The Chef’s Take: Roasted Root Vegetable Breakfast from Zoe Nathan

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 10, 2014

roasted root vegetables with egg
Many people who crowd into chef Zoe Nathan’s Huckleberry Café in Santa Monica come for her phenomenal morning pastries and baked goods, including the likes of chocolate-almond muffins, blueberry scones and lemon-kumquat teacake. But Nathan — who is a veteran of San Francisco’s cult favorite bakery, Tartine – was actually trained as a chef, not a baker, and cooked at restaurants like bld in Los Angeles and Lupa in New York City before convincing her now-husband and business partner Josh Loeb to hire her as a pastry chef at his restaurant Rustic Canyon. “I had never done desserts before,” she recalls. “At Tartine, I had done breakfast breads and lots of savories, so I kind of lied and told him I had pastry chef experience, and then when I got the job, I had to go to my parent’s house to teach myself how to bake!”

Read more

Salad of the Month: Chilled Noodles with Avocado and Cucumber

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, September 9, 2014

salad

Chilled noodle salads make perfect warmer weather meals as they are simultaneously refreshing and satisfying. Here, the earthy flavor of soba noodles, made from a combination of buckwheat and wheat, are enlivened by tangy rice-vinegar-pickled cucumbers and a zippy dressing made with ginger and shiso. Read more

Free of Gluten and Dairy, But Always Full of Flavor

by in Cookbooks, September 8, 2014

deep-dish pizza
When Silvana Nardone’s son Isaiah was ten, he was diagnosed with an allergy to gluten and dairy. His first reaction was, “What am I going to eat?” But lucky for him, his mom was more than up to the challenge. “He told me the one thing he really wanted to be able to eat was cornbread, so I spent the next two months trying — and failing — to mimic the exact taste and texture of gluten-full cornbread,” says Nardone, who is also a contributor to Healthy Eats. Eventually, she nailed it and was inspired to keep finding ways to make Isaiah gluten- and dairy-free versions of all his favorite foods. In her latest cookbook, Silvana’s Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Kitchen, she shares what she has learned. Read more

Looking to Reel Them In? 5 Seafood Dishes with Kid Appeal

by in Kid-Friendly, September 7, 2014

shrimp stir-fry
Earlier this summer, the Food and Drug Administration announced revised recommendations for children, suggesting two to three servings of low-mercury fish a week. But it can take some enticing to get the younger set excited about digging into seafood. Here are five recipes that are sure to lure — and might even entice a few seafood-phobic grown-ups too.

Shrimp: Shrimp Stir Fry (above)
Kids love this high-protein crustacean – and stir-frying shrimp with a colorful mix of vegetables offers a quick way to turn them into an eye-catching dinner. If you’re confused about whether to choose wild or farm-raised shrimp, check out the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch guide for shrimp.

Read more

Taking the Stress Out of Lunchbox Meals

by in Kid-Friendly, September 6, 2014

smoked turkey
It’s the time of year when kids head back to the classroom — and parents head back to the kitchen for another year of lunchbox anxiety. But there’s no need for packable meals to inspire stress. Here are simple lunches worth a spot in any brown bag, plus some time-saving packaged add-ins that parents can actually feel good about. Read more

This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, September 5, 2014

kale
In this week’s news: Some Americans — but not all — are eating better; junk-food cravings may be all in our minds; and back-to-school may mean back-to-better-meals.

Does the One Percent Eat More Kale?
A 12-year study conducted by Harvard School of Public Health has determined that, although there’s still room for improvement, many Americans have bettered their eating habits over the past decade, upping their consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy fats. That’s the good news. The bad? That positive trend was true only among those higher on the socioeconomic ladder and didn’t hold for lower-income individuals, making them vulnerable to health conditions such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes. “Declining diet quality over time may actually widen the gap between the poor and the rich,” study co-author Frank Hu told the Associated Press. Read more

The First Vegetarian Elementary School Is Changing More Than Meals

by in Food for Good, September 4, 2014

tomato
Lunch at many public schools across New York City means chicken nuggets, mozzarella sticks and mystery meat sandwiches. But at P.S. 244, The Active Learning Elementary School, in the Flushing neighborhood of Queens, the menu sounds like this: Roasted Organic Tofu with Sweet Curry Sauce, Braised Black Beans with Plantains and Herbed Rice Pilaf, Chickpea Falafel with Creamy Tofu Dressing, Lettuce and Tomato and Loco Bread, and Mexican Bean Chili. In April, it became the first public school in the nation to become 100-percent vegetarian. But there’s more. To drink, there’s low-fat milk and water. No juice, no soda. And the salad bar looks like something from a very expensive day spa, not the 24-hour corner mart.

