Summer Sips: Which Are the Healthiest of the Bunch?

by in Grocery Shopping, July 2, 2014

summer drinks
Looking for something refreshingly fun to beat the heat this summer? Check out these sensible sippers. Read more

Smoothie of the Month: Frozen Peach and Ginger

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, July 1, 2014

peach smoothie
Nothing says summer like fragrant, juicy peaches. Their sweet, tangy flesh also makes the ideal base for a variety of summer smoothies.

Peaches have a subtle flavor that can easily be masked by stronger ones, so if you want the peach to shine, stick to ingredients that enhance their floral quality.

Here, I add a pinch of fresh ginger, vanilla and a touch of honey — along with soaked cashews, which create a velvety texture when blended with fruit. Freezing the peaches beforehand results in an ultra-thick and creamy smoothie that goes down well on hot, humid days.

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Taste Test: Which Hot Dogs Are the Top Dogs?

by in Taste Test, June 30, 2014

hot dogs
With the season of backyard food fests in full swing, Healthy Eats vetted the most popular hot dog brands around to see which ones deserve a coveted spot on the grill grates. Find out which frank emerged as top dog.

The Criteria
We rated beef wieners on a 5-point scale (5 being highest), judging the dogs on taste, ingredient quality and nutrition and paying special attention to calories, fat and sodium. We stuck with regular franks instead of the reduced-fat versions, as many of those use a considerable amount of fillers made from potato starch to displace some of the meat (no thank you). We were also on the lookout for the presence of preservatives such as sodium nitrite. Hot dogs ranged in size from 42 to 57 grams (1.5 to 2 ounces) per piece.  Read more

7 Summer Sides That Will Make Everyone Happy

by in Healthy Recipes, June 29, 2014

quinoa

Throw a bash these days, and you’ll likely be faced with a barrage of requests from friends who are gluten-free, dairy-free, meat-free — you name it. But that doesn’t mean these guests are fun-free! Whatever your pals’ eating styles, they will be primed to party (and think you are the Best Host Ever) when you serve one of these dishes.

For the (Gluten-Free) Quinoa-tarian: Quinoa Salad (above)
Here, the gluten-free king of the grain aisle gets tossed with cubes of cucumber, red onion, and tomato in a simple oil-vinegar-lemon dressing. Fresh mint and parsley add bright flavor, and when the salad is spooned into endive spears with diced avocado, the whole thing becomes a party on a platter.

For the Flexitarian: Creamy Broccoli Salad
A little bit of bacon goes a long way in this tasty side — good news for friends who are trying to cut back on meat, especially the processed variety. Two strips of crisp bacon are finely chopped before being tossed with the broccoli, onions and golden raisins. Buttermilk, reduced-fat sour cream, lemon and bacon drippings form the irresistible dressing.
broccoli salad

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DIY Hummus from the Silk Road Vegetarian Cookbook

by in Cookbooks, June 28, 2014

hummus
These days, it’s all the rage to join a community supported agriculture plan, or CSA. But as recently as 2008, it wasn’t quite as easy. That was the year Dahlia Abraham-Klein, frustrated with the lack of locally sourced food in her Long Island, NY, town, gathered enough signatures to start a CSA out of her garage.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, June 27, 2014

french fries
In this week’s news: Restaurant chains phase out salt on the sly; the buzz on edible insects keeps growing; and doctors confess to being clueless about nutrition.

Sodium Levels? Nothing to See Here. 
Until recently, a meal of chicken, stuffing, cornbread and mashed potatoes at Boston Market would have contained about 2,590 mg of salt — or 290 mg more than U.S. guidelines recommend for an entire day. Today, that same dinner tallies up at 2,000. Facing increasing pressure to make products healthier, the restaurant chain has quietly cut down on salt content in many of its dishes. The food giant is far from the only one: Hamburger Helper, Oreo cookies and McDonald’s french fries are just some of the items that have been “stealth health”-ified. You read right. Consumers may know that healthier food options are a good thing, but that doesn’t mean that they’re always excited to partake. Case in point: When McDonald’s started cooking without harmful trans fats, it was flooded with complaints of the fries tasting different — and not in a good way. As a result of such episodes, many brands are trying to make changes on the sly. Nevertheless, even though General Mills went the quiet route, slowly reducing sodium in Hamburger Helper by 50 percent over a six-year period, the product’s sales have been in steady decline since the salt reduction began.

