All Posts In Healthy Tips

Robert Irvine’s Tips for Healthy Eating

by in Healthy Tips, September 4, 2012

Restaurant: Impossible host Robert Irvine calls his diet “clean and super.” And his passion for clean eating is not surprising considering he chatted with us at a recent event in his workout gear. Though he’s often on the road filming a new episode or making appearances, he keeps his eating habits in check with these easy tips:

1. Snack Right: Robert snacks on almonds, oatmeal and egg whites. He also makes a “peanut butter hummus” (if you’re curious, try Alton’s recipe) that’s chock full of protein.

2. Protein-Pack Your Breakfast: Robert eats oatmeal the minute he wakes up, then has a serving of protein: either egg whites or turkey bacon and whole-wheat toast.

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Food Fight: Beer vs. Liquor

by in Healthy Tips, August 30, 2012

beer versus liquor
Labor Day is around the corner—should you grab an ice-cold beer or choose a spirits-filled cocktail? This battle is a tricky one…

Beer
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends no more than 1 drink per day for women and no more than 2 drinks per day for men. For beer, a “drink” is defined as a 12-fluid ounce bottle. Moderate alcohol consumption (as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines) can help reduce your risk of heart disease, reduce the risk of stroke, and lower the risk of gall stones.

The calories in a 12-fluid ounce bottle of regular beer vary from around 150 to 300. Lighter varieties usually run around 100 calories for 12-fluid ounces  and are widely available in bars, restaurants and retail markets.  However many bars offer pints (equivalent to 16-fluid ounces) with around 200 to 400 calories each.

If you’re looking for nutritional goodness, dark beer is the way to go. A 2011 study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture found that dark beers have more iron than both pale and non-alcoholic beer.

See the results of our light beer taste test.

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10 Antioxidant-Rich Foods

by in Healthy Tips, August 21, 2012

raspberries
When visiting your local farmers’ market, you’re not only picking up deliciously seasonal produce, you’re also bringing home a wide array of antioxidants that can help protect your body. Here are 10 foods that should be on your shopping list.

The Power of Antioxidants
Antioxidants can be found as vitamins, minerals or phytochemicals (special plant compounds). They help repair cell damage caused by free radicals, which can mess with your immune system. Some researchers also believe that free-radical damage may be involved in promoting chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer.

If you’re thinking about picking up an “antioxidant-rich” supplement—don’t be fooled. Each fruit and veggie has their own unique combination of various antioxidants—you won’t find any of these specialized combos isolated in a pill. Your best bet is to eat a variety of seasonal produce so you can reap all the benefits.

#1: Tomatoes
Tomatoes are brimming with the antioxidant lycopene which is more potent in cooked tomatoes. To get the most lycopene out of your fresh tomatoes, turn them into gazpacho, tomato sauce or jam.

Antixoidants: Vitamin A, vitamin C, lycopene

Recipe: Tomato-Fennel Salad

#2: Berries
Berries like strawberries, blueberries and raspberries are overflowing with antioxidants called anthocyanins. We’ve got 30 ways to enjoy these gems.

Antioxidants: Vitamin C, anthocyanin, quercetin

Recipe: Red, White and Blue Fruit Cups

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5 Ways to Overcome Emotional Eating

by in Diets & Weight Loss, Healthy Tips, August 6, 2012

doughnut
We eat when we’re happy, upset, stressed, bored — you get the picture. Oftentimes, these emotional indulgences become a more frequent event leading to weight gain. Use these 5 tactics to gain control.

#1: Recognize Hunger
Do you find yourself having an overwhelming desire to munch even when you’re not truly hungry? It could be that you’re bored or stressed—this type of emotional eating is a behavior we teach ourselves over many years— it takes time and effort to really gain control of it.  The next time you get the urge to dig in, ask yourself “What I am really feeling”?

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6 Condiments with Healthy Benefits

by in Healthy Tips, August 2, 2012

mustard
It’s never a bad idea to hold the mayo if you’re trying to cut calories (and cholesterol) but some condiments can actually improve your health. Now, we aren’t suggesting you start downing gallons of these accoutrements, but you might want to make an effort to gravitate towards these six.

Mustard
Used in ancient times to treat ailments of the kidneys, lungs and digestive system, mustard seed (the main ingredient in mustard) is health food to the max. You can find all kinds of mustard at your local market, but it’s actually well worth it to make your own. Sure, you can use it as a sandwich spread but it’s also a great addition to salad dressings, dipping sauces, marinades for pork and poultry and in this recipe for roasted fish.

Ketchup
Cooked tomato products such as tomato sauce and ketchup contain more of the heart protecting antioxidant lycopene. Not a fan of store-bought ketchup? Make your own.

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One Small Change: Eat Better and Eat More at the Same Time

by in Healthy Tips, July 30, 2012

baby carrots
Ever wonder how some people can just eat  all day and never gain weight? While some are just born with a naturally high metabolism (thank your parents), the vast majority of us frequent eaters must choose foods that give us the nutrients and energy we need to function throughout the day for less calories.

Notice it’s not about less food, but less calories. “Nutrient density” represents a food’s nutrient bang for its calorie buck. Understanding nutrient density and learning how to choose nutrient dense foods is the key to eating better . . . and more.

