Forget the Fruit Cake! Bake One of These Gluten-Free Quickbreads for the Holidays

by in Gluten-Free, Healthy Recipes, December 10, 2014

Cranberry Loaf Cake
If you’re loathe to try your hand at yet another “great” fruitcake recipe this holiday season, you’re in luck. We’ve created four festive quickbread recipes that are perfect for the holidays. Wrap them up with a ribbon for the road, or keep them out on the counter for all-day snacking. The best part? You won’t be slaving away in the kitchen all day. When it comes to prep time, these quickbread recipes stay true to their name. Just pulse the ingredients in your food processor or stir them straight up in a bowl — no creaming butter necessary. Then, just let your oven do all the heavy lifting and enjoy these gluten-free quick breads that make the most of the season’s feel-good flavors.

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The Chef’s Take: Ford Fry’s Farro Salad

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Dining Out, December 10, 2014


“Local farmers literally come to our door, and they show us what they’re growing and teach us about all these cool new things,” said Ford Fry, the James Beard Foundation Award-nominated chef and restaurateur who heads acclaimed, locally focused Atlanta destinations, including The Optimist, King + Duke , No. 246 and JCT.Kitchen & Bar. Fry is fond of frilly mustard greens and the little flowery shoots that sprout early on from collard-green plants. “We love to use those,” he said.

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Salad of the Month: Kale Salad with Roasted Squash and Shallots and Mustard Tahini Dressing

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, December 9, 2014

Salad of the MonthIf you haven’t made a kale salad at home yet, here’s the perfect recipe to get you started. With roasted squash and the tahini dressing, it’s hearty enough to stand on its own as a light lunch, or a surprising addition to the dinner table. Plus, it’s super healthy, too.

Delicata squash contains the same health-promoting benefits of all winter squash varieties, and it’s high in beta carotene, antioxidants and vitamin C. Combine it with kale — another nutritional powerhouse with ample amounts of iron, calcium and chlorophyll — and you have a delicious fall salad you can feel great about eating. If you want to dress it up for a special occasion or a holiday meal, add some pomegranate seeds, a shower of shaved Parmesan, or a handful of toasted nuts.

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Room Service Makeover: The Healthy Hotel Revolution

by in Dining Out, Food News, Trends, December 8, 2014


Oh, what to do when, at 11:30 p.m., in both a famished and weary state, you return to your hotel and discover that ordering a black bean burger via room service will take 45 minutes? One glance at the won’t-save-you-either minibar reveals nothing more redeemable than a $10 container of Pringles. A vending machine, of course, would instantly sate those late-night cravings. But do you really want your impromptu dinner to be comprised of a decidedly bad-for-you bag of chocolate chip cookies?

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Countdown to New Year’s: No-Resolutions Resolution Week 4

by in Healthy Tips, December 8, 2014

Snacking
For the fourth week of our No-Resolutions Resolution game plan, let’s get serious about snacking, a habit that often gets a bad rap. But it’s actually not so bad; you just have to know the best way to manage the munchies. The key is to chow down on the right stuff.

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Pass the Spaghetti Squash Latkes!

by in Healthy Holidays, Scaling Back on Sodium, December 7, 2014

Spaghetti Squash Latkes
The magician of winter produce, spaghetti squash knows a few culinary tricks. Upon first examination, the oblong shell contains only seeds and hard flesh. But put it into an oven and, ta-da, the tough interior transforms into mounds of soft, stringy ribbons, which can be used for salads, noodle stand-ins and casseroles, and as a soft resting place for fish, poultry or meat. But there is another trick in spaghetti squash’s repertoire, one that is particularly perfect for the holidays: latkes.

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The Secret to a Happy Meal? Convenience

by in Cooking for Kids, December 6, 2014


If I asked you to tell me the reasons why you eat what you eat, I already know some of the reasons you’d give: “tastes good,” “grew up with it,” “it’s healthy” and so on. Betcha anything that “convenience” is at the top of your justification list. I know it’s tops on mine. For example, I eat my oatmeal with a spoonful of almond butter, a handful of berries and coffee with a splash of almond milk many a morning because: it’s convenient (the water boils while I’m making Maizy’s lunch), it’s delish (I like me some whole grains in the morning), it’s familiar (have made it a million times and could do it with my eyes closed) and it doesn’t sit heavily in my stomach but gives me energy for my morning workout. Honestly, if it wasn’t super-easy and available, I wouldn’t even consider the deliciousness, familiarity or energy it provides.

Convenience trumps taste when running out the door. It overrules nutrition (yes, even for us nutrition peeps!) sometimes when faced with a cranky and starving kid. Let’s face it: Our lives — in the year 2014 — don’t revolve around solely around our health, and cramming in all the work we need to do in our busy day requires cutting some corners. Convenience is paramount in our super-demanding and crazy multitasking world. Don’t fight it (you’ll lose). Embrace it.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, December 5, 2014


In this week’s news: You now have another reason to scarf down your yogurt; breakfast’s importance is called into question; and heavy drinking may be especially risky for women.

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Chatting with Marcus Samuelsson, Author of Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook At Home

by in Chefs and Restaurants, Cookbooks, December 3, 2014

Marcus Samuelsson

Celebrity chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson always has a way of getting our attention. At 23, an executive chef at Aquavit, he received a three-star review from The New York Times. At the time, he was the youngest to earn that accolade. But it’s not just that he was a culinary prodigy or an expert at Scandinavian cookery long before we’d ever heard of “new Nordic” cuisine. It’s that he provides us with a new way to look at food, interpreting it through a lens influenced by his being born in Ethiopia, raised in Sweden and trained in the kitchens of Europe. When he’s not introducing us to less familiar cuisines, he’s taking the more familiar ones and feeding them to us better than those before him, just as he does at his restaurant Red Rooster.

In his new cookbook, Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home, Samuelsson steps out of his restaurant and invites us into his Harlem brownstone. It is there in his home kitchen where he blends near and dear cultures and cuisines with the multiethnic neighborhood in which he now lives and works. The 150 colorful and feel-good recipes are ones he hopes create lasting memories for those he shares them with.

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