Is FODMAPs the Next Diet Trend?

by in Healthy Recipes, March 10, 2016

If you’re on the fad-diet bandwagon, you may have heard about the low-FODMAP diet. Some folks mistakenly think it’s a new way to lose weight. The low-FODMAP diet is actually used for those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Research has shown that the diet can help alleviate symptoms associated with IBS such as gas, abdominal pain, cramps, bloating, constipation and diarrhea. Here’s a more in-depth look to see if you could benefit from a low-FODMAP diet.

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The Health Benefits of Tart Cherries

by in Healthy Tips, March 9, 2016

I know you’re asking: How is March tart cherry month? Tart cherries are different than the sweet cherries that are in season during the warm summer months. These sweet-sour cherries aren’t eaten fresh; rather they are enjoyed year-round dried, frozen, canned and as concentrated juice. Research has also shown that these delicious cherries contain numerous health benefits.

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8 Foods That Are More Heart-Healthy Than You Think

by in Healthy Tips, March 8, 2016

According to the American Heart Association, heart disease accounts for 1 in 7 deaths in the United States. Encourage your loved ones to eat smart for their heart: Getting in more fruits and veggies is clearly a good choice, but these eight foods should be on your radar as well.

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The Healthier Side of Fast Food

by in Dining Out, March 7, 2016

Healthy fast food might seem like a complete contradiction, especially to a registered dietitian but there are a few places out there striving to do it right. Here are 6 joints aiming to clean up menus and change the trajectory of traditional fast food.

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Good or Bad: Seltzer

by in Is It Healthy?, March 6, 2016

Interested in staying hydrated with options beyond flat water? Effervescent seltzer may seem like a refreshingly healthy choice, but how healthy is it? Find out.

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Kale and Sweet Potato Salad with Honey-Lime Dressing

by in Healthy Recipes, March 5, 2016

When it comes to healthy eating, accessibility is key. Dinner choices are often rooted in convenience, so we need to make the healthy option an easy option. If the thought of putting dinner on the table seems too daunting on my car ride home, you’ll likely find me snagging pad Thai and drunken noodles from my favorite neighborhood Thai joint. Conversely, if I have dinner prepped and ready to go at home, I’m less likely to swing by a drive-thru. As a dietitian, I know that many of my clients have this same mindset. Therefore, my goal is always to simplify the healthy-cooking process.

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News Feed: Sleep-Friendly Dinners and Bedtime Snacks — and How Lack of Sleep Affects Your Appetite

by in Food News, March 4, 2016

Bedtime Snack Do’s and Don’ts

A little nosh before you hit the hay — what can be the harm? The Wall Street Journal suggests that some bedtime snacks may be better than others. For instance, for a solid night’s sleep, it’s best to steer clear of high-energy — high-fat and high-protein — foods, which can give your body a jolt, just when you’d like it to be settling down, and boost inflammation (although eating foods high in Omega-3 fatty acids during the day may reduce this effect). The best bedtime snack choices, Texas A&M Health Science Center neuroscientist David Earnest tells the Journal, are high-magnesium foods, like leafy greens and pumpkin seeds, which can relax your muscles and diminish restless legs syndrome; high-tryptophan foods, like milk, unprocessed turkey and hazelnuts, which can speed the onset of REM sleep; and fruit, especially melatonin-triggering cherries, bananas and pineapples. “Unless you’re exceeding the normal calories in a day consistently,” Earnest told the Journal, “late-night fruit should not be a problem.”

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5 Healthier Ways to Enjoy Peanut Butter for Dessert — Comfort Food Feast

by in Healthy Recipes, March 3, 2016

A creamy swirl of peanut butter can improve almost any dessert: cake, cookies, brownies … you name it. But, as with all good things in life, adding peanut butter means adding calories — 94 per tablespoon, to be exact. Still, peanut butter offers more nutritionally than, say, a sugar cookie, so there’s no reason to shun it altogether. You can give your dessert a nutty protein boost by adding peanut butter and rein in the calories elsewhere with reduced-fat dairy, natural sweeteners and so on.

Here are five examples to show you how it’s done:

Healthy No-Bake Chocolate-Peanut Butter Bars
These creamy bars contain natural peanut butter, tangy Greek yogurt and reduced-fat cream cheese, plus a chocolate-cookie crust. No baking is necessary; the dessert sets in the refrigerator.

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Should You Be Taking a Fiber Supplement?

by in Healthy Tips, March 3, 2016

Although my philosophy has always been “food first,” I know that many folks rely on fiber supplements. Last month I received a package in the mail, and after seeing the cutest Regular Girl logo and reviewing it, I thought it was important to tackle this topic — especially since most women don’t get enough fiber in their diet. Read more

Fake Meat Gets Real

by in Trends, March 2, 2016

Chances are when you hear the phrase “vegan meat,” you think of bland veggie burgers, mealy meatless sausages and the much-maligned Tofurky. But that’s about to change. Enter a new breed of meatless “meat” that’s carefully crafted and technologically engineered to truly replicate the tastes, smells and textures of the real thing — no animals required.

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