All Posts In Food News

Nutrition News: The Truth About Pretzels, Mindless Diet Busters and Activated Charcoal Is a Trend

by in Food News, August 7, 2015

Take a Pass on Pretzels

Pretzels may be better than some fatty chips, but four out of five nutrition experts surveyed by Time say if you’re trying to eat healthy, pretzels shouldn’t be your go-to snack. Although pretzels are low-fat, they are also pretty paltry on the protein and fiber front, and they can be quite high in sodium and carbs. What’s more, they rank high on the glycemic index, meaning they can quickly spike blood sugar levels. “Pretzels are a snack food made from enriched flour, which provides very little fiber and overall very little nutritional benefit,” registered dietitian Kate Patton told the magazine. Patton recommends that those in search of a healthier alternative choose nuts, seeds, roasted edamame or popcorn. Read more

Celebs’ Favorite Healthy Foods

by in Food News, August 3, 2015

What healthy foods are the stars noshing on these days? Here’s an inside look at what’s hot in celebrity kitchens. Read more

Nutrition News: Chipotle Unseats Subway, FDA Added-Sugar Label Rules and Soybean Oil Health Effects

by in Food News, July 31, 2015

So Long, Subway. Hola, Chipotle!

Subway’s stint as America’s favorite “healthy” fast-food spot has reached its end. The sandwich chain has been bested by Chipotle, where sales have grown more than 20 percent this year. Meanwhile, sales at Subway — whose (now former) spokesman Jared Fogle has recently been embroiled in a scandal that is beyond distasteful — have sunk by 3 percent. While some experts have scoffed at Chipotle, whose tasty offerings are hardly low-cal, being labeled a “healthy” choice, the burrito chain has staked its claim to the title by using fresh, high-quality ingredients, maintaining high standards in its supply chain, preparing its food on the spot and in view of customers, and consistently publicizing its efforts to improve its product. Recently Chipotle announced it would no longer use GMO ingredients. Subway, on the other hand, struggled to overcome criticism that it used a chemical used in yoga mats and shoe rubber in its bread, though it subsequently discontinued the chemical’s use. Chipotle’s rise and Subway’s decline may also indicate changing attitudes about what constitutes “healthy”: “Millennials care less about calories and more about where their food comes from,” Darren Tristano, of the food industry research firm Technomic, told Business Insider. Read more

Nutrition News: Super-Healthy Olives, Cartoon-Character Cookie Effect, Local Eating Is In

by in Food News, July 24, 2015

Feel Good About Olives

Are olives a food you can feel good about eating? A panel of nutritionists and diet experts polled by Time magazine all say olives make a very healthy snack indeed. They point out that about four large olives have only about 20 calories, are nutritionally rich and contain about two grams of healthy monounsaturated fat, which benefits your heart, your brain and your belly. What’s more, olives are packed with antioxidants like biophenols, which keep bad cholesterol from building up in your artery walls. They’re also anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial, and aid in disease prevention. Plus, as a fermented food, they offer gut-friendly bacteria. One drawback: Because they are cured, olives may be high in salt, so the experts suggest you compensate by cutting out another salty snack. A small price to pay … Read more

Nutrition News: Time to Freeze Fish, Fruit and Veggie Fail, Calorie-Count Label Delay

by in Food News, July 17, 2015

Fresh Frozen Fish

Sushi and ceviche lovers, take note: Fish served raw or undercooked in New York City restaurants will soon be required to cool its fins for a bit in the freezer before it hits your plate — anywhere from 15 hours to a week, minimum, depending on the temperature and freezing process. The city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has issued the directive, set to take effect in August, in keeping with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations, which aim to rid fish of parasites and bacteria. According to The New York Times, however, many NYC chefs already flash-freeze their fish in order to rid it of potential pathogens, and say it does not affect taste. Read more

Are Your Food-Storage Methods Making You Eat More?

by in Food News, July 16, 2015

Is the way you store your food at home making you fat? Scientists at Ohio State University have looked into how the home environment may influence eating behaviors — and found that there may be a correlation between where you keep your food and how likely you are to be obese. Read more

Nutrition News: Sugary Drinks Are a Killer, Unhealthy Restaurant Food, When to Eat Bread

by in Food News, July 10, 2015

Sugary Drinks Are Killing Us … Really

How bad are sugary drinks for us? On a global scale, their toll is staggering. According to a recent analysis of data from dozens of international dietary surveys and large-scale studies, published online in Circulation, sugar-sweetened-beverage consumption causes more than 184,000 deaths — about 133,000 deaths from diabetes, 45,000 from cardiovascular disease and 6,450 from cancer — worldwide every year. (Gulp.) In the United States alone, about 25,000 deaths annually are attributable to sugary drinks, The New York Times reports, noting that experts are calling for the elimination of sugary drinks from our food supply altogether. Read more

Nutrition News: Papa John’s Ingredients, Good Fat, Creative Hydration Tips

by in Food News, July 3, 2015

A Healthier Slice

Chalk another one up for natural ingredients. Papa John’s will eliminate artificial ingredients and other additives from its menu items, it has announced. The move will cost the company about $100 million per year, Bloomberg reports. Last year the pizza chain removed monosodium glutamate (MSG) from its ranch dressing and trans fats from its garlic sauce; now it aims to eliminate 14 other ingredients, including corn syrup, artificial colors and several preservatives, many in the restaurants’ dipping sauces, by the end of 2016. The changes may affect some flavors, the company acknowledges, but Papa John’s, the third-largest pizza chain, behind Pizza Hut and Domino’s, is clearly trying to make good on its “better ingredients, better pizza” messaging. Read more

Nutrition News: General Mills Cereal Gets Real, Water Is Recalled, “Fitness” Food Fails

by in Food News, June 26, 2015

 General Mills’ Cereal Makeover

Trix are for kids who don’t want artificial flavors and colors in their cereal? Soon, silly rabbit, they will be. General Mills says it will remove artificial flavors and colors from the 40 percent of its cereals that still contain them. Trix and Reese’s Puffs will be among the first to lose the artificial ingredients, with new, less vibrantly hued versions (colored and flavored with fruit and vegetable juices and natural vanilla) expected this winter. By the end of 2017, General Mills says, artificial flavors and colors will be gone from all of its cereals, including those with marshmallows, as a response to consumer demand for “more recognizable and familiar ingredients” on cereal labels. Read more

Nutrition News: NYC Salt Proposal, “Healthy” Foods to Skip, Real vs. Artificial Sugar

by in Food News, June 19, 2015

NYC’s Planned Salt Shakeup

During his long reign as mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg introduced public health initiatives, including banning trans fats in food prepared in NYC restaurants and requiring restaurants to post calorie counts. Now, his successor, Mayor Bill de Blasio, has proposed requiring chain restaurants to print a warning symbol (a little salt shaker) next to menu items that contain more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium, the recommended daily intake per U.S. guidelines. The Wall Street Journal reports that restaurants aren’t happy about the plan, which the city’s Board of Health will vote on in September. “Every single ingredient if it’s in excess could obviously cause you problems,” restaurant industry advocate Melissa Fleischut griped to the Journal. “Do we label every ingredient?” Read more