All Posts In Healthy Recipes

Can Gluten-Free Be Healthy? The Choice Is Yours

by in Gluten-Free, April 28, 2012
scones
Strawberries-and-Cream Scones

Since my son Isaiah was diagnosed with gluten and dairy intolerances more than five years ago, I’ve learned to adapt my kitchen—especially for baking. After all, it was just six years ago that I was lifting 50 pounds bags of gluten-full unbleached white pastry flour at my old bakery in Brooklyn.

Now, if you look in my pantry, you’ll see dozens of gluten-free flours like rice flour, almond flour, sorghum flour, sweet rice flour, quinoa flour, mesquite flour, chestnut flour, corn flour, oat flour, coconut flour and, possibly my new all-around favorite, millet flour.

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Weekend Cooking: Chicken Pot Pie

by in Healthy Recipes, April 20, 2012
chicken pot pie
Food Network Magazine's Light Chicken Pot Pie

Pot pie is one of those comfort foods that sounds like it would be really unhealthy, but it’s actually not at all. Chicken pot pie is basically a chicken stew that has a crust on top. Some recipes call for heavy cream or cream of chicken soup, but if you use low-fat milk and pack your pie with herbs and savory vegetables, you won’t miss that stuff at all.

Food Network Magazine’s Light Chicken Pot Pie calls for low-fat milk and fat-free Greek yogurt to make a creamy gravy for the chicken-and-vegetable filling. The top crust needs to chill for at least an hour, so start the dish in the morning and bake it before dinner.

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Nuts About Peanuts

by in Healthy Recipes, April 17, 2012
peanuts
We're nuts about this . . . legume!

We’re nuts about peanuts, but they’re actually not a nut! Peanuts are part of the legume family along with lentils and beans. Seems we’re not the only ones going crazy for them. The average American eats more than 6 pounds of peanuts and peanut butter products each year.

Peanut Basics
Peanuts are also called groundnuts, earthnuts and in the South, “goobers.” Like other legumes, peanuts are edible seeds enclosed in pods. They grow underground in tropical and subtropical regions and are thought to have originated in Brazil or Peru. Today China and India are the largest producers of peanuts. In the U.S. the legume is grown in Georgia, Alabama, Texas, North Carolina, Florida, Virginia and Oklahoma.

Three main types of peanuts grown in the U.S. include Spanish, Runners and Virginias. Spanish peanuts have small-sized kernels, while runners have a medium-sized kernel. Virginias are also known as cocktail nuts and have large-sized kernels. Valencia peanuts have three or four small kernels in a shell but are not as commonly grown in the U.S.

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Healthy Microwave Cooking

by in Healthy Recipes, April 16, 2012

microwaveWe’re not talking about zapping frozen entrees; how about real ingredients and healthy meals straight out of the microwave oven!?

Nuke It
You might already rely on the microwave for quick snacks or a cozy mug of hot chocolate, but how about breakfast, lunch and dinner in the microwave? There’s a right and wrong way to use your microwave — use our tips before you get nuking.

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5 Ingredients: Blackened Salmon With Mango Salsa

by in 5-Ingredient Recipes, April 11, 2012
blackened salmon
Blackened Salmon With Mango Salsa

I wish I liked salmon more than I actually do, but I have to admit, I often get bored with it. I know it’s good for me so I’m always looking for new ways to prepare it. Meet my new salmon obsession …. blackened and topped with a super fresh salsa!

Good Catch
Salmon is a smart pick all around. It’s a low-mercury fish bursting with healthy omega-3 fats. It can also be a sustainable pick. According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch, wild Alaskan or tank farmed operations within the U.S are best.

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Kid-Friendly Mac and Cheese, and a Grownup Way to Use the Leftovers

by in Healthy Recipes, Robin's Healthy Take, April 9, 2012
macaroni and cheese Turn kid friendly mac and cheese into adult (and kid) friendly mac and cheese cakes.

