All Posts In Uncategorized

Puddings, Pops and Pies: 7 Desserts Best Served Cold — Summer Soiree

by in Healthy Recipes, Uncategorized, August 13, 2015

When we’re talking about dessert, gooey treats fresh from the oven tend to steal all the thunder. But in August, no one can dispute the fact that dessert is a dish best served cold. Plus, if you’re entertaining a health-conscious crowd, it’s much easier to put a healthy spin on a chilled dessert (like lemon ice) than a double-decker cake smothered in buttercream. Savor the end of summer with these lighter sweets, from pudding and pops to parfaits and pies.

Banana Cream Pie (pictured at top)
Velvety vanilla pudding and sliced bananas in a light graham cracker crust make for a special dessert with only 215 calories per serving. Spoon the prepared pudding into the crust just before serving, then top the pie with some fresh whipped cream for a decorative touch.

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7 Seasonal Uses for Fresh Tomatoes — Summer Soiree

by in Healthy Recipes, Uncategorized, August 6, 2015

Canned tomatoes and jarred sauces are key to surviving winter. But as long as summer’s here, we should make the most of this ruby-red treat in its purest form by consuming our tomatoes fresh, the same day of purchase (or shortly thereafter). Whether you’re converting sweet cherry tomatoes into chunky gazpacho or juicy heirlooms into a hearty salad, this versatile fruit is the winning ingredient in many a summer dish. When choosing tomatoes, look for smooth, bright, blemish-free skin. And remember: A ripe tomato should be fragrant and yield slightly to pressure. Whether you get them from the grocery store, the farmers market or your own garden, these healthy recipes will inspire you to use summer’s essential fruit in everything from soups to salads, and even homemade jam.

Crustless Caprese Quiche (pictured at top)
Food Network Kitchen offers a mealworthy riff on the classic caprese salad in the form of this creamy quiche. Forgoing the crust will not only cut back on preparation time but also save significant calories. Before baking, adorn the top with thinly sliced plum tomatoes for an eye-catching dish.

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Slim By Design: How to Change Your Environment (and your waistline)

by in Uncategorized, October 6, 2014

Slim By Design
Is your house making your fat? It’s possible that the urge to reach for a cookie instead of an apple or to dig into second and third helpings really isn’t our fault. According to food psychologist Brian Wansink, director of Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab, our environment is the biggest predictor of whether or not we have healthy eating habits. He’s identified what he calls the “five zones” where most of our eating and food choices occur — home, favorite restaurants, workplace, grocery stores and our kids’ schools. In his new book, Slim by Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life (William Morrow), he explains how each affects us and how we can take more control.

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The Skinnytaste Cookbook: Light on Calories, Big on Flavor

by in Cookbooks, Uncategorized, October 2, 2014

Skinnytaste Cookbook Cover

What does skinny taste like? Just ask Gina Homolka. For six years, low-fat foodie Gina Homolka has been satisfying the tastebuds of a loyal following with her Skinnytaste blog. Her recipes reflect her own eating philosophy — delicious, healthy, seasonal dishes that also just so happen to be low in calories and fat. This month she debuts The Skinnytaste Cookbook: Light on Calories, Big on Flavor.
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Food Fight!: Soy Nut Butter vs. Sunflower Seed Butter

by in Uncategorized, September 15, 2014

soy butter and sunflower seed butter
Which of these alterna-nut butters is the superior pick? Just in time for the back-to-school season, two sandwich spreads battle it out.  Read more

The First Vegetarian Elementary School Is Changing More Than Meals

by in Uncategorized, September 4, 2014

tomato
Lunch at many public schools across New York City means chicken nuggets, mozzarella sticks and mystery meat sandwiches. But at P.S. 244, The Active Learning Elementary School, in the Flushing neighborhood of Queens, the menu sounds like this: Roasted Organic Tofu with Sweet Curry Sauce, Braised Black Beans with Plantains and Herbed Rice Pilaf, Chickpea Falafel with Creamy Tofu Dressing, Lettuce and Tomato and Loco Bread, and Mexican Bean Chili. In April, it became the first public school in the nation to become 100-percent vegetarian. But there’s more. To drink, there’s low-fat milk and water. No juice, no soda. And the salad bar looks like something from a very expensive day spa, not the 24-hour corner mart.

