All Posts In Healthy Tips

One Small Change: Getting Green(s) for St. Paddy’s Day

by in Healthy Tips, March 17, 2012
greens
Go green.

St. Patrick’s Day abounds with all things green: Shamrocks, leprechauns and foods of all sorts. With a little addition of green dye, any food can become a part of the Irish celebration: Eggs, cookies, bread or beer. And just as easily, this holiday could turn into a calorie overload.

But amidst the revelry, let’s pause for a moment and consider what foods naturally pay homage to the color of this Irish celebration: Greens! Naturally green foods, like kale, romaine lettuce and Swiss chard offer a bigger nutritional bang for the buck than most other foods. Consider that two cups of spinach (an average serving for a salad) naturally provides:

  • More vitamin A than two large carrots
  • As much vitamin C as seven to eight lemon wedges
  • About 350% of our daily needs of vitamin K, a nutrient vital for blood clotting and wound repair
  • More folate than two cups of whole wheat flour
  • Almost the same amount of iron as a hamburger

Not only that, it’s also a good source of fiber, calcium, vitamin E, many other B-vitamins, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, manganese and zinc. Your body needs all of these nutrients to function properly, and dark leafy greens like spinach allow you to maximize your nutrient intake (i.e. vitamins, minerals, fiber, etc.) while minimizing your calorie intake. So just how many calories are in those two cups of fresh spinach? About 14 calories.

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The Healthiest Social Pages

by in Healthy Tips, March 14, 2012
social pages
Who should you follow?

The food and nutrition information on social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest can make your head swirl. With so much information, it’s also tough to know if you’re getting up-to-date reliable facts.  Here are our top recommendations.

Twitter
Some awesome tweeps to follow include:

Rebecca Subbiah RD
Founder of Chow and Chatter, Rebecca is a food blogger and dietitian in both the U.S. and U.K. Her tweets are full of excellent nutrition articles, tips, and healthy recipes.

Twitter handle: @chowandchatter

Rachel Begun
Registered dietitan and gluten-free guru Rachel Begun shares sound advice about going gluten-free and links out to tasty gluten-free products. She also sprinkles in some general nutrition info, too.

Twitter handle: @RachelBegunRD

Rebecca Scritchfield
Rebecca Scritchfield is a registered dietitian who encourages healthy food and daily movement and fun. She encourages putting #mefirst (so you’ll often see her using the hashtag). Her nutrition info is always informative and engaging.

Twitter handle: @ScritchfieldRD

Jill Weisenberger
A registered dietitian and diabetes expert, Jill provides a plethora of information, links and recipes.

Twitter handle: @nutritionjill

Food Safety News
This is a great resource to follow to keep up with food recalls and the latest food safety information.

Twitter handle: @foodsafetynews

And don’t forget to follow Healthy Eats on Twitter, plus our Healthy Eats writers: Toby Amidor, Dana White, Robin Miller, Katie Cavuto Boyle, Janel Funk and Silvana Nardone.

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Healthy Snacks to Grab on the Fly

by in Healthy Tips, March 12, 2012

lead
With the hustle and bustle of everyday life, there’s often very little time to plan for meals and snacks, let alone cook. So what do you do when your stomach grumbles when you’re on-the-run? If you’re super hungry, maybe you grab those month-old candies at the bottom of your purse or the candy bar sitting around since Halloween. It truly doesn’t have to be this way. With a little advanced planning and some creative HealthyEats ideas, you can grab nutritious and delicious snacks even on your busiest days.

Homemade

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Which is Healthier, Lasagna or Mac & Cheese?

by in Which is Healthier?, March 8, 2012
lasagna versus macaroni and cheese
Which is healthier?

Our next head-to-head battle is between two popular pasta entrées. We’re pitting cheesy layers of lasagna against gooey mac & cheese. Who’ll win this food fight?

Lasagna

Pros:
If your lasagna includes pasta, veggies, cheese and meat, you’ve got yourself a pretty balanced meal. Plus the tomato sauce is a great way to get in the antioxidant lycopene.

This dish is also easy to modify— pile on more veggies or eliminate the cheese to accomodate a dairy allergy. It’s also a very easy dish to cook and freeze in individual portions—a plus for those busy weeknights.

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7 Ways to Boost Your Metabolism

by in Healthy Tips, March 7, 2012
weights
Boost your metabolism the healthy way.

Looking to rev up your metabolism? Say no to dangerous weight loss pills and wacky crash diets. Instead try any of these 7 safe ways instead.