People constantly confess to me that their biggest diet pitfall is nibbling on their kid’s leftovers. French fries, macaroni and cheese, burgers, pizza. Things you wouldn’t put on YOUR dinner plate, but eat while doing the dishes. Instead of feeling guilty, why not enjoy kid food with reckless abandon? Even better – get creative with leftovers and make memorable meals for the entire family. Macaroni and cheese is the perfect place to start because kids love it and parents devour all remaining scraps (along with their adult meals). That’s when calories skyrocket. To start, you need a great recipe for macaroni and cheese; one that’s healthy yet rich and bursting with cheese flavor. My renowned macaroni and cheese is below. I bake mine to create a creamy middle and crisp, Parmesan-spiked topping (the part everyone loves). It’s sinful tasting, yet lighter in fat and calories thanks to light sour cream and evaporated skim milk. Since the recipe makes a big batch, you can easily store leftovers and enjoy my mac n cheese cakes with spicy tomato sauce another day – crispy, Parmesan and panko-crusted cakes dipped in warm, smoky tomato sauce. Got creative uses for YOUR leftovers? Let’s hear ‘em!

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Hard-Boiled Eggs 5 Ways

by in 1 Food, 5 Ways, April 8, 2012
lead
Food Network Magazine's Green Bean and Egg Salad With Goat Cheese Dressing

Your kids have talked you into coloring dozens of Easter eggs, but once the egg hunt is over, what should you do with all of those pretty eggs? Think beyond the egg salad sandwich and try one of these 5 recipes.

Food Safety Tip
I’m all for Easter egg hunts, but if you’re going to eat the leftovers just make sure they haven’t sit been sitting out too long. If they’ve been sitting out for more than 2 hours (1 hour if outside in the heat) then trash them.

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Taste Test: Gluten-Free Breads

by in Gluten-Free, Taste Test, April 6, 2012
gluten-free bread
Is your favorite gluten-free bread on our list?

The gluten-free phenomenon has lead to dozens of new products on store shelves. Breads and baked goods are some of the hardest foods to make tasty and sans gluten. We polled our readers and took their favorite brands for a test drive.

The Criteria
For this taste test, we rated breads based on taste, texture, nutrition and cost. Each variety was rated on a 5-point scale (5 being the highest). Gluten-free breads are famously higher in calories so we tried hard to find some smart and tasty options. Most of the brands recommended toasting for best taste –this was definitely the preferable way for just about all of the options.

Food for Life – Millet Bread
Rating: 3.5
Cost: $5.99
Nutrition Info (per slice): 100 calories; 21 grams carbohydrates; 0.5 gram fiber
Our Take: The millet gave this bread a pleasant nutty and sweet flavor. While many GF breads are dry and crumbly, this was almost too chewy. The slices are tiny and overall, not worth the price.

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Why We Love Asparagus

by in Healthy Recipes, In Season, April 5, 2012
lemon-parsley asparagus
Food Network Magazine's Lemon-Parsley Asparagus

It’s officially asparagus season; get yourself a bunch or two and we’ll tell you how to enjoy them!

Asparagus Facts
Part of the Lily family, asparagus is available from late March through June. There are about 300 varieties of asparagus, 20 of which are edible.

The asparagus plant lives between 8 to 10 years. You can tell the age of the plant by the thickness—the older the plant, the thicker the spear. Asparagus plants grow in sandy areas so it’s important to wash them thoroughly before eating them.

The most common varieties of asparagus are green, white or purple in color. The earliest stalks have a gorgeous apple-green color with slightly purple tips. White asparagus is grown underground and isn’t exposed to sunlight. They have thicker and smoother spears.

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Cookies for Breakfast

by in Healthy Recipes, March 25, 2012
breakfast cookies
Go ahead, break the rules -- bake cookies for breakfast.

Cookies for breakfast? We’re not talking about breaking open a pack of Oreos; Ellie’s breakfast cookies are loaded with whole grains, fruit, nuts cereal and even vegetables. They’re hand-held and portable, so great for when you’re on-the-run. If you do have some time to sit and relax though, give them a dunk in your morning coffee or a glass of milk.
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