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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 25, 2013

whisk
In this week’s news: Scientists say that fiber is (still) good for heart health; nutrition experts explain why you might want to give your kids a whisk; and the CDC finds that Americans just can’t quit salt.

More Reasons to Go with the (Whole) Grains
In a study published this month in BMJ, researchers observed a lower risk of heart disease for every additional 7 grams of fiber consumed per day. The review of 22 previous studies, conducted at the School of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Leeds, in England, also looked at types and sources of fiber. Those who ate a combination of fiber sources from whole grains, legumes, nuts, fruits and vegetables had the lowest risk of heart disease.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 18, 2013

milkshakes

In this week’s news: A sugar vs. fat face-off; the secret to avoiding holiday bulge (yes, exercise works); and more restaurants try (but don’t always succeed) to meet the demand for gluten-free.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 11, 2013

nuts
In this week’s news: Why we should get cracking (nuts, that is); signs that diet soda is fizzling out (or would that be fizzing out?); and the true cost of healthy eating.

Pass the Cocktail Nuts
A recent study in The New England Journal of Medicine (and reported by the New York Times) looked at data from over 119,000 women and men in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Researchers found that study participants who ate nuts seven or more times a week had a 20% lower death rate than those who didn’t eat nuts over the same period of time. Even for those who only ate nuts less than once a week, the death rate was 11% lower. Participants ate a variety of nuts including pistachios, almonds, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts, cashews, pecans, pine nuts, peanuts, walnuts and macadamias.

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The Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, December 4, 2013

oatmeal
In this week’s news: More good news about oatmeal, fast-food receipts that make you rethink your order — plus the latest glimpse into Americans’ eating habits.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, November 27, 2013

kale
In this week’s news: The rise of vegan Thanksgiving, food banks that grow kale and the problem with pizza joints and calorie counts.

Pass the Tofu Drumstick
Having a vegan feast is becoming more popular. According to the Department of Agriculture, Americans ate about 12% less meat in 2012 than in 2007. Instead of turkey and trimmings, some Thanksgiving cooks are making tofurkey (tofu shaped like turkey) or cooking portobello mushroom steaks with kale salad, pecan stuffing and mushroom gravy on the side.

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This Week’s Nutrition News Feed

by in Food News, November 20, 2013

apple on newspaper
In this week’s news: The next green juice, texting for weight loss and restless nights for coffee lovers.

Move Over, Kale Juice
The newest juice trend is all about Brussels sprouts. Yes, the love-or-loathe-it vegetable has found its way into juicers. Liquid veggie enthusiasts in the U.K. claim that the cruciferous veggie will follow super-star leafy greens like kale and spinach into green drinks everywhere.

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The New Cholesterol Guidelines: Do They Affect Your Diet?

by in Food News, November 13, 2013

vegetables heart shape
News broke yesterday regarding new guidelines for prescribing statin medications. Doctors are being urged to use a revised set of criteria, established by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, to determine who should be prescribed cholesterol lowering medications.

Eating for Heart Health
The new guidelines also include recommendations for following a “healthy lifestyle” that entails exercising, not smoking and following a heart-healthy diet. In accordance with the American Heart Association paper, the American College of Cardiology recently released a Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk. Here is a summary of the dietary guidelines they lay out to help lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol.

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Trans Fats: What the News Means

by in Food News, November 8, 2013

doughnut
Everyone is talking about the FDA’s call for the complete removal of artificial trans fats from the food supply. What does this mean for the future of your diet?

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5 Chicken Kitchen Safety Tips

by in Food News, Food Safety, October 10, 2013

chicken meat
After nearly 300 people became sick from salmonella in 18 states, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a public health alert. The culprit is raw chicken produced at three Foster Farms facilities in California. Luckily, proper handling of poultry can help prevent illness. To do so, make sure to follow these five food safety rules.

#1: Defrost Properly
Those days of defrosting on your counter top overnight are long gone. One bacterium can multiply to 1 billion over 10 hours—something you don’t want to fool around with. To properly defrost chicken, place it in the refrigerator on a tray the night before. If you have smaller pieces of chicken, you can defrost in the microwave (look for the “defrost” button), as long as you cook them immediately after.

#2: Store Chicken Properly
When placing raw chicken in the refrigerator, make sure it is wrapped and stored on a lower shelf. Only proper cooking can destroy the bacteria, so foods that will not be further cooked (like cheese, veggies or fruit) should be placed above the raw chicken so the chicken juices won’t drip on them.

#3: Skip the Rinsing
Could it be that Julia Child’s habit of rinsing chicken has stuck with us after all these years? A recent study conducted at Drexel University found that 90% of folks still do it! For the first time, in 2005, the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans included food safety, and they advise against rinsing chicken before cooking. The reason is that those chicken juices get all over the place—other dishes, the inside of the sink and the counter tops–creating a bacterial playground.

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Why You Should Give Pale Veggies a Chance

by in Food News, September 19, 2013

white veggies

Health experts keep telling us to eat the rainbow, but according to one recent report, we should be eating more pale produce: Mushrooms, parsnips, onions, cauliflower and potatoes are surprisingly rich in fiber, magnesium and other nutrients. “A potato actually has more potassium than a banana,” says the paper’s author, Purdue University professor Connie Weaver. Another plus: Potatoes provide one of the best nutritional values per penny in the produce aisle—assuming, of course, that you don’t undo all of the good with a deep fryer.

(Photograph by Kang Kim)