All Posts In Healthy Recipes

Must-Try Recipe: Shakshuka

by in Healthy Recipes, April 22, 2017

It’s pronounced “shak-shoo-ka” but no matter how you say it, it’s downright scrumptious. Hailing from North African and the Middle East, this spicy tomato-based sauce with poached eggs may also be known as eggs in purgatory. You’ll be shocked how easy it is to prepare this vitamin-rich dish, so get your shakshuka on with these tips and tasty recipes

 

Health perks

Most shakshuka recipes include tomatoes, onions, peppers and. This veggie-heavy one-pot meal is relatively low in calories, but is packed with fiber and inflammation-fighting antioxidants. Canned tomatoes are commonly the star ingredient, which are higher in the antioxidant lycopene than fresh varieties. Eggs add healthy protein to make for a satisfying meal. Experiment with other protein-rich add-ins like beans and small portions of meat to add interest texture and flavor. Some recipes call for hefty doses of salt, so consider swapping in salt-free flavor boosters like spices and fresh herbs.

 

Ways to enjoy

A nutritious and impressive looking batch of shakshuka can be prepared in about 30 minutes using the stove top or a combo of stovetop and oven. For an extra speedy kitchen hack use jarred marinara sauce like number 18 in our “50 Things to Make with Pasta Sauce” guide. Read more

Trend Alert: Riced Vegetables

by in Food News, Healthy Recipes, Trends, April 8, 2017

Remember when “rice” was a just a noun? Nowadays it’s become a verb and an adjective to describe one of the hottest veggie trends around. These tiny chopped pieces of vegetables have found their ways into all kinds of recipes, and can offer a hefty dose of nutrients.

 

Riced revolution

What started out as a new-fangled way to use cauliflower has evolved into so much more. Cauliflower “rice” came on the scene as a popular grain free alternative to rice. Riced cauliflower can be used as a standalone side dish or as the star ingredient in traditional recipes like fried rice and baked casseroles. Using a vegetable-based option in place of grains lowers the calories and carbohydrate counts but this swap isn’t completely a nutrition win. If you compare one cup of cooked rice to the same portion of cooked cauliflower, rice contains more fiber, protein and magnesium but less vitamins K and C.

As with many food trends, the “riced” craze has continued to advance. Instead of just cauliflower, ricing other veggies like sweet potatoes, broccoli and carrots has begun to gain momentum. There is also more variety of flavored rice vegetables. Check ingredient lists as some are seasoned with flavorings that can up the sodium content. Read more

Lily Kunin Makes Clean Eating Simple in Her Debut Cookbook

by in Cookbooks, Healthy Recipes, Vegan, March 4, 2017

For health coach and blogger Lily Kunin, healthy eating is about what makes her body feel its best. This simple philosophy is the basis for her debut cookbook, Good Clean Food, in which Kunin proves that plant-based eating can be personalized to meet an individual’s needs. In it, you’ll find a bowl builder that will help you customize your perfect grain bowl, and a focus on how food can make you feel, as opposed to what meal you’re planning for. We caught up with the founder of Clean Food Dirty City to talk blogging, cooking styles and eating clean in the Big Apple.

 

Food Network: When and why did you adopt a plant-based diet?

Lily Kunin: I suffered from migraines and vertigo starting in high school, and for a period of about 5 years I had pretty severe symptoms. I tried everything from conventional medicine to alternative therapies and nothing really worked until one therapist said the problem could be my diet. And after some trial and error I gave up gluten, and for the first time in a few years, I felt symptom-free. That was when I connected what I was putting my body — food — to how it was making me feel. That said, I’m not completely plant-based. I eat a heavily plant-based diet, but I also incorporate some pasture-raised eggs, wild salmon and grass-fed meats, too.

 

FN: How long have you been Instagramming and blogging?

LK: I started my Instagram, @cleanfooddirtycity, in 2014 as a photo diary for me. I didn’t even tell my friends about it. I would make recipes off the top of my head, take a picture and post it on Instagram so I could look back in a week and see what I made. It snowballed from there when people started asking for recipes and that’s why I started my blog with gluten-free and dairy-free recipes. I’ve recently started adding new natural beauty recipes and clean travel tips. Read more

Cooking in Parchment Paper

by in Healthy Recipes, Healthy Tips, March 3, 2017

Looking for a portion-controlled, mouthwatering meal that takes seconds to clean up? Try cooking in parchment paper, or as the French say it, “en papillote.” Although most French techniques have a bad reputation for being unhealthy (hello butter and salt!), cooking in parchment can be a light and flavorful, quick and simple way to cook. Here’s what you need to know to get started.

Why cook in parchment?

When you cook ingredients like fish, meat, veggies and herbs in a parchment paper packet, you’re steaming the ingredients inside using their own moisture — no added fat required. Plus, there’s no need to dirty pans, so cleanup is as simple as tossing the paper in the trash.

The process

The French term for this cooking method comes from papillon, the French word for butterfly, since the paper resembles delicate butterfly wings when cut into a heart shape. You then layer ingredients on one side of the paper, fold the other side overtop, and crimp the edges to seal. (To get a visual on how to cook in parchment paper, check out this how-to.) Read more

Cook Up Some Love in The Kitchen This Valentine’s Day

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, Valentine's Day, February 8, 2017

It’s no secret that food is love. Serve up a little of both this Valentine’s Day with one of these dozen healthy recipes. We’ve got options for whatever time of day you and your loved ones can get in the kitchen.

