Blogger Spotlight: Angela Liddon, of Oh She Glows

by in Blogger Spotlight, March 29, 2013
Angela Liddon is the woman behind the award-winning vegan blog, Oh She Glows. After years of struggling with an eating disorder, Angela decided to ditch the scale and pursue a happy, healthy lifestyle. She started Oh She Glows in 2008 as a way to share her story and renewed love of food. As a self-taught food photographer and cook, Angela is now working on her first cookbook, due out in 2014. She is also the founder of the website Green Monster Movement.

Tell us a little bit about the name of your blog.

The name represents the glow that comes from the inside when I’m treating myself well. When I was in recovery from an eating disorder my friend Leah told me I was glowing and that she could tell I was on a healthier path. Her words of encouragement always stuck with me and it became my goal to glow throughout the recovery process. When I was brainstorming blog names, I wanted something that was catchy and had the word glow in it. I first thought of ‘She Glows’, but I discovered that the domain was already taken, so I decided on ‘Oh She Glows’. I’m really glad that I didn’t go with ‘She Glows’ because I feel like Oh She Glows is a great fit. To this day, the name still has a lot of personal meaning in my life and I’m sure it always will.

How were you able to embrace and enjoy food after struggling with your eating disorder?   

Hard work, professional counseling, and learning to have fun in the kitchen were a few things that helped me. For so many years, I relied on processed diet foods because they were low in calories. Once I started learning more about nutrition and the amazing health benefits of eating real, plant-based foods, I was hooked. Not to mention, they taste so much better than anything from a package. I felt so great eating this way and it was all the motivation I needed to stay on this path. I now take great pride in making a lot of my own food. It’s a labor of love.

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Asparagus Spinach Salad With Tahini Dressing

by in Easter, Healthy Recipes, March 28, 2013

asparagus salad
With the weather warming up, and the sun peeking out just a little bit more day by day, our meals are lighter and include more fruits and veggies. For a satisfyingly fresh lunch, I’ve combined fresh spring asparagus and spinach — with nori seaweed as a surprise ingredient — into a lovely spring salad. Instead of store-bought salad dressing I use tahini for creamy flavor and texture. Lemon juice and fresh ginger add bold flavor without excess calories and fat. Slivered almonds provide filling healthy fats to keep you satisfied all afternoon. Bring this salad to an outdoor spring picnic party, or serve it as an Easter side dish. Read more

20 Healthy Easter Side Dishes

by in Easter, Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, March 28, 2013

asparagus recipe
With a bounty of bright spring vegetables popping up in markets and gardens, there’s plenty of fresh produce available to make delicious and eye-appealing veggies to serve at your Easter feast.

Potatoes-A-Plenty
Sweet or white potatoes are both bursting with nutritional goodness including vitamin C. Mash them, top with cheese or roast. The possibilities are endless.

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Easter Egg Safety

by in Easter, Food Safety, Healthy Holidays, March 27, 2013

Easter eggs
Easter wouldn’t be complete without brightly-colored eggs and a full out egg hunt. But who wants to ruin the festivities with spoiled eggs?

Food Safety Basics
Eggs are considered a potentially hazardous food that may cause illness if they’re not handled correctly. Raw and undercooked eggs have been associated with salmonella poisoning. Most folks infected with the salmonella bacteria develop symptoms about 12 to 72 hours after infected. Most people can recover but if symptoms are severe, hospitalization may be required especially in those with a compromised immune system (like the very young and old). Proper handling, cooking, and hand washing can prevent most of the issues.

Keeping Eggs Safe
Egg safety begins at your market and continues until the time when you reserve leftovers.

  • Purchasing: Inspect egg cartons at the market. Don’t purchase cracked or dirty eggs and be sure to check the sell-by date. Eggs should always be refrigerated, even when on display.
  • Storing: Be sure to get those eggs home quickly. They shouldn’t sit at room temperature longer than 2 hours—1 hour if it’s above 90 degrees. Once home, place the eggs in your refrigerator immediately.
  • Preparing: When preparing eggs, wash your hands, any utensils, and surfaces that will come into contact with the eggs. If you’re not sure if the eggs are safe to eat, toss them. Once the equipment is used for the eggs, be sure to wash them with soap and warm water immediately. Don’t use them for another prep task (that’s cross-contamination!).
  • Cooking: Always make sure that your eggs are safe to eat. For hard-boiled (or any cooked) eggs, you want to cook the eggs until both the white and yolk are firm. Learn how to make perfect hard-boiled eggs.
  • Leftovers: Hard-boiled eggs can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. They shouldn’t be frozen.

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Win This Grapeseed Oil!

by in Giveaway, March 27, 2013

Grapeseed Oil

Have you tried grapeseed oil? This healthy fat is extracted from the tiny inner seeds of the same grapes used to produce wine, and it’s perfect for stir frying, sautéing, baking and frying. With a light, nutty taste no cholesterol or transfat, Sadaf grapeseed oil is loaded with Vitamin E and antioxidants.

