Good or Bad: Rice Pudding

by in Is It Healthy?, May 16, 2016

This traditional dessert has been making a comeback on social media, but is it a good idea to eat this comfort food regularly? Find out if you want to get involved with the recent renaissance of this dessert.

Good

The sweet, rich and creamy mixture is downright delish. You’ve got to love that it’s made from simple ingredients like rice, milk, sugar and eggs. While this is a dessert, it does offer some nutritional benefits, including almost 10 grams of protein and 15 percent of the daily recommendation for bone-building calcium per cup. Read more

6 Fitness Tips For Long-Term Success

by in Fitness, May 15, 2016

Everyone wants to get in beach body shape for summer, but how about making changes to get fit and stay fit throughout the year? These six tips will help set you up for long-term success.

Avoid overshooting.

Know your limits, and be practical about how much you can and should exercise. It’s better to start conservatively and progress to more strenuous workouts than to start by overdoing it and risk getting burnt out or injured. If you currently exercise one or two days a week, bump it up to three. Eventually work up to five or six, and always include a day to rest. Read more

Order This, Not That: Red Lobster

by in Dining Out, May 14, 2016

This chain has been around for as long as I can remember, and it’s still frequented by loyal customers. Find out what you should be ordering the next time you hit up your local Red Lobster.

Appetizers

Order: Signature Shrimp Cocktail (pictured at top)

Shrimp is a very lean protein, and it is pretty low in calories too. It’s a great way to add protein to your diet without saturating it with fat and calories. The sodium is undoubtedly high in this dish, but if you cut back on the sauce, you can cut out much of the sodium.

Per dish: Calories 130; Fat 0 g (Saturated 0 g); Sodium 1,070 mg; Carbohydrate 11 g; Protein 21 g Read more

Nutrition News: Healthiest Veggie-Cooking Methods, Pregnancy Obesity Risks, Silk For Fresh Fruit

by in Food News, May 13, 2016

Healthier veggie prep

We all know vegetables are healthy, but some ways of preparing them are healthier than others. In general, cooked beats raw, CNN reports, noting, “Studies show the process of cooking actually breaks down tough outer layers and cellular structure of many vegetables, making it easier for your body to absorb their nutrients.” And while the ideal method may differ slightly for different vegetables, the news site reports, as a rule of thumb it’s often best to steam (don’t boil) or microwave your veggies and “keep cooking time, temperature and the amount of liquid to a minimum.” Then throw in a wee bit of olive oil and you’re good to go. Read more

7 of the Quickest — and Healthiest — Side Dishes Ever

by in Healthy Recipes, In Season, May 12, 2016

Here’s the predicament: You’re having guests over for dinner tonight, and while you’re at the grocery store gathering ingredients for your carefully thought-out dessert and entree, you realize you completely forgot to plan a side dish. Don’t panic — we’ve all been there. When you’re short on time, it’s wise to avoid slow-cooking grains and zero in on the produce aisle instead. Spring peas, asparagus, edamame and fresh salad greens are just a few of the season’s lifesaving ingredients, each one quickly and easily transformed from its raw state into a flavorsome, complementary side. Here are seven of our easiest and lightest spring sides that are ready in 20 minutes or less. Tuck these ideas away in your recipe arsenal to consult the next time you’re hosting — no one will know the dish was an afterthought.

Green Salad with Strawberry-Balsamic Vinaigrette
Time: 5 minutes
Rachael Ray’s simple five-minute salad embraces the flavors of spring with fresh greens, strawberries and a sweet-tart vinaigrette.

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Veggie Gardening 101

by in Healthy Tips, May 11, 2016

How Does Your Garden Grow? Tips for Beginning Vegetable Gardeners

You see all the beautiful fresh produce at your weekly farmers market and think, “How hard could it be to grow some of this myself?” The short answer: not that hard, provided you choose low-maintenance veggies and follow a few simple rules. We asked Kevin Karl, farm manager at Growing Gardens, a nonprofit in Boulder dedicated to building community through urban agriculture, to help would-be gardeners start to dig in.

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Good or Bad: Smoothie Bowls

by in Is It Healthy?, May 10, 2016

Are you on trend with the smoothie-bowl phenomenon? Instead of sipping that smoothie, pour it into a bowl and add toppers like nuts, seeds and chunks of fresh fruit. Find out if these new vessels are healthy choices for your breakfast. Read more

Hemp: The New Super Seed

by in Product Reviews, May 9, 2016

Hemp seeds may sounds like a hippie thing, but these days, they are more of a trendy thing. And for good reason: These tiny nutritional powerhouses are a true superfood, packing all nine essential amino acids, plus protein, fiber, Omega-3 fatty acids, B vitamins, and minerals like iron, zinc, magnesium and potassium. “Hemp is one of those foods that can help meat eaters realize the power of plant foods,” says Martica Heaner, Ph.D., adjunct associate professor of nutrition at Hunter College in New York City. “A three-tablespoon serving has the same amount of complete protein as two eggs.”

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Want Better Olive Oil? Start with Better Olives, Says Cobram Estate’s Rob McGavin

by in Ask the Experts, Food News, May 8, 2016

It’s not difficult to find a bottle labeled “extra virgin olive oil” — a term that’s not only ubiquitous, but that is also synonymous in most people’s minds with a high-quality product. Unfortunately, like many other words that end up on food labels, those don’t necessarily mean what they say. In fact, an estimated 70 percent of imported extra virgin olive oil isn’t actually extra virgin at all. It’s been refined and processed or made from poor-quality (possibly even rotten) olives.

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Coconut Chia Banana Pudding Parfait

by in Healthy Recipes, May 7, 2016

Take your childhood favorite banana pudding up a notch with rich and creamy coconut milk, nourishing chia seeds and a probiotic kick! Healthy enough to eat for breakfast and delicious enough to enjoy for dessert, this banana pudding is packed with fiber, is rich in potassium and is super-easy to make ahead of time for a grab-and-go meal or snack on a busy day.

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