For Bob Groff, a co-founder and the principal of P.S. 244, and the man who turned his menu meatless, the need for better food was obvious. Kids were drinking neon sugary drinks, eating cheese puffs, losing focus and gaining weight. His students were not alone. Nationwide, one in three children and adolescents is obese or overweight, and childhood obesity has more than doubled in the past 30 years. “There is a strong correlation between academic achievement and student health and nutrition,” said Groff. “I wanted to prove that better nutrition could make a difference to students’ lives.”

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How High is “High-Fiber”? (Nutrition Buzzwords, Demystified)

by in Uncategorized, August 4, 2014

cereal
Ever wondered what that “high-fiber” cereal is actually providing in the way of fiber? (And is it less impressive than the box labeled “fiber-rich”?) Or ever considered how many calories are in a “low-calorie” sports drink?

In order for a food company to splash words like “high in fiber” across its packaging, the product must adhere to specific guidelines established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA also regulates claims at the other end of the spectrum: Foods that boast being “low in” or “free” of something (such as sodium), must also meet requirements. Here’s a cheat sheet of what’s behind the buzzwords.

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What to Look for on a Yogurt Label

by in Uncategorized, July 24, 2014

yogurt
The yogurt section in the dairy aisle has been expanding rapidly, with more spins on the creamy delight than you can shake a spoon at. The next time you’re adding yogurt to your shopping cart, here are some things to keep in mind as you scan the label.

Added Sugar
All yogurts contain sugar. Yogurt is made from milk, which contains lactose, a natural sugar found in milk. It’s the added sugar — what the yogurt manufacturer brings to the mix — that buyers need to watch out for. Fruit-flavored yogurt and honey-flavored yogurt have more sugar than plain because of added sugars. If you read the ingredient list, you will see words like fructose and evaporated cane sugar, both of which are simply different names for sugar. A good rule of thumb: If a yogurt contains more than 20 grams of sugar per serving, it’s more of a dessert than a healthful snack.

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How Your Co-Workers (and Everyone Else) Influence Your Weight

by in Uncategorized, July 17, 2014

thinfluence cover
Research in recent years has made it clear that losing weight and getting healthy isn’t something that happens in a vacuum. One study that garnered numerous headlines several years back found that a person’s chance of becoming obese increases by 57 percent if a close friend is obese, 40 percent if a sibling is obese, and 37 percent is their spouse is obese. That’s some hefty (pun intended) pressure on your social circles.

But Harvard professors Walter Willett, MD, and Malissa Wood, MD, have taken the research several steps further. Their new book Thinfluence examines how friends, family, colleagues, online communities and the environment exert influence over your health behaviors — and how you can make them work in your favor. Here, Dr. Wood talks about what it takes to stay on track.

Who exerts the biggest influence over your behaviors and why?
For most people, it’s whoever you spend the most time with. And that often ends up being your co-workers. You might spend more time with them than you do your family and eat more meals at work than you do at home.

What are some ways these people can negatively — or positively — influence your own behaviors and choices?
The influences can be very powerful. If you work with a group of people who like to go out and eat unhealthy food every day for lunch or always order in pizza when you’re working late, those decisions will shape your behavior. But, for example, I’m lucky enough to work with several women who all decided to make some efforts to get healthier by eating better and exercising more. I spend all day with these people, so that has had a very positive effect. Read more

Food Fight!: Caffeinated Drinks

by in Uncategorized, July 16, 2014

caffeinated drinks
Looking for that morning or afternoon buzz? Caffeinated creations — including coffee, tea, soda and energy drinks — vary not only in their pick-me-up powers but also in their nutritional benefits. Find out which ones offer the most (and least) perks.

Coffee
Caffeine content: A typical cup of coffee (8 fluid ounces) contains 80 to 100 milligrams.
Perks and minuses: While black coffee contains an almost nonexistent amount of calories (about 5 per cup), too much cream and sugar will quickly change that. On the plus side, coffee is rich in flavonoids and other antioxidants that may benefit brain and heart health.

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