You can buy your own Sadaf Grapeseed Oil or enter in the comments for a chance to win some. Just let us know, in the comments, what dish you’d love to try with grapeseed oil. The contest starts at 10:00 a.m. EST today, and ends on Friday, March 29 at 5 p.m. EST.

We’re giving away one bottle of Sadaf grapeseed oil to five randomly-selected commenters. You must include your email address in the “Email” field when submitting your comment so we can communicate with you if you’re a winner.

You may only comment once to be considered and you don’t have to purchase anything to win; a purchase will not increase your chances of winning. Odds depend on total number of entries. Void where prohibited. Only open to legal residents of 50 U.S. states, D.C. or Puerto Rico, and you must be at least 18 to win. For the first day of the giveaway, all entries (answers) must be entered between 10:00 a.m. EST on March 27 and 5 p.m. EST on March 29, 2013. Subject to full official rules. By leaving a comment on the blog, you acknowledge your acceptance to the Official Rules. ARV of each prize: $20. Sponsor: Scripps Networks, LLC, d/b/a Food Network, 9721 Sherrill Blvd, Knoxville, TN 37932.

So tell us, what dish would you try with grapeseed oil?

Diabetic-Friendly Easter Recipes

by in Easter, Healthy Holidays, March 26, 2013

asparagus
It’s time to start planning your Easter menu and it can be challenging to accommodate relatives with special dietary requests. If cooking for a diabetic is on your to-do list, we’ve got healthy, spring-inspired recipes with 30 grams of carbohydrates (or less) per serving.

Brunch Ideas
How about Easter brunch? That’ll leave you free for more family time and (hopefully) a little time to relax at the end of the day. A spread of breakfast fare, lunch dishes and some veggie-heavy sides will please everyone.

Avocado-Feta Dip
Gina’s Quiche Tartlets
Green Tea Poached Salmon With Ginger Lime Sauce
Arugula Salad With Pesto
Apple and Ham Salad
Roasted Carrots
Asparagus With Tangy-Smoky Dressing (above)

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Reasons to Love Horseradish

by in Healthy Tips, March 25, 2013


Once the gefilte fish hits the table during our Passover feast, about 20 of us start fighting for the horseradish to top it. But this spicy condiment goes far beyond the Passover table.

Horseradish 101
Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a member of the cabbage family and is thought to have originated around 500 B.C. in the Mediterranean. It is one of five bitter herbs traditionally eaten during the Passover feast. In the 1600 and 1700s, Horseradish ale was a very popular drink throughout England and Germany. In the 1700s, German settlers introduced it to the U.S.

Fresh horseradish root is about 6 to 12-inches long with a 3-inch or so width. It is white in color, has a pungent smell and distinct spicy flavor. Many folks prefer prepared horseradish which can be found as white or red varieties at the market. White horseradish is preserved in vinegar, while red is preserved in beet juice.

Although you can find horseradish grown throughout the world, about 60 percent of the worldwide supply is grown in Illinois.

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Chili-Spiked Edamame

by in Robin's Healthy Take, March 25, 2013

edamame
Edamame, or soybeans in the pod, shouldn’t be relegated to date night at your local Japanese joint. With just 120 calories per serving (1/2 cup shelled or about 1 1/8 cups in the pod), edamame packs a powerful nutrient punch. In fact, it’s so crammed with fiber, you’d have to eat 10 cups of chopped Romaine to get the fiber found in 1/2 cup of edamame (9 grams). The little legumes are also loaded with protein (11 grams/serving), iron (unusual for a plant food) and vitamins A and C, two very potent antioxidants. Check out my fiery way to serve them in the recipe below. I typically use the microwave-ready, steamable, frozen bags of edamame and I used those to test this recipe. Let me know what you think! Read more

Make Your Own Chocolate-Covered Matzo

by in Healthy Holidays, March 24, 2013

chocolate-covered matzo
When I was a little girl, chocolate-covered matzo was a prized dessert. With 5 siblings and a dad who all love chocolate, it was tough to get a piece! As a mom, instead of purchasing store-bought for my family I make my own and jazz it up with some fun kosher-for-Passover flavors.

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Ask the Experts: Change a Habit, Change Your Health, Part 1

by in Ask the Experts, March 23, 2013

vegetables on scale
“If you could recommend just one habit that someone should start doing to eat, and live, healthier, what would that habit be?”

That’s the question I posed to a group of my colleagues – registered dietitians and nutritionists – in the trenches coaching and counseling people in the science, and art, of eating better. Rather than focusing on huge overhauls that may not be sustainable (i.e. no carbs, no gluten, no dairy, no alcohol, etc.), I wanted to look for keystone eating habit changes that could have a butterfly effect through the rest of your daily routine and get you the health and fitness results you want.

I was amazed — within 24 hours I had over 60 responses. As I began sorting through the feedback, I realized that many of the recommendations fell into a seven broader categories, which I’ll be summarizing and presenting in two posts.

Buckle up, here are the first four:

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