All Posts In Food News

News Feed: Sugar in Juice; Chocolate and Exercise; Benefits of Japanese Diet Guidelines

by in Food News, April 1, 2016

The truth about juice

Sure, “100% fruit juice” sounds healthy, but guess what? Just one serving of many kid-targeted fruit juices, juice drinks or smoothies contains a full day’s worth of sugar, or more, according to new research published in BMJ Open. “Most people assume, wrongly, that fruit juice is healthy and contains little free sugar,” study author Dr. Simon Capewell, of the University of Liverpool, told Time, referring to added sugars, including glucose, fructose, sucrose and table sugar as well as honey and syrup. However, many of the products Capewell and his colleagues tested “contained up to six teaspoons of sugar in a standard 200 ml serving, twice the daily recommended limit for a young child,” he said. Smoothies were often even worse, containing as much as eight teaspoons of sugar — three times the U.K.’s recommended daily amount — in the standard serving. Whoa.

Read more

News Feed: Big Breakfast News, Vegan Nutrition, Dieting Done Differently

by in Food News, March 25, 2016

Starting the Day Right

It’s a big week for breakfast news: A new study, published in the journal Pediatric Obesity, found that middle-school students who ate no breakfast or ate it only occasionally had double the risk of obesity as those who ate breakfast regularly. But students who ate “double-breakfast” — first at home and then at school — did not seem to be at any greater risk for obesity as those who ate only one breakfast, either at home or school. “It seems it’s a bigger problem to have kids skipping breakfast than to have these kids eating two breakfasts,” concluded study co-author Marlene Schwartz, of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. Meanwhile, the Deseret News weighed whether cereal, the sales of which have declined in recent years, is a breakfast food worth rescuing, and Time offered an eye-opening look at 10 healthy breakfast options enjoyed in countries around the world.

Read more

Nutrition News Feed: Label Transparency, Ultra-Processed Foods, The Hearty-Breakfast Myth

by in Food News, March 18, 2016

Who farmed your food?

Curious about what’s in the packaged foods you eat, where the ingredients came from, and who produced them and how? More and more consumers are demanding this sort of information and transparency, and so companies big (Kellogg’s, Hershey, Wal-Mart and Campbell’s Soup, among others) and “niche” (Fish + People, The Real Co.) are responding through a variety of labeling initiatives. “Driving the efforts are consumers’ heightened concerns about health and the environmental and social impact of food production, as well as regulatory and safety worries,” the Wall Street Journal reports. Soon we’ll probably know a lot more about the people who produce our food — a development that is as sweet as it is empowering.

Read more

News Feed: Raw Milk’s Revenge, Ugly Produce and Fasting

by in Food News, March 11, 2016

Raw milk or raw luck?

Oh, the irony! Just weeks after passing legislation making it legal to drink raw milk in West Virginia — despite warnings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration that unpasteurized milk may “pose a serious health risk” — members of the state’s House of Delegates celebrated by drinking raw milk. Guess what happened? A bunch of the lawmakers fell ill. Some of the delegates, including some of those who drank the milk and the guy who distributed it to his colleagues, insist that one had nothing to do with the other, blaming the illnesses on a stomach bug that was going around. “There’s nobody up there that got sick off that milk,” Delegate Scott Cadle, who sponsored the legislation and shared the milk, told the Charleston Gazette-Mail. “It’s just bad timing, I guess.” The West Virginia Bureau of Public Health is investigating.

Read more

News Feed: Sleep-Friendly Dinners and Bedtime Snacks — and How Lack of Sleep Affects Your Appetite

by in Food News, March 4, 2016

Bedtime Snack Do’s and Don’ts

A little nosh before you hit the hay — what can be the harm? The Wall Street Journal suggests that some bedtime snacks may be better than others. For instance, for a solid night’s sleep, it’s best to steer clear of high-energy — high-fat and high-protein — foods, which can give your body a jolt, just when you’d like it to be settling down, and boost inflammation (although eating foods high in Omega-3 fatty acids during the day may reduce this effect). The best bedtime snack choices, Texas A&M Health Science Center neuroscientist David Earnest tells the Journal, are high-magnesium foods, like leafy greens and pumpkin seeds, which can relax your muscles and diminish restless legs syndrome; high-tryptophan foods, like milk, unprocessed turkey and hazelnuts, which can speed the onset of REM sleep; and fruit, especially melatonin-triggering cherries, bananas and pineapples. “Unless you’re exceeding the normal calories in a day consistently,” Earnest told the Journal, “late-night fruit should not be a problem.”

Read more

Fake Meat Gets Real

by in Trends, March 2, 2016

Chances are when you hear the phrase “vegan meat,” you think of bland veggie burgers, mealy meatless sausages and the much-maligned Tofurky. But that’s about to change. Enter a new breed of meatless “meat” that’s carefully crafted and technologically engineered to truly replicate the tastes, smells and textures of the real thing — no animals required.

Read more

So What, Exactly, Is “Natural”?

by in Food News, February 29, 2016

According to the dictionary, the word “natural” means “having undergone little or no processing and containing no chemical additives.” But when it comes to seeing the word “natural” on a food label, the definition gets much murkier — so much so, in fact, that the FDA (which is currently reviewing the term and how it can define and regulate it) has recently extended its public comment period on the meaning of this word until May 10, 2016.

Read more

News Feed: Wood Pulp in Cheese, Starbucks Sugar Shocker, Cage-Free Trader Joe’s

by in Food News, February 26, 2016

Cheese, please

Have we all been sprinkling wood on our pasta and pizza? Some suppliers of grated Parmesan cheese have been filling their products with cellulose — an anti-clumping additive made from wood pulp — or using other, less expensive cheeses and failing to disclose the actual ingredients on the label, Bloomberg Business reports. One cheese maker has estimated that 20 percent of hard Italian cheeses are mislabeled. Another told Bloomberg that only one-third of the 28 brands of grated Parmesan it tested appeared to be accurately labeled, in terms of protein levels and fillers. In response to a Bloomberg investigation, in which a lab test confirmed that several store brands contained high levels of cellulose, several stores have begun pulling the questionable products from their shelves.

Read more

News Feed: Fish and Brains, Sugar in Fruit, Pomegranate Healthfulness

by in Food News, February 19, 2016

Fish for brain health

You’ve heard fish is good brain food, but also worry about the effects of mercury in fish on your brain. What to do? New research tips the scales in fish’s favor. A recent study by Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago, indicates that eating a serving of seafood per week may protect the brains of older adults from the effects of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease — especially among those at a higher genetic risk for developing Alzheimer’s. The study also concluded that, although those who ate seafood had higher levels of mercury in their brains, that mercury did not correlate to brain damage. “The evidence is quite clear that people who consume healthier forms of fish … are going to end up with healthier brains,” James T. Becker, an Alzheimer’s expert who was not involved in the study, told CNN.

Read more

Is Fiber the Next Protein?

by in Food News, February 17, 2016

Every nutrient, it seems, gets to have its day in the sun (and its time in the doghouse). First fat was the enemy, then good fats suddenly became all the rage. High-protein diets have come and gone. And while carbs have been demonized by some, the high-fiber content of complex carbohydrates is predicted to be the next big thing on the dietary horizon. Read more