All Posts In Food News

It’s Been a Bad Week for Hot Dog Lovers

by in Food News, October 26, 2015

First, a recent “genomic” analysis by the online food guide Clear Food determined that 14 percent of the 345 different hot dogs and sausages sold under 75 brands it examined contained either ingredients not listed on the label or had “hygienic” issues, in which a “non-harmful contaminant is introduced to the hot dog.” What’s more, 2 percent of the samples were found to contain human DNA. (Ew.)

Vegetarians get no bragging rights, though: Two-thirds of the vegetarian frankfurters tested contained human DNA, and 10 percent of all vegetarian products tested were found to contain meat — be it chicken in a vegetarian breakfast sausage or pork in a veggie hot dog.

Still, some major brands fared better than others: Butterball, McCormick, Eckrich and Hebrew National received especially high marks, as did some regional and specialty brands.

Now, on the heels of that alarming news, comes reason for frankfurter fans to feel even more fearful: Read more

Nutrition News: Fats and Carbs, Quinoa’s Many Benefits, Oprah and Weight Watchers

by in Food News, October 23, 2015

 

Quinoa: quite the healthy food

There’s been so much “superfood” hype around quinoa — is all the excitement justified? Time magazine asked five nutrition experts, and they overwhelmingly agreed that it was. The seed is high in fiber, iron and protein, provides essential amino acids, and is gluten-free. Generally eaten as a whole food, quinoa prevents the loss of nutrients. Plus, recent research suggests the proteins in quinoa may decrease cholesterol levels and lower oxidative-stress levels. Quin- … whoa. Read more

Nutrition News: Red Wine and Diabetes, 2016 Food Trends, Canned Fish or Fresh?

by in Food News, October 16, 2015

Red wine for diabetes?

A glass of red wine with dinner? For people with Type 2 diabetes, the answer may be yes. A new study conducted by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in Israel, found that drinking a glass of red wine with dinner may be not only safe but perhaps even beneficial for those with diabetes. The study assigned 224 patients with Type 2 diabetes, none of whom were alcohol drinkers previously and all of whom followed a Mediterranean diet without calorie restrictions, to drink 5 ounces of either mineral water, white wine or red wine with their dinner — and followed them for two years. Those who drank red wine saw their HDL (“good”) cholesterol climb by 10 percent over those who drank only mineral water with dinner. White-wine drinkers did not see the same effect. The researchers say a broader follow-up study is necessary to confirm the initial results.

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Nutrition News: White Pasta Alternatives, Dietary Guidelines and Sustainability and Social Media’s Nutritional Impact

by in Food News, October 9, 2015

Beyond White Pasta

White pasta can spike blood sugar and lead to an increased risk of weight gain, Type 2 diabetes and other health issues. So look no further if you’re searching for a few healthy alternatives to white pasta, because U.S. News Health & Wellness reporter K. Aleisha Fetters has some suggestions: Why not try whole-wheat pasta, quinoa pasta, buckwheat noodles, sprouted-grain pasta, spelt pasta or brown-rice pasta instead? “Luckily, the more heat white pasta receives from critics, the more food manufacturers work to up their alternative-pasta game with whole grains, heart-healthy fiber, filling protein, and more vitamins and minerals than you’ll find in a salad,” she wrote. That is lucky!

Sustainability Beyond the Scope?

Should the new version of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans factor in sustainability, considering not only Americans’ health and well-being but also that of our planet? A group of public health and sustainability experts argued last week in the journal Science that they should — echoing the recommendation made by a federal advisory committee of nutritionists in April. But lawmakers and administration officials apparently disagree. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell announced Tuesday that the updated dietary guidelines to be released in December will not consider environmental sustainability — which would have endorsed a diet with fewer animal-based foods. Some congressmen, who had argued that sustainability was outside the guidelines’ scope, cheered the decision on Wednesday.

Instagram for Breakfast

Parents may feel as if social media is consuming their teens’ lives, but it may also be affecting what those teens consume. A cross-sectional study of about 9,000 middle- and high-school students conducted by Canadian researchers and published in the British Journal of Nutrition concluded that the more time teens spent on social media sites — like Instagram, Vine, Snapchat, WhatsApp, Facebook and Twitter — the more likely they were to make poor nutritional choices, like not eating breakfast or drinking sugary beverages and energy drinks. Teens who used social networking sites for less than one hour a day had a 67 percent higher chance of drinking sugary beverages, while those who used them for just under two or five hours had a 90 percent and a 3.3-fold increase, respectively, in the odds of doing so, according to the researchers. Gulp.

