All Posts In Healthy Recipes

Seasonal Ingredient Apothecary

by in Healthy Recipes, October 14, 2012

beet and apple salad
Eating seasonally is a delicious option for many reasons. Not only are you getting produce at the peak of its flavor, you are also getting it at the peak of its nutrition. While it can be sad to see the summer tomatoes, berries and corn disappear from the market, fall brings its own delicious bounty to the table and each seasonal ingredient is packed with nutrients that do your body good. Food is medicine. Food nourishes. That’s why we eat, right?  Fall and winter produce offerings often match the colors of the season and those colors boast a variety of good-for-you nutrients. Here is a breakdown of ingredients the season has to offer and why you should be eating it.

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What’s for Breakfast?: Vietnamese Pho

by in Healthy Recipes, October 13, 2012

pho
We’re all familiar with breakfast staples like cereal, scrambled eggs and toast but how does the rest of the world start their day? In Vietnam a rich and aromatic soup made with rice noodles called pho is often eaten at breakfast.

The soup starts with a long simmered broth of roasted beef or chicken bones typically with spices like ginger, cinnamon and star anise (your kitchen will smell amazing!). It’s ladled over noodles into big bowls and lucky eaters get to stir in their favorite flavors and toppings like lime juice, fish sauce, bean sprouts, chilies, onion, mint and basil.

Hungry? Try pho for breakfast sometime. Here’s a delicious simplified version of pho that can be made in advance. Reheat the broth and keep toppings refrigerated in an airtight container. Try using low-sodium soy sauce in place of the fish sauce.

Remember that pho is perfect for dinner too!

What’s your favorite non-traditional breakfast?

Cooking With Honey

by in Healthy Recipes, October 9, 2012

honey chicken
I keep a squeeze bottle of honey on my counter right next to the olive oil, salt and pepper because I reach for it so often. Explore the countless ways to use this natural sweetener in your kitchen.

So Many Ways to Love
A light drizzle on toast can turn a piece of bread into a spectacular breakfast – honey is that special. The best part about this finger-licking treat is how the different varieties take on the characteristics of the flowers they were cultivated from.

Use mild acacia honey for fruit salad, clover for tea or coffee drinks, orange blossom for cakes and cookies or lavender for sauces and salad dressings.

For everyday use, my favorite honey is from my local farmer– the clean and lightly floral flavor is second to none.

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10 Ways to Use Apple Cider

by in Healthy Recipes, October 6, 2012

mulled cider
We just can’t get enough of this seasonal treat. Scoop some up at the farmers’ market or apple orchard and make these inspired recipes.

Drinks
Mulled, sparkling or spiked. Sip on some cider and dive into fall.

Mulled Cider (above)
Mulled Pom-Apple Cider
Sparkling Cider Mimosa

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Spice of the Month: Cumin

by in Healthy Recipes, October 5, 2012

cumin
Cumin is earthy, smoky and downright toasty. This sensational spice is a must-have for fall cooking.

Cumin Basics
Dating back to the Old Testament, this ancient spice is a relative of parsley (but you’d never know it by the flavor). Tiny slivered brownish-black seeds are super aromatic and explode with even more flavor when ground into a fine powder. Some specialty markets may also have white cumin seeds.

Popular across various cultures, you’ll find cumin as a staple in Asian, Mediterranean, Mexican and Middle Eastern cuisines.

Nutrition Info
One tablespoon of whole cumin seeds has 22 calories and 1 gram of fat along with 1 gram of fiber and 22-percent of your daily iron needs.

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Nuts About Cashews

by in Healthy Recipes, October 4, 2012

cashews
We’ve told you how nuts we are about walnuts, almonds, peanuts, and pistachios but let’s not forget about cashews.

Cashew Basics
These nuts are thought to have originated in northeast Brazil. The kidney-shaped, gray-brown colored cashew nut grows from the bottom of a fleshy stalk that resembles the shape of a pear (though is referred to as the cashew apple). The cashew apple has a bright yellow or red skin and is between 5 to 10 centimeters long. The cashew shell is toxic, that’s why you can only purchase them shelled. Cashews have a distinct sweet, buttery flavor.

Today cashews are primarily produced in India, Brazil, Vietnam and Mozambique. Juice, syrup, preserves, wine and liquor are produced from the cashew apple, though the nut is the main form sold commercially in the U.S.

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New Play on Cottage Cheese

by in Healthy Recipes, October 3, 2012

white bean dip
Everyone’s familiar with the classic diner combo of cottage cheese and pineapple (or peaches).  Whether you’re a fan of cottage cheese on its own (or with fruit) or not, here’s a new way to use this   with this lighter creamy white dip recipe. We pureed reduced-fat cottage cheese with white beans to make a satisfying, low-calorie dip. Enjoy it as a healthy snack or serve it for game day. Enjoy!

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10 Healthy Sweet Potato Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, September 29, 2012

sweet potatoes
Fall in love with sweet potatoes again and again with these 10 deliciously healthy recipes.

Nutritional Goodness
One medium tuber contains 105 calories and 4 grams of fiber. These babies are bursting with antioxidant vitamins A and C, potassium and manganese. They also contain lycopene, another antioxidant that’s been shown to help fight certain types of cancer and heart disease.

Maple-Roasted
Thick pieces of potato wedges drizzled with a touch of maple syrup makes a delightful side dish.

Recipe: Food Network Kitchens’ Maple-Roasted Sweet Potatoes (pictured above)

In Quinoa
Enjoy pieces of roasted sweet potatoes in this protein-packed dish.

Recipe: Sweet Potato Quinoa

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Potatoes + Lemon = Delicious!

by in Healthy Recipes, September 27, 2012

potatoes
We love this combo in the Food Network test kitchen. The extra squeeze of citrus is an easy way to brighten up potato salad, a baked potato or simple roasted potatoes like Roast Fingerlings With Lemon.

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High-Iron Recipes

by in Healthy Recipes, September 26, 2012

tofu cups
Many folks discover they have iron-deficiency—a condition which can result from not eating enough foods that contain iron. If you’re looking to pump up your iron, here are 5 recipes to help you do so.

The Guidelines
Although women tend to need a bit more iron then men, the general recommended dose is 18 milligrams per day. Each of the recipes below contain at least 1.8 milligrams of iron, which is 10% of your daily requirement.

Iron is an important mineral that helps red blood cells carry oxygen through your body. Lack of iron can result in dizziness, fatigue, weakness and pale skin. Eating foods high in vitamin C, such as peppers, potatoes, tomatoes and citrus fruits, can help absorb iron. Conversely, coffee and foods high in calcium decrease absorption of the mineral.

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