All Posts In Healthy Holidays

Cook Up Some Love in The Kitchen This Valentine’s Day

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, Valentine's Day, February 8, 2017

It’s no secret that food is love. Serve up a little of both this Valentine’s Day with one of these dozen healthy recipes. We’ve got options for whatever time of day you and your loved ones can get in the kitchen.

 

Breakfasts

Valentine’s falls on a Tuesday this year, so plan ahead and get one of these healthy breakfasts prepped the night before.

Whole Wheat Apple Pancakes

Potato and Zucchini Frittata

Banana and Walnut Smoothie

 

Snacks

Congregate around the kitchen table with these finger food favorites. Get the kids in the kitchen to help chop, measure, and make it a team effort.

Tomatillo Guacamole Read more

9 Nutritionists Share Their New Year’s Resolutions

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, Healthy Holidays, January 5, 2017

One of the most popular New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight and eat healthier. So what about nutritionists whose expertise is to eat healthy? I was curious to find out what type of resolutions they make.  I asked 9 registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) across the country to share their 2017 New Year’s resolutions, and it turns out even the food experts can always improve their healthy lifestyle in a variety of ways.

Preparing more meals at home

“While I eat healthy, nutritious meals and work out regularly, I often am so busy I don’t plan  evening meals for my family. Then we end up going out or picking something up to eat at home. I need to do what I advise others: create menus on the weekend, make a grocery list and go shopping so all the ingredients you need are right there ready to go. It doesn’t have to be something long and involved. It can be simple, fresh, nutritious and taste good!”

Neva Cochran, MS, RDN, LD, Dallas-based nutrition communications consultant

Separate screen time and meal time

“My #1 goal in eating is to be mindful and savor my food. In general, I do well, especially since I do not own a television. However, when I eat alone or eat out while traveling, I tend to use my phone or laptop at the table. As such, I plan to make desktop reminders for all my screens, encouraging me to put the screen away and focus on the deliciousness of my food.”

–Dayle Hayes, MS, RD, President, Nutrition for the Future, and Social Media Guru at School Meals That Rock. Read more

The Benefits of a “Dry January”

by in Food and Nutrition Experts, Healthy Holidays, January 4, 2017

After a holiday season filled with overindulging, you might be ready to make some lifestyle changes. Are you willing to kick off 2017 with a hiatus from alcohol? The benefits may prove motivating!

Liquid Calories
Every alcoholic drink you toss back contains calories and these can add up – fast! Each bottle of beer, glass of wine, and shot of hard alcohol brings along a minimum of 100 empty calories. Pour in a few sugary mixers and the calories multiply, making many popular mixed drinks rack up more than 400 calories each. Two servings of alcohol a day for a year adds up to nearly 75,000 calories, and that’s not counting the mixers. That means saying bye-bye to these drinks could save you more than 20 pounds a year.

Drying Out
The concept of an alcohol-free January was sparked by a charity in the U.K. called Alcohol Concern. Part of the intention behind this program is to make social drinkers more mindful about their choices, fundraise for alcohol awareness, and reap the personal benefits. According to the organization, participants in the month-long challenge can lose weight, sleep better and save money.Weight loss aspirations aside, there’s science to back up additional benefits. Studies reveal that even just a month of cutting out alcohol can also spark improvements in liver function and blood sugar control for some people. Read more

Host A Family-Friendly New Year’s Eve

by in Healthy Holidays, Uncategorized, December 26, 2016

Ever try getting a babysitter on New Year’s Eve? I would rather save the dough and spend the special night in with my kiddos. To keep my kid’s happy, I’ll invite friends and family and their youngsters to join in on the celebration. As a host, this means planning a menu that’s kid and adult friendly — plus some entertainment for the kids so the grownups can relax. Check out these family-friendly dishes that will make everyone happy!

Family-Friendly Bites

Shrimp-Pineapple Skewers

Prosciutto-Wrapped Crudité

Healthy Mozzarella Sticks

Crisp Crab Cakes

Mini Meatballs Read more

Healthier Holiday Apps

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, December 23, 2016

Appetizers are meant to hold your guests over until the meal, not fill them up before it starts! Instead of high calorie gut-busters, serve some of these better-for-everyone finger foods at your next holiday shindig.

Shrimp

Low calorie and high protein shrimp are always a crowd pleaser, and they pair so well with sweet and juicy pineapple.

Recipe: Shrimp Pineapple Skewers

 

Deviled Eggs

This classic recipe gets a makeover using nonfat Greek yogurt instead of calorie-heavy mayo, plus a kick of spice and vinegar.

Recipe: Lighter Southern Deviled Eggs Read more

The 7 Worst Calorie Offenders at Your Christmas Table

by in Healthy Holidays, December 21, 2016

The holidays are flowing with food and drink, but Christmas dinner is the ultimate over-the-top meal of the season. Although you should enjoy delicious food at your Christmas feast, you don’t need to feel bloated and have indigestion at the end of the night. Certain dishes, however, rack up the calories more than others. Here are the seven worst calorie offenders at the Christmas table.

  1. Eggnog

One cup of eggnog on average contains 340 calories, 21 grams of sugar and 56 percent of the daily recommended maximum of artery-clogging saturated fat. If you’re a heavy cream fan, know that it adds 50 extra calories per tablespoon. If you like your eggnog spiked, add about 150 calories per 1 1/2 fluid ounces. When all is said and done, you’re talking more like over 500 calories a drink.