Nutrition News: The Full-Fat Trend, Healthy Office Snacks, Coke Spending

by in Food News, October 2, 2015

Is full-fat on trend?

For years, we’ve all been urged to curtail our consumption of saturated fat, advice that affected our appetite for butter, meat and whole milk — or at least the amount of those foods we ate. But, a new report published by the Credit Suisse Research Institute has determined, Americans are rebelling against the old guidance, which has grown murkier, and eating more full-fat foods. Butter sales rose 14 percent in 2014 and an additional 6 percent in the first three months of 2015, while sales of whole milk climbed 11 percent and skim milk purchases plummeted 14 percent in the first six months of 2015. The authors suggest the trend may be part of larger shift toward natural – organic, unprocessed – foods. “Full-fat milk sounds a lot more natural to people than 2 percent or skim milk,” lead author Stefano Natella told The New York Times. “Cows don’t produce skim milk. You have to process it to take out the fat.” Read more

Nutrition News: Fast-Food Kids, Vegetable Supply, Plate Size Matters

by in Food News, September 25, 2015

Frightening fast-food facts
If you think America has been easing off its love affair with fast food, a new CDC report offers bracing news: On any given day, according to the study, more than one-third (34.3 percent) of all U.S. kids and teens (ages 2 to 19) scarf down some kind of fast food — a number that has remained relatively stable over the past 15 years, despite our cultural push for more healthful eating. And while almost 12 percent of kids and teens got fewer than 25 percent of their daily calories from fast food, nearly 11 percent of them got between 25 and 40 percent of those calories from it — and 12 percent of them gobbled up more than 40 percent of their daily calories from places that traffic largely (though of course not exclusively) in burgers, fries, sodas and the like. Gulp. Read more

Nutrition News: Exotic New Superfoods, Food Safety Measures, NYC Salt Rules

by in Food News, September 18, 2015

The search for the next big superfood

Now that chain-store consumers are devouring acai, quinoa and chia seeds en masse, seekers of edgy new superfoods are scouring the world for the next big thing, something packed with antioxidants, vitamins and minerals … and coated with the allure of the exotic. Warning that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is probably sufficient for health and energy and that unusual foods can be unpredictable and even possibly harmful (for one thing, they may interact unfavorably with medicines), the Los Angeles Times lists a few superfoods gaining favor: Will moringa, E3 live blue-green algae, citicoline, freekeh, turkey tail mushroom or Sideritis be the next kale — or just a big fail? Time and tastes will tell.

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These Celebrities Have Some Seriously Healthy Food Riders

by in Food News, September 18, 2015

Many well-known celebs spend long stretches of time on the road, which can leave them searching for some of the comforts of home. Find out what healthy foods your favorite stars have asked for while traveling the world. Read more

Nutrition News: Nutritionists’ Breakfasts, Vitamin C Benefits, McDonald’s Cage-Free Eggs  

by in Food News, September 11, 2015

Nutritionist breakfast recommendations

What do nutrition experts eat for breakfast? Because September is “breakfast month” — who knew? — Business Insider asked 38 of them what they liked to eat for the meal that is widely regarded as the day’s most important, and why. Their picks include a lot of old standbys, such as eggs, oatmeal, Greek yogurt, whole grains, nuts and fruit, but they also include some eye-opening items, like sweet potatoes, organic tofu and pumpkin seeds. Feast your eyes on their suggestions — and then just feast. Read more

Nutrition News: Rethink Kids and Peanuts, a New Sugar Substitute, Organics Under Fire

by in Food News, September 4, 2015

New peanuts practice

You know how parents have been urged to delay giving their kids peanuts, lest they have an allergy? Well, scratch that. New research from the National Institutes of Health indicates that putting off the introduction of peanuts into kids’ diets may increase their chances of developing peanut allergies — and the American Academy of Pediatrics has now issued a statement saying it joins other organizations in encouraging health care providers to recommend that children be given products containing peanuts when they are between 4 and 11 months old, especially if those children have severe eczema or are allergic to eggs. The AAP says this earlier introduction, may reduce peanut allergy rates by as much as 81 percent, Time reports, but the organization cautions that, to prevent choking, infants should be given creamy peanut butter and not graduate to whole peanuts until around age 4. Read more