An example: Let’s say you want a snack. Consider one of these three options:

  1. A candy bar
  2. A low-fat yogurt, medium peach and a few almonds
  3. 15 baby carrots, a whole 10 oz. package of cherry tomatoes, a full bunch of celery and a couple tablespoons of hummus or low-fat dressing

You could eat the first option very easily and possibly still be hungry (or crash) an hour later. You’d probably be satisfied with the second.  How about the third option, sound like a bit much? Sound like it’s impossible to eat at one sitting? That’s the point.

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Talking with U.S. Fencing Olympian Tim Morehouse

by in Healthy Tips, July 27, 2012

olympian tim morehouse
The summer Olympics are here! Ever since I was a little kid, I couldn’t wait to watch gymnastics, — diving, track & field and fencing (my mom used to fence in high school). I was thrilled to have the opportunity to speak with U.S. Fencing Olympian Tim Morehouse about what he eats in order to train for such a big competition.

Q: Congratulations on winning a bronze medal at the Moscow World Cup, which qualified you for the London Olympics! What’s your daily training regimen like when you are training for the big event? How far in advance do you start training?

Thank you; we hope to bring home the gold for the USA! Our daily regimen involves 5 to 6 hours a day of training which includes an hour of footwork, an hour-long lesson on technique and strategy, an hour of weight training, an hour of conditioning and several hours of sparring.  For us, the Olympic is a 4-year cycle. Since right after the Beijing Olympics ended, I’ve been training for 2012 London Olympics.

Q: What do you eat before and after you train?

Before training it is important to eat to fuel your muscles and brain. Snacks eaten within an hour of exercise will help maintain blood sugar and keep you from feeling hungry. A pre-exercise snack should be predominantly carbohydrates because it empties quickly from the stomach and becomes readily available for the muscles to use. After training it is important to eat within 45 minutes, carbohydrates with protein to reduce muscle breakdown and replenish glycogen stores. Another top priority after a hard workout is to replace the fluids lost through sweating.

For past few years I’ve been sponsored by BistroMD to eat their entrees while training. BistroMD provides healthy meals for me to eat conveniently while I am training for the Olympics. Since the menu has been custom designed for me by a registered dietitian and arrives fully prepared by a chef, I don’t have to worry about portion control or each ingredients’ nutritional value. It has been a great help to manage my weight while eating delicious food.

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5 Ways to Eat Healthier At Work

by in Healthy Tips, July 16, 2012

eat at work Having a hectic day? Don’t let your healthy eating habits slip through the cracks. Follow these 5 tips to make sure you stay on track while you’re at work.

#1: Eat Breakfast
I can’t stress the importance of a healthy breakfast to help you settle into a hunger-free morning. Even if you’re the type of person who grabs their cup of Joe and runs out the door, make an effort to take in a piece of fresh fruit, yogurt or slice of whole grain bread with a tablespoon natural peanut butter.

#2: Step Away
According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 83 percent of Americans claim to eat meals and snacks at their desks. Instead of mindlessly gobbling down whatever’s in front of you, step away from your desk, computer, electronic devices . . . you get the picture. Have a seat somewhere quiet where you can relax and enjoy each bite.

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Healthy Eating: If We Know What to Do, Why Don’t We Do It?

by in Healthy Tips, June 29, 2012

fitness
How many times do you hear people say, “I need to eat healthier” or, “I would eat better but . . . (insert excuse or justification here, such as schedule, demands, kids, being tired, etc.)? You can have the best intentions in the world, but in the end, the only way to actually get results and make a difference in health, fitness or weight is by taking action.

Taking action can be challenging; it usually means leaving your comfort zone and making a change to your current habits. So before taking action on any new change: a new role at work, going back to school, working out more or eating better, there are three important questions you should ask yourself to know if you are headed down the right path:

1. Why do I want to take action and make these changes? Eating healthier, whether it be eating more fruits and vegetables or eating less fried food or soda, is a commitment you make to yourself. And the changes you make must be sustained in order to get results and have a real impact on your life. But after a long, stressful day of work, what’s going to be the inspiration that makes you choose a yogurt and a piece of fruit instead of a brownie or bag of chips? What’s going to keep you from having that extra drink when you’re out with friends? Whatever answers those questions is your motivation to change. Consider why you want to make these changes, and what you are changing for. Is it to have more self-confidence in the way you look? Is it to serve as a role model for your kids? These are big motivators that keep you focused when times are tough. Figure out your true motivations for change and taking action will become inevitable!

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7 Foods You Should Refrigerate

by in Healthy Tips, June 19, 2012
ketchup
Once you open it, ketchup goes in the fridge.

We straightened out some misconceptions about foods that don’t go in the fridge. Now here are 7 foods that will benefit from the chill of the icebox.

Ketchup
Restaurants go through a bottle in no time, but most home kitchens don’t. Keep ketchup fresh in the refrigerator for up to 3 months.

Butter
All those oils can and will turn rancid at room temperature (ick!). Store all your buttery goodness in the fridge or the freezer. Defrost frozen sticks in the refrigerator overnight.

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