Instead try: Food Network Kitchen’s Low-Fat Eggnog

  1. Prime Rib

Ribs just scream calories, with one serving of prime rib (about six to eight ribs) providing over 1,600 calories. Many folks can easily down six ribs, but let’s not forget the additional calories that will be consumed from the rest of the food on the table.

Instead try: Roasted Beef Tenderloin with Roasted Pepper and Black Olive Sauce Read more

Which Sparkling Wines Are Worth Your Holiday Jingle?

by in Healthy Holidays, December 19, 2016

If you think bubbly means big bucks, think again. When adding some sparkle to the holidays, it’s not necessary to spend all your Christmas cash. Sparkling wines can be found in a range of prices, with many festive varieties priced at $20 or less. How they are priced has a lot to do with how they are made. And that leads us to ask: How do they get those bubbles into a bottle?

The short answer: secondary fermentation. Sparkling wines begin much in the same way as white wines, but at the point at which white wine is bottled and sold, sparkling wine undergoes secondary fermentation with the addition of yeast and sugar. For higher-priced sparklers such as Champagne and cava, the subsequent secondary fermentation and aging occur in wine bottles in accordance with the méthode Champenoise. Instead of using bottles, vintners of prosecco and other more value-priced wines use stainless steel tanks to contain the buildup of carbon dioxide during secondary fermentation.

The cool thing is you can actually taste and see the difference in the final bottle of bubbly. Bottle-aged sparklers generally taste more nutty and yeasty and have tinier bubbles. Tank-aged wines are usually fruitier and can have large, bursting bubbles (although careful crafting in tanks can also produce tiny bubbles). All bubbles are a result of the carbon dioxide produced during secondary fermentation.

Value-priced sparklers can be found around the globe. Quality quaffs are available from cold climates like Germany, Austria and New York state, as well as from warm locales such as Australia and New Mexico. Three of our current favorites are: Read more

Holiday Cranberry-Vanilla Panna Cotta

by in Healthy Holidays, December 18, 2016

Panna cotta might sound intimidating, but I like to think of it as an elevated version of Jell-O. To me, it’s a perfect dessert option: quick to assemble, practically foolproof and stunning to serve. This version is a lighter take on the typical whole-milk version. Thick Greek yogurt keeps it luscious and creamy, but with about half the calories and fat of traditional recipes.

If you can make Jell-O, you can make panna cotta. Bloom the gelatin in a bit of cold water, then add to a simmering pot of cream and fresh vanilla bean. The gelatin keeps the filling wonderfully delicate and wobbly. Since vanilla is the primary flavor here, it’s worth seeking out whole beans. Most well-stocked grocery stores will carry them in the spice section, though they can also be found online and in specialty grocery stores. Slice the bean lengthwise, then carefully open to reveal the fragrant seeds inside. Use a small paring knife to remove as many of the seeds as possible, then add both the bean and the seeds to the cream mixture.

This cranberry-vanilla panna cotta is a gorgeous option for any holiday gathering. Made ahead of time, the panna cotta will keep in the fridge for a few days. Read more

Hanukkah Un-fried

by in Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, December 17, 2016

Greasy latkes and jelly-filled doughnuts top the list of traditional foods eaten during the festival of lights. But after you’ve eaten these fried goodies for eight straight days, it starts to take a toll on your waistline. Instead, you can enjoy these traditional Hanukkah foods without all that oil-frying.

Latkes

Also known as potato pancakes, these babies can be baked instead of fried. They can also be pan-fried in a few tablespoons of oil to give them crispiness, and then finished in the oven. Or, shake things up by using sweet potatoes or a combo of shredded parsnips, carrots or zucchini and potatoes. Here are two latke recipes to try, plus a few homemade applesauce recipes for dunking: Read more

Gingerbread, 3 Ways

by in Cookies & Other Desserts, Healthy Holidays, Healthy Recipes, December 16, 2016

What makes gingerbread … gingerbread? Typically, anything baked with the flavors of ginger, cinnamon and molasses. This year, we’re spicing things up with a double-ginger cookie that will help make your holidays complete, plus pancake and hot chocolate recipes that showcase this timeless trio of flavors.

Gingerbread Pancakes
Yield: 20 (3-inch) pancakes

2 cups store-bought or homemade gluten-free pancake mix
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
2 tablespoons coconut sugar
1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs, at room temperature
1 cup unsweetened almond milk
1/2 cup brewed coffee, plus 1 tablespoon, at room temperature
2 tablespoons canola oil, plus more for greasing
1 tablespoon unsulphured molasses
Maple syrup, for serving
In a large bowl, whisk together the pancake mix, baking soda, sugar, cocoa powder, ginger and cinnamon.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, almond milk, coffee, oil and molasses; add to the pancake mix mixture and stir until just combined.

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. Using a paper towel, lightly grease with oil. Pour the batter about 1/4 cup at a time into the pan and cook until the pancakes are golden and set, about 2 minutes on each side. Serve with maple syrup.

Per serving: Calories 230.6; Fat 7.2 g (Saturated 1.2 g); Cholesterol 67.1 mg; Sodium 548.9 mg; Carbohydrate 34.6 g; Fiber 2.5 g; Sugars 9.0 g; Protein 6.5 g Read more

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