Cooked Versus Raw: Some Veggies Like the Heat

by in Healthy Tips, April 15, 2015

Talk to raw-food advocates and they’ll insist that food is most nutritious if it never hits temperatures above 116 degrees. However, the theory that vegetables are healthier raw isn’t always true. The nutrients in some vegetables — including the five mentioned below — become more bioavailable, or readily available for your body to absorb, once they’re cooked. Read more

6 Surprising Ways to Use Kefir

by in Healthy Tips, April 14, 2015

Pronounced “keh-FEAR”, this fermented milk drink is expanding in the yogurt aisle. It has vitamins A and D and calcium in amounts comparable to those in milk, making it a good way to help get your daily recommended servings of dairy. Kefir is brimming with gut-friendly bacteria, which help keep your intestines happy. It’s versatile in the kitchen and can be enjoyed in a variety of everyday recipes. Try it these seven ways. Read more

Healthiest Fast Food Breakfasts

by in Dining Out, April 13, 2015

With many Americans eating breakfast on-the-go, fast food joints have been increasing their offerings. You can now find healthy options at almost every menu. Here are five choices for fewer than 4oo calories each. Read more

10 Reasons We’re Still Not Over Kale

by in Healthy Recipes, April 12, 2015

Last week on April Fools’ Day, Ina Garten posted a photo of green-frosted, kale leaf-garnished cupcakes on Instagram with the caption: “These Kale Cupcakes are a healthy twist on one of my favorite cupcake recipes. They look absolutely gorgeous and are the perfect treat for spring! And the best part is, they’re so delicious kids won’t even guess that there’s a vegetable hidden inside.” And I’ll admit it: She totally got me for a second. Ina’s hilarious April fool pretty much sums up how out-of-control the kale trend has become.

But that doesn’t mean we should all turn against kale. It has revolutionized salad for me — the hearty greens make it a much more satisfying meal than romaine or spinach ever did. And it has helped transform the smoothie from a fruity sugar bomb into a snack or breakfast that can actually be good for you. Here are 10 more reasons why we’re still not over this trendy lettuce. Read more

5 Ways Cheese Is Broccoli’s Best Friend

by in Healthy Recipes, April 11, 2015

Broccoli and Cheddar-Stuffed Potato SkinsIf you’re asking me, broccoli and cheese go together just like peanut butter and jelly or milk and cookies. When creamy melted cheese, particularly cheddar, crosses with the green vegetable, a little magic happens. Of course, adding a little dusting of cheese can punch up nearly anything, but these recipes prove that broccoli and cheese share a beautiful union that can’t be denied (and still manages to be healthy). Though the mention of cheese might raise a few red flags for the health buff, broccoli and cheddar share a friendship of good influences, as a little dose of the good stuff sure goes a long way. Especially if getting your little ones to eat this cruciferous vegetable is a nightly challenge, uniting it with a much-loved indulgence is a sure-fire way to please. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Dave Pasternack’s Roasted Funghi with Herbed Goat Cheese at Barchetta

by in Dining Out, April 10, 2015

Dave Pasternack must have seawater in his veins. When he’s not facing the stove, he’s on the open water, fishing rod in hand, mining the ocean for its finest creatures. His passion as a fisherman and a chef earned him the title “the fish whisperer” from Frank Bruni.

It’s no surprise that at his newest restaurant, Barchetta — Italian for “little boat” — seafood is once again hoisted to center stage. It’s here that freshness reigns, whether it’s a just-caught halibut from the Pacific, flown in a few hours before dinner, or a local striped bass caught by Pasternack himself. Read more

Nutrition News: What Kind of Vegan Are You, Eggs and Diabetes, Brain Benefits of Leafy Greens

by in Food News, April 10, 2015

All Vegans Are Not Equal

Which kind of vegan do you think is more likely to stick to the diet: those who eschew animal products for ethical reasons or those who do it for health reasons? Ticktock … ticktock … Time’s up! The answer is ethical vegans. According to a study recently published in the journal Appetite and cited by Time, people who are vegans for ethical reasons follow the diet for about eight years, on average, and are also more likely to eat soy and vitamin supplements. Those who go vegan for health reasons, by contrast, stick to the diet for about five-and-a-half years, but they do eat more fruits and fewer sweets than ethical vegans.

Read more

6 Tips for Less-Stress Family Dinners

by in Cooking for Kids, April 9, 2015

Is there anything better than an evening around an energetic table with friends, loud chatter and home-cooked grub? I do love hitting a new hot spot, but an old-fashioned potluck is truly the way I love to roll most. Recently I was in charge of bringing apps and dessert and was reminded that the dad-host is a lactose-intolerant paleo eater and the mom-host is gluten-free. Rex helped me prep veggies and we made mini kebab-on-toothpick appetizers and a pile of crudites with guacamole. Maizy whipped up five-ingredient coconut bites and a fruit salad. We showed up with our pile of eats and had quite the memorable eve. Only, we’ll remember it more for the stress and complicated menu, not the snarf that kid-host let out when Maizy told everyone at the table why the chicken crossed the road. Read more

Taste Test: The Battle of the Almond Butters

by in Taste Test, April 8, 2015

 

PB&J has gotten an adult makeover. These days, peanut butters are being crowded off the supermarket shelves by almond butters. They’re a great alternative for those with peanut allergies. Aside from being lower in saturated fats than most other nut butters, almond butter has nutrients like magnesium and potassium, and provides more calcium, iron and vitamin E. If that doesn’t make you a convert, maybe the fact that almond butter is also ridiculously delicious will.

We tasted five brands, judging them on a scale of 1 to 5 (with 5 being the best) for taste, texture and value, to help you make an informed decision the next time you’re standing in the grocery aisle. Watch out for added sugars: Each of these brands has between one and four grams of sugar per serving (two tablespoons is standard), making them good choices for your spread. Read more