, 2016

Eat right, sleep tight

Looking for a good night’s sleep? (Who isn’t?) Try eating foods that are high in fiber. A new study, published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, concludes that eating a high-fiber diet may correlate with sleep that is deeper and more restorative, with few interruptions — it’s called “slow wave sleep” — whereas consuming a diet that is low in fiber and high in saturated fat and sugar has the opposite effect. What’s more, the researchers found, just one day of high-fat, low-fiber eating can negatively affect the quality of your night’s sleep. So you may want to lay off the buttery sugar cookies before bedtime — or have a high-fiber snack instead.

Read more

Are You Eating Too Much Sugar?

by in Healthy Tips, September 9, 2015

Convinced that your consumption of sugar is in check? You may be sorely mistaken. Find out how to be more on top of your sugar intake. Read more

Nutrition News: NYC Salt Proposal, “Healthy” Foods to Skip, Real vs. Artificial Sugar

by in Food News, June 19, 2015

NYC’s Planned Salt Shakeup

During his long reign as mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg introduced public health initiatives, including banning trans fats in food prepared in NYC restaurants and requiring restaurants to post calorie counts. Now, his successor, Mayor Bill de Blasio, has proposed requiring chain restaurants to print a warning symbol (a little salt shaker) next to menu items that contain more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium, the recommended daily intake per U.S. guidelines. The Wall Street Journal reports that restaurants aren’t happy about the plan, which the city’s Board of Health will vote on in September. “Every single ingredient if it’s in excess could obviously cause you problems,” restaurant industry advocate Melissa Fleischut griped to the Journal. “Do we label every ingredient?” Read more

Update: Health Experts Weigh in on Proposed Nutrition Label Redo

by in Food News, July 23, 2014

nutrition facts label
Earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration released details of the proposed nutrition label makeover. Many experts have been weighing in on the new look, trying to determine if the changes will help consumers make better-informed decisions or simply add to widespread confusion about nutrition. Last week, The New England Journal of Medicine published two commentaries from health experts.

Added Sugars, Packaging Buzzwords
The first perspective was written by David A. Kessler, MD, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, author of The End of Overeating and a former FDA commissioner. Kessler believes that the FDA’s proposed changes could help nudge food buyers toward healthier decisions but argues that the new label does not go far enough.

Read more