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The Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 4, 2013

oatmeal
In this week’s news: More good news about oatmeal, fast-food receipts that make you rethink your order — plus the latest glimpse into Americans’ eating habits.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, November 27, 2013

kale
In this week’s news: The rise of vegan Thanksgiving, food banks that grow kale and the problem with pizza joints and calorie counts.

Pass the Tofu Drumstick
Having a vegan feast is becoming more popular. According to the Department of Agriculture, Americans ate about 12% less meat in 2012 than in 2007. Instead of turkey and trimmings, some Thanksgiving cooks are making tofurkey (tofu shaped like turkey) or cooking portobello mushroom steaks with kale salad, pecan stuffing and mushroom gravy on the side.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, November 20, 2013

apple on newspaper
In this week’s news: The next green juice, texting for weight loss and restless nights for coffee lovers.

Move Over, Kale Juice
The newest juice trend is all about Brussels sprouts. Yes, the love-or-loathe-it vegetable has found its way into juicers. Liquid veggie enthusiasts in the U.K. claim that the cruciferous veggie will follow super-star leafy greens like kale and spinach into green drinks everywhere.

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The New Cholesterol Guidelines: Do They Affect Your Diet?

by in Food News, November 13, 2013

vegetables heart shape
News broke yesterday regarding new guidelines for prescribing statin medications. Doctors are being urged to use a revised set of criteria, established by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, to determine who should be prescribed cholesterol lowering medications.

Eating for Heart Health
The new guidelines also include recommendations for following a “healthy lifestyle” that entails exercising, not smoking and following a heart-healthy diet. In accordance with the American Heart Association paper, the American College of Cardiology recently released a Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk. Here is a summary of the dietary guidelines they lay out to help lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol.

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Trans Fats: What the News Means

by in Food News, November 8, 2013

doughnut
Everyone is talking about the FDA’s call for the complete removal of artificial trans fats from the food supply. What does this mean for the future of your diet?

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5 Chicken Kitchen Safety Tips

by in Food News, Food Safety, October 10, 2013

chicken meat
After nearly 300 people became sick from salmonella in 18 states, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a public health alert. The culprit is raw chicken produced at three Foster Farms facilities in California. Luckily, proper handling of poultry can help prevent illness. To do so, make sure to follow these five food safety rules.

#1: Defrost Properly
Those days of defrosting on your counter top overnight are long gone. One bacterium can multiply to 1 billion over 10 hours—something you don’t want to fool around with. To properly defrost chicken, place it in the refrigerator on a tray the night before. If you have smaller pieces of chicken, you can defrost in the microwave (look for the “defrost” button), as long as you cook them immediately after.

#2: Store Chicken Properly
When placing raw chicken in the refrigerator, make sure it is wrapped and stored on a lower shelf. Only proper cooking can destroy the bacteria, so foods that will not be further cooked (like cheese, veggies or fruit) should be placed above the raw chicken so the chicken juices won’t drip on them.

#3: Skip the Rinsing
Could it be that Julia Child’s habit of rinsing chicken has stuck with us after all these years? A recent study conducted at Drexel University found that 90% of folks still do it! For the first time, in 2005, the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans included food safety, and they advise against rinsing chicken before cooking. The reason is that those chicken juices get all over the place—other dishes, the inside of the sink and the counter tops–creating a bacterial playground.

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Why You Should Give Pale Veggies a Chance

by in Food News, September 19, 2013

white veggies

Health experts keep telling us to eat the rainbow, but according to one recent report, we should be eating more pale produce: Mushrooms, parsnips, onions, cauliflower and potatoes are surprisingly rich in fiber, magnesium and other nutrients. “A potato actually has more potassium than a banana,” says the paper’s author, Purdue University professor Connie Weaver. Another plus: Potatoes provide one of the best nutritional values per penny in the produce aisle—assuming, of course, that you don’t undo all of the good with a deep fryer.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)

Good News on the Gluten-Free Front

by in Food News, Gluten-Free, August 6, 2013

gluten-free cookies
Last week, the FDA issued concrete rules on what foods can qualify as officially gluten-free. Learn more about what this means for folks who need to avoid gluten, plus read up on some important tips.

Defining Gluten-Free
More than 3 million Americans suffer from celiac disease, an autoimmune condition that makes them unable to digest gluten. The only way to treat the disease is to exclude gluten from the diet or else risk damage to the digestive system as well as nutrient deficiencies and other serious medical problems.

The new FDA rule mandates that products labeled “gluten-free” must contain no more than 20 parts per million of gluten. While many companies have already set this limit for themselves, the FDA rule, which food manufacturers must comply with by this time next year, will help ensure that companies using the term are adhering to the standard.

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Aronia: The New Superfood?

by in Food News, July 16, 2013

aronia berries
A buzz is brewing over this tiny berry. Have you heard about Aronia yet?

What is Aronia?
Unlike the majority of popular super fruits (think acai and pomegranate), this berry is native to North America. States like Iowa and Ohio have been growing quite a bit of it in recent years. Aronia melanocarpa (its proper botanical name) is also grown around the globe in countries like Denmark and Russia. Sometimes referred to as “chokeberry,” these deep black-ish purple berries look similar to blueberries but have a much more sharp and sour flavor.

Aronia Products
Aronia juice seems to be the most popular form out there; it’s often blended with sweeter flavors like apple and grape juices. Juice isn’t the only way to get some of this berry. Capsules, teas, syrups and even food colorings are some of the newer products beginning to hit the market. But why the hype?

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Food News: National Parks to Offer Healthier Grub

by in Food News, June 20, 2013

park

Worried about finding healthy eats while your family visits national parks this summer? Fret not, the First Lady’s healthy diet initiative has got your back.

The National Park Service, as part of Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign, recently announced its new nationwide “Healthy Parks, Healthy People” plan: a list of food guidelines and standards for healthy options at more than 250 locations across national parks.

“Traditional favorites such as hot dogs and ice cream will remain, but the new standards will provide additional choices, such as fish tacos and yogurt parfaits, for the 23 million people who buy meals in national parks each year,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis in a press release.

Options include items like lentil soup, bison hot dogs and fresh produce from local farms. Grand Canyon South Rim and Yellowstone National park are among a handful of sites already offering healthier fair.

To find out more, view the standards here.

Tell us: What do you think of the healthy park initiative?