For Bob Groff, a co-founder and the principal of P.S. 244, and the man who turned his menu meatless, the need for better food was obvious. Kids were drinking neon sugary drinks, eating cheese puffs, losing focus and gaining weight. His students were not alone. Nationwide, one in three children and adolescents is obese or overweight, and childhood obesity has more than doubled in the past 30 years. “There is a strong correlation between academic achievement and student health and nutrition,” said Groff. “I wanted to prove that better nutrition could make a difference to students’ lives.”

Read more

Time to Embrace a Low-Carb Diet? (Or Not So Fast?)

by in Food News, September 3, 2014

chocolate muffins
A study out earlier this week has been generating lots of buzz with its finding that study participants on a low-carb diet lost more body weight and reduced their risk of heart disease compared to subjects on a low-fat diet. So should we be saying goodbye to all carbs?

The study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, was a randomized trial that followed a group of 150 racially diverse men and women over one year. The subjects were divided into two groups: One group limited the amount of fat, while the second group limited the amount of carbs they ate. Neither group was asked to scale back on total calories or to alter physical activity.

After one year, researchers found that those in the low-carb group lost an average of 8 pounds more compared with those in the low-fat group. In addition, the low-carb group lost significantly more body fat compared with those in the low-fat group.

Wait, There’s More
It’s tempting to want to shout from rooftops, “low carb-diets rule!,” but that may not necessarily the case. The low-carb group was eating higher fat, but mainly from unsaturated sources such as nuts, fish and olive oil. Butter was sometimes eaten, but wasn’t a primary ingredient in their overall diets. Their total fat intake was more than 40 percent of their total calories. Read more

The Chef’s Take: Grains and Egg Bowl from Camille Becerra

by in Chefs and Restaurants, September 3, 2014

grains and egg bowl
Here’s something you may not know about Camille Becerra, chef at the stylish New American seafood restaurant, Navy, in New York City’s SoHo. Becerra studied macrobiotic cooking, prepared meals to heal cancer patients in Philadelphia and lived at a Zen monastery in New Mexico where she cooked vegetarian meals for the monks, sourcing ingredients from the on-premises garden. “Through macrobiotic cooking, I saw the importance of food as a source of health,” she says. “I am always very interested in how food can heal and prevent illness.”

At Navy, Becerra offers a menu that caters to locavore hipsters, with seasonal plates like black bass crudo with rhubarb and pine nuts, tilefish with tomato, avocado and almonds, and soft-shell crab with squash-blossom pancakes. But she’s also partial to her macrobiotic roots. For the lunch menu, Becerra added this bowl of grains and eggs with an eye toward offering guests a midday meal that would energize. “During the day, you don’t want something super-rich that will potentially slow you down,” she says. “For the lunch menu, I focused on lighter dishes with lots of vegetables and superfoods.”

Read more

Smoothie of the Month: Blueberry and Chia Seed

by in Amy's Whole Food Cooking, September 2, 2014

blueberry smoothie

Here is a simple nutritious smoothie for getting back into a post-vacation routine. Although it tastes like summer and is delicious when made with fresh blueberries, the smoothie can be prepared well into the fall with frozen berries of any kind.

Famous for their endurance-supporting qualities, chia seeds also give the smoothie an Omega-3 boost and provide fiber and protein that can help keep sippers satisfied. Since the seeds thicken when soaked, they also add body and a creamy texture to the smoothie once blended. The coconut butter supplies a touch of richness and also a hint of sweet flavor that tastes great with blueberries and vanilla.

Read more