 

Breakfasts

Valentine’s falls on a Tuesday this year, so plan ahead and get one of these healthy breakfasts prepped the night before.

Whole Wheat Apple Pancakes

Potato and Zucchini Frittata

Banana and Walnut Smoothie

 

Snacks

Congregate around the kitchen table with these finger food favorites. Get the kids in the kitchen to help chop, measure, and make it a team effort.

Tomatillo Guacamole Read more

Lightened-Up Family Spaghetti and Meatball Night

by in Healthy Recipes, Meal Makeovers, January 3, 2017

A classic crowd-pleasing meal, spaghetti and meatballs is all about family. Get the kids in the kitchen to help stir the sauce and roll the meatballs. Use these tips to make a meal the entire family will look forward to eating.

Meal Prep
Most of the components of spaghetti and meatballs can be made ahead. Be sure to make a big ol’ batch and freeze some for a busy night down the road, and tuck some in the fridge for school lunches the next day. Then all you’ll need is 10 minutes prior to dinner to boil the pasta and reheat the meatballs and sauce.

Pasta
Pasta has a bad reputation for being unhealthy. It’s true that processed wheat products are missing some key nutrients, but the real issue is inflated portions. One cup of cooked pasta contains 200 calories, an appropriate amount for most family members to enjoy as part of a meal. Fill the remainder of the plate with lean protein and vegetables for a well-balanced dinner.

Whole-grain pasta is also looked down upon for being bitter and unappetizing, but whole-wheat pasta options have come a long way. Or try a brand made with rice, beans, quinoa or egg whites for better texture and flavor, plus a higher protein content. Read more

Healthier Holiday Apps

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, December 23, 2016

Appetizers are meant to hold your guests over until the meal, not fill them up before it starts! Instead of high calorie gut-busters, serve some of these better-for-everyone finger foods at your next holiday shindig.

Shrimp

Low calorie and high protein shrimp are always a crowd pleaser, and they pair so well with sweet and juicy pineapple.

Recipe: Shrimp Pineapple Skewers

 

Deviled Eggs

This classic recipe gets a makeover using nonfat Greek yogurt instead of calorie-heavy mayo, plus a kick of spice and vinegar.

Recipe: Lighter Southern Deviled Eggs Read more

Holiday Pear Salad

by in Healthy Recipes, December 20, 2016

Looking for a stunning salad to serve this holiday season? This pear salad with quick candied walnuts and honey miso dressing is a must-try. The concept is easy, but the combination of flavors and textures gives the salad a complex feel. The base is a gorgeous mixture of delicate greens topped with tender and ripe pear, tart dried cranberries, sharp blue cheese crumbles and sweet walnuts. Then, it’s all tossed in a creamy miso dressing that’s packed with slightly sweet, salty flavor. It’s a must-serve for any holiday table.

I make these quick candied walnuts all the time to top salads and soups — or eat as a snack. With a fraction of the sugar in regular candied walnuts, they are just as nutty and sweet. The trick is melting the sugar over the butter-laced walnuts, then allowing them to cool in a single layer. Letting the walnuts sit allows the sugar to caramelize and harden into brittle-like pieces. Read more

Hanukkah Un-fried

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, December 17, 2016

Greasy latkes and jelly-filled doughnuts top the list of traditional foods eaten during the festival of lights. But after you’ve eaten these fried goodies for eight straight days, it starts to take a toll on your waistline. Instead, you can enjoy these traditional Hanukkah foods without all that oil-frying.

Latkes

Also known as potato pancakes, these babies can be baked instead of fried. They can also be pan-fried in a few tablespoons of oil to give them crispiness, and then finished in the oven. Or, shake things up by using sweet potatoes or a combo of shredded parsnips, carrots or zucchini and potatoes. Here are two latke recipes to try, plus a few homemade applesauce recipes for dunking: Read more

Gingerbread, 3 Ways

by in Cookies & Other Desserts, Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, December 16, 2016

What makes gingerbread … gingerbread? Typically, anything baked with the flavors of ginger, cinnamon and molasses. This year, we’re spicing things up with a double-ginger cookie that will help make your holidays complete, plus pancake and hot chocolate recipes that showcase this timeless trio of flavors.

Gingerbread Pancakes
Yield: 20 (3-inch) pancakes

2 cups store-bought or homemade gluten-free pancake mix
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 tablespoons coconut sugar
1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs, at room temperature
1 cup unsweetened almond milk
1/2 cup brewed coffee, plus 1 tablespoon, at room temperature
2 tablespoons canola oil, plus more for greasing
1 tablespoon unsulphured molasses
Maple syrup, for serving
In a large bowl, whisk together the pancake mix, baking soda, sugar, cocoa powder, ginger and cinnamon.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, almond milk, coffee, oil and molasses; add to the pancake mix mixture and stir until just combined.

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. Using a paper towel, lightly grease with oil. Pour the batter about 1/4 cup at a time into the pan and cook until the pancakes are golden and set, about 2 minutes on each side. Serve with maple syrup.

Per serving: Calories 230.6; Fat 7.2 g (Saturated 1.2 g); Cholesterol 67.1 mg; Sodium 548.9 mg; Carbohydrate 34.6 g; Fiber 2.5 g; Sugars 9.0 g; Protein 6.5 g Read more

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