7 Summer Salads That Put a Fresh Spin on Corn

by in Healthy Recipes, July 21, 2016

Let’s talk about corn. And we don’t mean boxed muffin mixes or the oily hardened batter that separates basic hot dogs from “corn” dogs. We’re talking fresh-off-the-cob kernels of golden summer corn — or “maize,” as it’s known in its native Mexico. After decades of commercialized farming, we’ve come to think of this ubiquitous crop as the bane of our healthy-eating efforts, reduced to greasy convenience foods and high-fructose corn syrup — the insidious sweetening agent hidden in many shelf-stable products. It’s safe to say the crop’s image is in a state of crisis. We’ve forgotten that, in its purest incarnation, this ancient grain was destined for greatness. Take these seven corn salads, for example, each one paired with more peak-season produce, such as juicy tomatoes, sweet bell peppers and fresh basil. This is exactly the kind of corn renaissance we’ve been waiting for.

Fresh Corn Salad
It doesn’t get any fresher than Ina Garten’s crunchy corn salad. Submerging the quick-boiled cobs in an ice bath may seem like a tedious extra step, but we swear by it. Not only does it stop the cooking right away, but it also preserves the beautiful yellow color for your salad.

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5-Ingredient Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Peaches

by in 5-Ingredient Recipes, Healthy Recipes, July 20, 2016

If you’re craving a juicy piece of meat from the grill but still desire a meal with a light finish, give pork tenderloin a try. Ounce for ounce, pork tenderloin is as lean as skinless chicken breast, making it a healthy choice in the meat aisle.

Peaches are in peak season all summer, timed perfectly for grilling. Peaches take on a concentrated, natural sweetness when grilled, as the cooking thickens their juices. To select peaches for grilling, opt for those that yield to gentle pressure when squeezed gently in the palm of the hand, while being free of wrinkled skins. A sweet peachy scent is another giveaway. Avoid using firm peaches, as the pits will be difficult to remove and the flesh will taste tart. Grilled peaches also pair well with chicken or can be enjoyed as a side dish for any barbecue. If you’re looking to spice things up, sprinkle on cinnamon. And for added entertainment, when someone asks you what’s for dinner, in a Southern accent drawl, “Pork ‘n’ peaches.” That’s what I do. Read more

3 Creative Ideas for Grilled Fruit

by in Healthy Recipes, July 19, 2016

Meat, fish, chicken and vegetables aren’t the only foods you can toss on the grill. Fruits like pineapple, strawberries and even watermelon are becoming more popular to fire up too. Here are three fun combinations you can try the next time you’re barbecuing.

Berries
Unless you have a grill basket, berries are easiest to grill when threaded on skewers. Here are the basic steps to follow for killer berry kebabs:

1) Choose your berry: Strawberries are largest and easiest to work with, but you can skewer blueberries and blackberries too.

2) Brush with a sweet flavor: Combine maple or agave syrup with lemon zest and a touch of a neutral oil (like canola or safflower), and brush on the threaded berries.

3) Select an herb: Complement the flavor of berries with mint, basil or lavender. Chop the herb and sprinkle it over your skewers before serving.

4) Grill over a low flame: Berries burn easily, so be sure to grill them over low heat.
Recipe to try: Grilled Strawberry Kebabs with Lemon-Mint Sauce (pictured above) Read more

Hydrating Foods

by in Uncategorized, July 18, 2016

Most people could do a better job of staying hydrated. Counting glasses of H2O is important, but so are the foods you eat. Here’s the lowdown on some in-season foods to perk up your hydration.

Assess Your Hydration
The best way to tell if you’re getting enough fluids is to pay attention to your body. Urination should be frequent and light yellow to clear in color. The more fluid you lose in sweat, the more you should replace. Aim to take in half your body weight in fluid ounces as a baseline – that’s 75 fluid ounces for a 150-pound person. If you exercise, drink more — especially when working out in the heat and humidity.

Fluid-Boosting Foods
In addition to drinking plenty of water, reach for these seasonal foods to help stay hydrated this summer.

Lettuce
Iceberg is low in calories and has one of the highest water contents of any food. Other leafy varieties like romaine and green leaf are also good options.

Get more from: salads and lettuce cups

Watermelon
You can feel the hydration pouring from this melon; it also contains plenty of the antioxidant lycopene. Read more

Arugula Salad with Peaches, Sorghum, Almonds and Lemon-Honey Vinaigrette

by in Healthy Recipes, Vegan, July 17, 2016

This arugula and peach salad is like summer sunshine on a plate! Sweet, juicy peaches are the star of the show. Nutty tasting and fiber-rich whole-grain sorghum, nutrient-packed peppery arugula, and healthy fats from the flavorful Marcona almonds, plus a light drizzle of Lemon-Honey Vinaigrette, round out the cast of simple ingredients in this light, yet satisfying, seasonal salad.

