All Posts In Food News

Kale Juice as the Next Cocktail Mixer? (Yes, It’s Happening.)

by in Trends, January 20, 2014

green margarita
In signs that enthusiasm for juicing shows no signs of flagging, it now extends to those who like to indulge in the occasional cocktail. As the New York Times reported last month, hip bars are embracing the world of fresh fruit and vegetable juices — taking the same concoctions people use to re-energize after a workout or up their intake of leafy greens — and adding a shot of vodka, gin or tequila. Besides being pro-produce, health-minded booze buffs, it seems, are also drawn to the idea of mixers that preclude the usual sugary sodas and syrups.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, January 15, 2014

greek yogurt
In this week’s nutrition news: Students and politicians embrace Greek yogurt; avocado enthusiasts have more reasons to rejoice; and caffeine generates buzz in a study on memory.

Greek Yogurt to Hit Cafeteria Trays?
A 3-month federal program conducted in four states attempted to gauge students’ interest in Greek yogurt as a protein source in school lunches. During the pilot program, students scarfed down approximately 200,000 pounds of the thick yogurt, prompting politicians to push for an expansion of the test. (The program’s proponents include Senator Charles E. Schumer of New York — home of Greek yogurt giant Chobani.)

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Is This Syrup the Next Trendy Sweetener?

by in Food News, January 11, 2014

yacon syrup
Yacon syrup has been dubbed a “game-changer” for slow metabolism — and social media is exploding with promises of weight loss. But is the syrup worth the hype?

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, January 8, 2014

utensils
In this week’s news: A high-tech fork tells eaters to proceed with caution; a cereal giant goes GMO-free; and a panel announces the best overall diet for 2014.

The Next Take on Slow Food?
A recent study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics examined the relationship between eating speed (fast or slow) and meal satisfaction. The result: Subjects who ate food at a slower rate were more satisfied than those who were asked to eat quickly. Eating at a slower pace can also translate into eating fewer calories.

In related news: A reporter for the Wall Street Journal recently tested an electric fork that helps moderate eating speed. When the eater scarfs down food too quickly — taking multiple bites in 10 seconds — the fork vibrates.

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7 Health Food Trends for 2014

by in Food News, January 3, 2014

cauliflower
What new health food trends are on the horizon? Which ingredients will be in health food stores everywhere? And what will restaurant menus be peddling? Here’s the scoop for 2014.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, January 1, 2014

kale close-up
In this week’s news: Vending machines may soon have to dispense more than just candy bars; nutrition professionals say count kale in (again) for 2014; and a dietitian explains the secret to making realistic New Year’s resolutions.

2014: Kale Still Ready For Its Close-Up
According to a survey of 500 dietitians on diet and nutrition trends for 2014, kale, coconut oil and chia seeds will remain on the scene; ancient grains are the next new thing; “low-fat” diets will lose some of their heft; and nutrition blogs will continue to boom (starting right here, of course).

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 25, 2013

whisk
In this week’s news: Scientists say that fiber is (still) good for heart health; nutrition experts explain why you might want to give your kids a whisk; and the CDC finds that Americans just can’t quit salt.

More Reasons to Go with the (Whole) Grains
In a study published this month in BMJ, researchers observed a lower risk of heart disease for every additional 7 grams of fiber consumed per day. The review of 22 previous studies, conducted at the School of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Leeds, in England, also looked at types and sources of fiber. Those who ate a combination of fiber sources from whole grains, legumes, nuts, fruits and vegetables had the lowest risk of heart disease.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 18, 2013

milkshakes

In this week’s news: A sugar vs. fat face-off; the secret to avoiding holiday bulge (yes, exercise works); and more restaurants try (but don’t always succeed) to meet the demand for gluten-free.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 11, 2013

nuts
In this week’s news: Why we should get cracking (nuts, that is); signs that diet soda is fizzling out (or would that be fizzing out?); and the true cost of healthy eating.

Pass the Cocktail Nuts
A recent study in The New England Journal of Medicine (and reported by the New York Times) looked at data from over 119,000 women and men in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Researchers found that study participants who ate nuts seven or more times a week had a 20% lower death rate than those who didn’t eat nuts over the same period of time. Even for those who only ate nuts less than once a week, the death rate was 11% lower. Participants ate a variety of nuts including pistachios, almonds, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts, cashews, pecans, pine nuts, peanuts, walnuts and macadamias.

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The Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 4, 2013

oatmeal
In this week’s news: More good news about oatmeal, fast-food receipts that make you rethink your order — plus the latest glimpse into Americans’ eating habits.

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