All Posts In Healthy Tips

Ask HE: Should you eat just the egg white?

by in Ask the Experts, September 14, 2011
hard-boiled eggs
Is it really healthy to skip the yolk?

Many health-conscious folks opt for egg whites only. Little do they know they’re wasting a huge dose of protein and other precious nutrients when they toss out those golden yolks.

Q: When looking to take in healthy protein from eggs, should you go for the whole thing or just eat the egg white?

A: When you look at the nutrients it’s hard to dispute. Eggs have a lot of nutrition going on and most of it’s found in the egg yolk.

Marcia Greenblum, MS, RD, senior director of nutrition education for the Egg Nutrition Center brought us up to speed on all the goodies that eggs have to offer. The white of a large egg provides 3.6 grams of protein, but you’ll also find an additional 2.7 grams hanging out in the yolk. The yolk is also home to all the heart-healthy fats and hefty doses of vitamins like riboflavin, D and B12; nutrients like choline and selenium are also in abundance.

Yes, yolks are also where all the not-so-healthy fat and cholesterol are hiding. If you do have high cholesterol, you may have to limit your intake, but with only 1.6 grams of saturated fat per serving, eggs can certainly be worked in to a heart-healthy diet. To cut down on some of the fat and cholesterol, use a combination of whole eggs plus a few extra egg whites in egg dishes like omelets, frittatas and quiche.

Tell Us: Do you keep or toss the yolks?

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition. See Dana’s full bio »

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Healthy Swaps: Bag Lunches

by in Healthy Tips, September 13, 2011
homemade salad dressing
Try a homemade vinaigrette instead of creamy salad dressing for a 25% reduction in fat and calories.

Brown Bag ChallengeWe’re teaming up with fellow food bloggers to host a Brown-Bag Challenge, a month-long initiative to eat consciously and save money by packing a lunch each weekday instead of eating out. Join us here and share what you’re eating on Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #brownbag.

Packing up for our Brown Bag Challenge? Use these swaps to make your lunch healthy and delicious.

Instead of: Regular cold cuts
Choose: Lower sodium varieties
The Payoff: As much as a 50-percent reduction in salt. Check labels or company websites for info on your favorite brand

More tips for the deli counter

Instead of: Creamy salad dressing
Choose: Vinaigrette dressing
The Payoff: A 25-percent reduction in fat and calories

Make your own salad dressing

Instead of: Peanut Butter & Fluff
Choose: PB & B (banana)
The Payoff: A kid-friendly sandwich without corn syrup and added sugar

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Ask the Experts: Top Back-To-School Tips

by in Ask the Experts, September 2, 2011

back-to-school kids lunches
The hustle and bustle of getting the kiddies back to school can make your head spin. We’re not just talking about the youngsters either. People of all ages are getting ready to start their studies – and let’s not forget about mom and her hectic schedule too! We asked nutrition experts from around the country to share their top back-to-school tips to help ease the stress of this busy time of year.

Start Off Right
Our experts agree, breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Healthy Eats contributor Katie Cavuto Boyle says “it’s tough to learn when you’re hungry so remember to eat breakfast; it fuels your mind and body so your school day is productive and enjoyable.” But if you’re like most families, mornings are hectic. Registered dietitian Sherri Hoyt suggests some advance planning. Kids (and parents!) may be tempted to skip breakfast or grab a sugar-laden pastry or fatty breakfast sandwich on the run.  Instead, “take time to make time”. . . in other words, plan for tomorrow’s breakfast the night before.

In need of a few quick breakfast ideas? Check out our Top-5 Quick Breakfast Ideas.

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Top 10 Nutrition Misconceptions

by in Healthy Tips, August 18, 2011

diet and exercise
You may not realize it, but every day you make unconscious decisions about how you eat. Some healthy and some not-so-healthy. We’re revealing the top nutrition misconceptions people have and the truth behind the myths.

#1: You can never eat “junk” food
Some folks religiously stay away from all chocolate bars, chips, candy, cookies, cakes and other foods that are categorized as “junk”. They’ll skip the slice of birthday cake or a trip to the ice cream store with their kids. But food is part of our social nature and should be enjoyed. These types of foods can be part of a healthy eating plan. Knowing how to stay in control of your cravings and eating these foods sensibly is the trick.

#2: You should purchase a food because it claims to be “natural”
The term “natural” is so loosely defined by the government that you’ll find it on everything from cereal boxes to soda to packages of meat. You’re better off ignoring the word on any package and taking the time to read through the ingredients and nutrition information. Don’t be fooled into believing that natural means healthy.