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The Smartest Ways to Buy and Store Summer Produce

by in In Season, June 26, 2014

apricots
How you pick and store summer fruits can mean the difference between mealy disappointment and juicy perfection.

Berries
Buying: Turn to these antioxidant-packed fruits for a burst of sweet-tart flavor and vitamin C. When shopping for strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries, look for plump and well-shaped pieces that are brightly colored and firm.

Storing: Berries can be stored at room temperature for about 1 to 2 days. After that, get more mileage by keeping them in the fridge. Wash just before using and dry gently with a paper towel. Want to freeze berries? Use these tips.

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Embracing a New Old-Fashioned Take on Healthy Eating

by in Cookbooks, June 25, 2014

nourished kitchen cover
Sustainable. Gorgeous. Rich in nutrients. These are three ways The Nourished Kitchen captures the fresh and simple elegance of food. In her new cookbook, blogger and real-food proponent Jennifer McGruther — who favors the likes of bone-enriched broths and fermented goods — entices readers to once again get their hands dirty in the kitchen.

What are you growing in your garden this year?
This time of the year, we’re just starting our garden, as mountain living means that snow can linger into June and arrive again in September.  This year, my family is planning to plant lettuce, hearty greens, radishes, carrots and a wide variety of mints. Chocolate mint and mountain mint are always favorites.

Do you have a favorite seasonal food or dish, something you look forward to every cooking year?
Every season brings something I cherish, some recipe my family looks forward to all year. In summer, it’s true sour pickles, seasoned with dill, garlic and spice. Pickling cucumbers enjoy such a short season. I buy them by the case, pack them into stoneware crocks and ferment them with a spiced brine until they come out sharp, salty and sour. Fall brings quince, and I like to pair it with apples and pears in a simple sauce, or to poach the quince and drop them into flaky pie crusts. In winter, I lean on savory winter squash pies and stews of root vegetables, grass-fed beef and broth. In springtime, it’s lovage soup — all clean and bright in flavor, but still warm enough to take the edge off the cold evenings of spring.

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Breakfast of the Month: Gluten-Free Zucchini Bread

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, June 24, 2014

zucchini bread

Zucchini are available year-round, but the summer growing season brings an abundance of all shapes and sizes of summer squash, from crookneck to pattypan to eight-ball. If you have a garden, you will be inundated with the green and golden vegetables right through October. This flavorful bread offers a great way to bring any type of zucchini or summer squash into your breakfast routine.

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The Beauty of Smoothie Bowls (Yes, They’re Smoothies—in Bowls)

by in Trends, June 23, 2014

smoothie bowl
It’s the new smoothie dilemma: Straw or spoon? Just when you thought the world of liquid meals was complete, along comes something new. The latest trend in purified food: Smoothie bowls. That’s right, these are smoothies, but you eat them out of a bowl. Before you write off this craze as just as change of scenery for your smoothie, there are, apparently, a few key distinctions between an old-style smoothie you drink and the newer, smoothie-in-a-bowl versions.

Besides the obvious difference in how you consume it, smoothie bowls provide the opportunity to get even more creative with liquefied creations. Because smoothie bowls don’t have to be slurped through a straw, cooks have the option to make the concoction as thick as they want — blending in ingredients like seeds, frozen bananas, nut butters or even avocado for added heft and texture.

“Smoothie bowls are essentially more nutrient-dense smoothies, thick enough to eat with a spoon and often topped with fruits, nuts, seeds, muesli or granola,” explains McKel Hill, MS, RD, and creator of the plant-based, whole foods blog Nutrition Stripped. “Think of smoothie bowls as the new cereal — like cereal 2.0.”

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