What Nutritionists Feed Their Pets

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, February 11, 2017

Since nutritionists are very particular which foods they put into their bodies, I was curious to find out what these healthy food aficionados feed their beloved pets. So I talked to 11 nutrition experts from around the country, and was quite surprised what they feed their four-legged friends.

 

 “I cook for everyone else in the house, and our beloved pooch is no exception. I mix foods like roasted chicken, scrambled eggs, and canned tuna along with her food. I’ve created a bit of a monster, but she’s the best dog in the world.”

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, FoodNetwork.com Healthy Eats contributor and owner of Dana White Nutrition.

Four-legged family member: dog Violet Pickles

 

 “Bulldogs are GASSY, which means paying a ton of money for food is worth it because it helps suppress the gas. We always know when he’s been eating table scraps fed to him by my 3 year old. He doesn’t have to say a word but we know…”

Holley Grainger, MS, RD 

Four-legged family member: Winston the bulldog Read more

5 Reasons Why Beer (Yes, Beer!) is Good For You

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, February 10, 2017

1. Beer is portioned controlled

Unlike mixed drinks and heavy-handed pours of wine, beer comes in a ready to drink container. Knowing that each can or bottle has an average minimum calorie count of 100 per serving can help keep you honest about how much you’re sipping. Savvy beer drinks drinkers also know to keep an eye on the percent alcohol by volume (% APV) the higher it is, the more calories in your brew.

 

2. Beer is filled with antioxidants.

Thanks to staple ingredients like barley and hops, beer boasts a plethora of cell-protecting antioxidants. Since each beer recipe is different, your brew of choice may also be made with various fruits, herbs and spices, all of which can bring more antioxidants to the party.

 

3. Beer can be heart healthy

There’s ample research to support that moderate alcohol consumption (that’s one 12-fluid ounce drink per day for women and two for men) can have a positive impact on heart health. This certainly doesn’t warrant an initiative to drink EVERY day of the week, but it can make you feel a little better about hitting up happy hour or kicking back after a long day with a cold one. Read more

Exercise May Not Only Make You Fitter, But Happier Too

by in Fitness & Wellness, February 9, 2017

Those of us who (try to) exercise regularly often do so with our weight or overall health in mind. Both great reasons, obviously. But there’s another benefit to staying active: It could make you a happier person.

“Exercise on a regular basis can keep your mood elevated,” says Ramona Braganza, a fitness expert and celebrity trainer whose clients have included, among others, Jessica Alba, Halle Berry, Scarlett Johansson, Zac Efron and Ryan Reynolds. “Mood swings don’t occur as much, and overall wellness is achieved when balance takes place in the body.”

Exercise’s mood-boosting benefits were recently underscored by researchers at the University of Cambridge in England, who asked more than 10,000 study participants to track their happiness and physical activity using a specially developed smartphone app. The participants’ self-reported activity data (the researchers asked them what activities they were engaged in the last 15 minutes) was then tracked against information collected directly from built-in activity monitors (accelerometers) on their phones.

At the end of the 17-month-long study, published in the journal PLoS One, the researchers concluded that people who are more physically active are happier than those who are less active. “We found that, regardless of whether we looked at self-reported physical activity or physical activity sensed via the accelerometer on their phones, people who were on average more active were also on average happier,” says study co-author Gillian M. Sandstrom, Ph.D., who contributed to the work as a postdoctoral research assistant at Cambridge and is now a lecturer at the University of Essex. Read more

Cook Up Some Love in The Kitchen This Valentine’s Day

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, February 8, 2017

It’s no secret that food is love. Serve up a little of both this Valentine’s Day with one of these dozen healthy recipes. We’ve got options for whatever time of day you and your loved ones can get in the kitchen.

 

Breakfasts

Valentine’s falls on a Tuesday this year, so plan ahead and get one of these healthy breakfasts prepped the night before.

Whole Wheat Apple Pancakes

Potato and Zucchini Frittata

Banana and Walnut Smoothie

 

Snacks

Congregate around the kitchen table with these finger food favorites. Get the kids in the kitchen to help chop, measure, and make it a team effort.

Tomatillo Guacamole Read more

6 Healthy Breakfast Foods for Under $4

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, Healthy Tips, February 7, 2017

Breakfast is the first opportunity during the day to nourish your body with the vitamins and minerals it needs to keep you healthy. Instead of grabbing for the massive carb-filled muffin at the corner store or skimping on breakfast altogether, opt for these 6 good-for-you breakfast foods instead.

 

Oatmeal Cups

Whip up a healthy whole grain breakfast in a flash by just adding boiling water. If you’re racing to work, don’t forget to pack a spoon.

Average cost: $1.99

 

Greek Yogurt

Instead of going sans breakfast, munch on nonfat Greek yogurt which provides twice the amount of protein compared to traditional yogurt. Protein also helps keep you satisfied so you can concentrate on your morning.

Average cost: $1.50 Read more

Is Sweet Potato Toast the New Avocado Toast?

by in Food News & Trends, Have You Tried, February 5, 2017

Thanks to the social mediasphere, sweet potato toast has emerged as one of the biggest food fads of the last several months. The concept of simply toasting a sliced sweet potato intrigued me, so I had to check out what the frenzy is all about. While I wouldn’t say sweet potato toast resembles toasted bread, it is an easy and delicious way to add more vegetables to your day, especially if you love sweet potatoes like I do. Plus, that vibrant color is sure to bring joy to mealtime. Here is what you need to know about sweet potato toast.