If you’ve cooked the whole-grain sorghum ahead of time, this dish can be assembled in under 10 minutes, which means less time in the kitchen and more time relaxing on the beach — or wherever you like to chill in the summer. The recipe serves one, so treat yourself to a light and healthy summer lunch, or double, triple or quadruple the recipe and invite your best buds over to join you. Read more

Lighter Blueberry Pie

by in Cookies & Other Desserts, Healthy Recipes, July 16, 2016

Do you love a pie bursting with fresh berries, but wish you could cut back on all the fat and calories? Here’s how to create a homemade blueberry pie that doesn’t come with a side of diner’s remorse.

Tips for a Skinnier Pie
You can’t deny the healthy qualities of antioxidant-filled blueberries. They are low in calories and contain plenty of fiber. But once these low-cal berries are mixed up with sugar and sandwiched between two layers of flaky crust, the resulting pie can tip the scales at more than 450 calories and 20-plus grams of fat per slice. Add a few hundred more calories with dollops of whipped cream, or serve the pie a la mode, and it’s a real diet-buster.

You also want to consider the quality of the ingredients. Store-bought crusts are convenient, but the ingredients reveal trans fat galore and a list of preservatives. Homemade crusts call for a hefty amount of butter and shortening, often more than two sticks for one pie.

What’s a pie lover to do? Less fat, less sugar and more fruit are the keys to a skinnier pie. You certainly don’t need to skip the butter and sugar altogether (but forget the artificial sweeteners, please). Downsize the crust and make the fruit the star, such as in this recipe for a flavor-erupting Blueberry Crostata. Read more

Nutrition News: Kids and Vegetables, Losing Belly Fat, Probiotics and Weight Loss

by in Food News, July 15, 2016

This is a job for Veggie-Man!

As parents know, it can be tough to get kids to eat their greens. But a new study indicates that the methods marketers employ to sell junk food to kids can be used to compel them to eat fruits and vegetables. For the study, elementary-school kids were divvied into groups that either received no intervention, had banners featuring vegetable superheroes posted near their cafeteria salad bars, were shown (really rather cute) TV cartoons depicting those same veggie superhero characters, or were shown both the TV cartoons and the banners. The TV segments alone barely budged veggie consumption, but the banners increased it by 90.5 percent. And when kids were shown both the banners and the TV ads, their veggie intake shot up by 239.2 percent. “It’s possible to use marketing techniques to do some good things,” study author David R. Just, of Cornell University, told The New York Times. Read more

6 Slimmed-Down Desserts to Enjoy Without Turning on Your Oven

by in Healthy Recipes, July 14, 2016

Here at Food Network, we believe you should break a sweat during your workout, not in the kitchen. Next time you’re in the mood for a sweet reward, treat yourself to one of our lighter-than-usual desserts that mercifully don’t require an oven. From no-bake cookies to lemony icebox bars that set up in the refrigerator, here are a few of our best summertime sweets.

Healthy Banana Split Parfaits
Banana splits are an obvious choice for a summer dessert, because you won’t break a sweat while preparing them. For that reason, they’re ideal in our book. Although these are carefully portioned, Food Network Kitchen’s mini splits pack in all of the essentials: ice cream, bananas, walnuts, chocolate sauce and the crown jewel, a sweet cherry.

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Kung Pao Eggplant

by in Healthy Recipes, Vegan, July 13, 2016

Who doesn’t love a good Chinese takeout meal? The savory, umami flavors and bit of heat have us crawling back each and every time. But what if I told you that you could easily re-create Chinese takeout at home for a fraction of the calories and fat?

That’s right: Today I have a recipe that will be ready in less time than it takes to wait around for takeout. Enter Kung Pao Eggplant. Substituting eggplant for chicken, you add another serving of vegetables to the plate, not to mention additional nutrients like fiber. This version is vegetarian (and vegan!) friendly and can be made gluten-free by using tamari in place of soy sauce and arrowroot flour instead of cornstarch.

This recipe is bursting with flavor — it’s rich and savory with a hint of spice from the ginger and a kick of heat from the dried chiles. It’s so tasty that you can toss out the takeout menu stuck to your fridge for good. Read more

Supplement Savvy: Probiotics

by in Healthy Tips, July 12, 2016

Looking for better digestion in a bottle? Here are some important tips to keep in mind when shopping for probiotic supplements.

What Are Probiotics?
Everyone’s gut is populated with bacteria. Some of these microorganisms have the potential to be harmful, but many of them are beneficial and help protect the digestive tract. The benefits of these “bugs” extend beyond digestion, contributing to healthy skin, blood and immunity as well. Probiotics can be found in supplement form as well as naturally existing in cultured and fermented foods. Common food sources of probiotics include yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, kimchi, miso and other fermented items. Probiotic supplements are most often available in capsule form but can also be found in liquid tinctures. More and more foods are being fortified with probiotics, including chocolate bars, beverages and breakfast cereals.

5 Tips for Buying Probiotics
The supplement industry remains poorly regulated, so it’s up to consumers to choose wisely. Since you can’t rely simply on what’s on the label, here are some tips.

1) Look for additional ingredients.
Many supplements contain more than just probiotics, and consumers should be mindful of other ingredients in case of allergies and to avoid experiencing interactions with medications or taking in toxic doses of nutrients they are already getting enough of. Read more

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