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Vinegar 101

by in Healthy Tips, August 11, 2011

Vinegar made our list of top 10 healthy flavor boosters. With so many varieties available, choosing the right vinegar to compliment your dish can get confusing. These vinegar basics will get your taste buds on track.

Vinegar Fundamentals
The word vinegar originates from the French word vin aigre, which translates into “sour wine.” Vinegars are made by introducing bacteria into a fermented liquid like wine, beer or cider and converting it into acetic acid (that’s the sour flavor you taste in vinegar). As for nutrients, most varieties of vinegar contain about 3 calories and not much else.

Vinegar has been used for thousands of years as a cooking ingredient, condiment and preservative (like for pickles!). The acidity in vinegar makes it a great addition to marinades—the acidity helps break down the protein fiber and softens the meat. Vinegar can also be used to balance out the flavor of dishes and cut down bitterness.

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30 Days of Zucchini

by in Healthy Recipes, Healthy Tips, August 5, 2011
We've got 30 reasons to fall in love with zucchini.

Whether you’re a sweet or savory zucchini-lover, we’ve got your covered. Check out these 30 creative, healthy recipes and fun zucchini facts.

  1. Create a sensational Tuscan Vegetable Soup with zucchini, spinach and tomatoes.
  2. Bake a loaf of lightened-up zucchini bread. Make a double batch and freeze for later.
  3. Slice zucchini into sticks and dip in homemade, creamy hummus.
  4. Cook Ina’s scrumptious Zucchini Pancakes.
  5. Did you know: zucchini is part of the squash family and is technically a fruit.
  6. Need a light and airy snack? Ellie’s Zucchini Parmesan Crisps will do the trick.
  7. Store zucchini in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Read more

What’s In A Hot Dog?

by in Healthy Tips, August 4, 2011
hot dog
Hot diggity -- do you really know what's in your 'dogs?

Hot dogs are a classic barbecue food, but is there such a thing as a healthy frank? Learn the dog-gone facts about this summer favorite and decide for yourself.

How’s It Made?
Hot dogs are also known as frankfurters, wiener dogs, franks and tube steaks. They’re one of the most widely-sold sausage products in the United States. Hot dogs are made from finely ground cured beef or pork (or both), which are pumped into casings that are twisted and formed into links every 6 inches. The franks are then cooked, passed through hot water or steam, and then hung for smoking (sometimes they’re smoked and then cooked). There are various other techniques that have been developed, but you get the picture. Read more

Supplement Savvy: Herbal Supplements

by in Healthy Tips, August 2, 2011
Is it safe to take herbal supplements?

It’s a common (and dangerous) misconception that herbal supplements can be taken without worry. We’re giving you the facts on 5 of the most popular herbs.

Just like vitamins and minerals, herbal supplements are subject to loose regulation and labeling standards. In fact, the purity of these supplements is questionable and many are associated with dangerous side effects.

Popular Herbal Supplements
Taken to boost immunity and help cure the flu and common cold, echinacea is one of the most popular herbal supplements sold in the U.S.. Research on the effectiveness of this herb is mixed. While some studies found no benefit, others did point to its ability to reduce the occurrence or duration of a cold. Taking appropriate doses of echinacea for up to 12 weeks is considered safe, yet adverse reactions including stomach upset, fever and allergic reactions have been reported.

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Katie’s Healthy Bites: Grilled Fruit

by in Healthy Tips, July 29, 2011
pork chops
Grilled fruit's not just for dessert; try it as a topping for grilled meats or fish.

Firing up the grill this summer? Push those hot dogs and burgers aside and make room for sweet and satisfying fruit. Grilled fruit makes for a delicious summer snack, dessert, side dish or even as a topping for meat or fish. Grilling fruits causes the natural sugars to caramelize, which spotlights their sweetness and adds a deep, smoky flavor. Adding fruits to your barbecue repertoire is a great way to incorporate more good-for-you grub into your diet; here are the basics:

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Which is Healthier: Fruit Cobbler vs. Fruit Pie

by in Healthy Tips, July 28, 2011
fruit cobbler and pie
Pie versus cobbler: who wins this food fight?

Summer is all about fruit-filled desserts. When faced with the choice of cobbler or pie, which would you choose? Read the pros and cons of each and YOU vote for the healthier winner.

Fruit Cobbler

Cobblers are a combo of fruit filling topped with a crust made of biscuit dough, traditional pie crust or a pour-on batter. Typically, the topping is made from milk, sugar, and flour. It’s easier to control the ingredients in the crust-topping of a cobbler than it is with pie; if you don’t want your cobbler too sweet, you can choose to cut down on the sugar. You can also use less of the topping, since it doesn’t have to cover the entire top of the cobbler.

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