Nutritional benefits of sweet potatoes

Beta-carotene, the nutrient that the body converts into vitamin A, reigns as the nutritional crown jewel of sweet potatoes, providing more than 230% of the daily value in just one small tater. For the sake of this post, I’m using one small, 60-gram sweet potato, which is closest to the weight of a slice of bread that weighs in at 43 grams.

What’s better for you: sweet potato toast or whole-wheat toast?

Sweet potatoes count as a vegetable, and whole-wheat toast provides you with a serving of whole grains. Therefore, we’re not comparing apples to apples. Your body benefits from both whole grains and vegetables, since they provide different ranges of nutrients. Read more

Eat These Foods to Boost Your Brain Power

by in Cookbooks, Diets, Food & Nutrition Experts, February 4, 2017

We’ve all had those days when our brains feel foggy: when we can’t focus and our memory is less-than sharp. And chances are, you’ve resorted to extra caffeine and a sugary snack in an effort to jolt your brain back into full function. But what if you could consume something that’s actually healthy for your brain instead?

That’s the idea behind numerous supplements, foods and drinks that contain nootropics, substances purported to improve cognition. Nootropic cocktails may contain any number of things including B vitamins, L-theanine, niacin, as well as various herbs and amino acids. But despite the growing popularity of these brain boosters, there is little scientific evidence to back up most of their claims. “I love the idea of boosting brain power, but show me any science that a supplement is better than movement, meditation and nutrient-dense brain food when it comes to mental health,” says Drew Ramsey, MD, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry, Columbia University and author of Eat Complete (Harper Collins, 2016).

According to Ramsey, boosting brain power is actually pretty simple. He even made a little rhyme about the key brain foods to make it easy to remember: “Seafood, greens, nuts and beans.” Eating more of those core foods can go a long way toward keeping your brain healthy—and a healthy brain works better. Important nutrients for feeding your brain include omega-3 fats, monounsaturated fats, vitamin B12, zinc, magnesium, iron, choline, lycopene, vitamin E and carotenoids. It’s not about a specific food or magic bullet supplement, but rather categories of healthy foods that provide high levels of these proven brain-boosting nutrients. “Our brains consume 20 percent of everything we eat,” says Ramsey. “This nourishment provides energy and nutrients to create and sustain the quadrillions of connections that construct the brain, plus the electricity that courses between those connections.” In other words: if you want a better brain, feed it better food. Read more

In Season: Blood Oranges

by in In Season, February 3, 2017

Long popular in Italy and Spain, these ruby-hued oranges are now being cultivated in Texas and California. Available from December to April, blood oranges are often both sweeter and less tart than other types of oranges, with a pleasantly bitter edge. Some people say they can even detect a hint of raspberry flavor.

 

Blood Orange Facts:

Harvesting blood oranges in the winter, when they are at the peak of ripeness, ensures that they are highest in anthocyanins, the compound that gives them their vivid blood-red color. Anthocyanins are thought to help stave off heart disease and cancer, as well protect eye health. Blood oranges are also an excellent source of fiber and Vitamin C.

Choose firm oranges that are heavy for their size and store for a week at room temperature, or up to two weeks in the refrigerator. Read more

3 Immunity Boosters to Add to Meals

by in Food & Nutrition Experts, Healthy Tips, February 2, 2017

Cold and flu season is tough, and you may need help to make it through unscathed. Whether you’re hunkered down on the couch with a case of the sniffles, or just trying to avoid any sick days, these easy ways to add immunity boosters to your meals may help keep you healthy.

Turmeric

Long part of Eastern medicine traditions, this spice contains a component called curcumin which can help decrease inflammation. This antioxidant may help soothe inflammation caused by symptoms like sore throat and stuffy nose. Spoonfuls of turmeric may also help shorten the length of a cold by bolstering the immune system.

If you can find fresh turmeric root (similar to ginger root) in a store’s produce department, snatch it up. As with most foods, the whole plant contains the most potent components, but the dry, powdered spice is a powerful alternative. Add turmeric to a wide variety of drinks and dishes: your morning mango smoothie, cinnamon oatmeal with raisins, chicken noodle soup or cooked greens will all benefit from the flavor of this vibrant orange spice. Roasted vegetables or orange vegetables pair perfectly with turmeric. It’s an ingredient in most curries and also adds warm, earthly flavors to eggs and fish.

Sardines

Yes, really. This sustainable fish packs loads of healthy omega-3 fats (1100-1600 mg per serving) into its small size. These EPA and DHA fats may help decrease inflammation during colds. Sardines also contain the nutrient selenium which is essential for immunity. And a single serving of sardines contains over 27% of the daily recommendation for vitamin D, another immunity booster. Read more

Which Airlines Have the Healthiest Food?

by in Food News & Trends, January 31, 2017

When we book airplane tickets, most of us consider things like timing, cost, and whether or not a given flight includes a layover. We probably don’t factor in the healthfulness of the airline’s food. But maybe we should.

Some airlines serve healthier meals than others, and a new study helps travelers figure out which keep calories and cost to a minimum in the meals and snacks they offer, while maximizing nutrition, taste and sustainability.

“Transparency is critical, and consumers are very interested in know about the foods they eat,” Charles Platkin, PhD, JD, MPH, the director of the NYC Food Policy Center at Hunter College, who conducted the study and edits DietDetective.com, tells Healthy Eats. “Often, travelers don’t have the time to plan out and pack their own meals. Their only choice at 30,000 feet is the food on the plane.”

Platkin’s airline food study found that, overall, the average calories per in-flight food item has risen slowly and steadily in years past — from 360 in 2012 to 388 in 2013 to 297 in 2014 and 400 in 2015 — before decreasing 8 percent last year, to 392.  Read more