Metabolism Facts
Between genetics, gender, and age we have limited control over how much we can boost our metabolism. Men in general have a higher metabolism than women due to their higher muscle mass. As we age (especially after the big 4-0), our metabolism slows down. There’s not much you can do about the hand you’re dealt, but a few healthy habits can help boost it up.

#1: Resistance Training
A regular weight training regimen can help increases your muscle mass, thereby boosting your metabolism. The key word is “regular”—meaning, hitting the weights once in a while won’t do the trick. Aim for three times per week.

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31 Days of Bananas

by in 30 Days, March 5, 2012
bananas
We've gone bananas for this fruit.

We’ve got a bunch of ways to enjoy this classic fruit.

1.    Bananas have gotten a bad rap; find out why they made our list of foods that are healthier than you think.

2.    Bake up a classic quick bread: Banana Walnut Bread.

3.    We’ve been bananas for bananas for a while now.

4.    Don’t refrigerate bananas or they’ll turn brown FAST.

5.    Dip in chocolate and pop in the freezer for a cool treat.

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TV Chef Danny Boome’s Tips for Living (and Cooking) With Arthritis

by in Healthy Tips, March 3, 2012

danny boomeAs a chef who suffers from arthritis, Danny Boome knows the challenges that arthritis sufferers face in everyday life. Danny, a former professional hockey player, host of Food Network’s Rescue Chef and correspondent on ABC’s The Chew, shared with us some of his tips for living, cooking and eating comfortably with arthritis.

Tips for the Kitchen:
1. To help with arthritis pain and potential flare-ups, a great idea is to look for recipes offering minimal chopping or advanced preparation, so each piece can be spaced out over time.

2. When preparing meals and sides, look to use a food processor or specialty tools whenever possible. A food processor can cut, chop or slice ingredients and can help avoid the arthritis pain usually associated with these tasks.
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8 Surprising Sources of Sugar

by in Grocery Shopping, Healthy Tips, February 29, 2012
sugar
Is there sugar hiding in your groceries?

Move over salt, there’s a new bad guy in town: sugar. We know that sweet treats and heavily processed food tends to be laden with sugar, but you’ll be shocked to find out that these 8 common foods that contain more sugar than you think.

The Guidelines

The American Heart Association recommends that women limit their added sugar to no more than 6 teaspoons (or 100 calories) while men shouldn’t consume more than 9 teaspoons (or 150 calories) each day. Americans blow these recommendations out of the water, consuming an average of 475 calories of added sugar each day! So take a good look at your pantry to see if you’re eating any of these hidden sources of sugar.

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Good Calories, Bad Calories?

by in Healthy Tips, February 27, 2012
milk
Are the calories in milk the same as the calories in soda?

What’s more important, what you eat or how much you eat? Dietitians are often asked this question: Are all calories created equal?

Good?
Yes, calories are calories whether they come from carrots or cookies but that’s not the end of the story. Foods are diverse and offer more than just calories so to truly evaluate the quality of calories, consider their nutrient density.

“Good” calories are nutrient-dense, which means you get the most bang for your calorie buck. For example, compare 100 calories of soda to 100 calories of milk. Calories from soda provide sugar and that’s just about all. That same number of calories from milk provide protein, calcium and vitamins A and D – therefore, the milk is a more nutrient-dense food.

But even the most nutrient-dense foods can get us into trouble. Peanut butter, olive oil and avocados are high in heart-healthy fats but the calories can stack up quickly – here’s where portion control is key.

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One Small Change: What Makes Superfoods So Super?

by in Healthy Tips, February 26, 2012
blueberries
Blueberries are touted as a superfood, but what makes them so super?

Acai, pomegranate and goji, oh my! In honor of the recent Superbowl and an article recently published on learnvest.com entitled, “A Doctor Dishes: Which ‘Superfoods’ Are Worth the Cost?”, I started thinking: where did the term “superfood” come from and what makes them so darn super? Here’s what my research dug up:

According to Oxford dictionaries, a superfood is “a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being.” So superfoods must be healthy for us, right?

There is speculation as to whether the research backing up some of these superfoods has been overstated. In other words, can pomegranates alone really prevent cancer just because they have high antioxidant levels? Since then it seems like every health food marketer is claiming their latest exotic “superfood” will make all the difference in our health and well-being, it’s important to get to the bottom of these claims before spending our hard-earned money.

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