All Posts In Food News

Nutrition News: Is Eating Egg Yolks as Bad as Smoking?

by in Food News, September 5, 2012

egg yolk
By now you’ve probably heard about the study claiming eating egg yolks is as bad for your heart as smoking. We just had to weigh in on this!

We Heart Eggs
We’ve already discussed the benefits of eggs. Eating them (yolks and all) offers protein, heart healthy omega-3 fats, plus cell-protecting antioxidants like lutein. Read up on these previous posts:

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New Study Reveals Fewer Calories in Almonds

by in Food News, August 30, 2012

almonds
Calling all almond lovers! A new study found that almonds have fewer calories than originally thought. We’ve got the inside scoop on this news.

The Study
A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that almonds have 20% fewer calories than originally thought. The results found that a one-ounce serving of almonds (about 23 nuts) has 129 calories as opposed to 160 that’s currently listed on the Nutrition Facts Panel.

Interestingly, it has nothing to do with the composition of the almond—rather, the way we metabolize it. Although it sounds nutty (pun intended), I had the pleasure to speak with Jenny Heap, MS, RD Manager, Healthy Professional Marketing for Almond Board of California to help decipher these findings.

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EWG Update: The Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen

by in Food News, Food Safety, July 22, 2012

dirty dozen
The Environmental Working Group constantly scrutinizes the amounts of pesticide residues found on popular produce. We want to keep you updated on which fruits and veggies you should buy organic – here’s a review of the 2012 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticide Residues.

The Dirty Dozen PLUS
The top 12 most contaminated had remained relatively consistent other than a few items shifting positions. But in 2012 a “PLUS” category was added to the original dozen. Conventionally-grown green beans, kale and collard greens have been given special consideration because of an especially dangerous toxin they are treated with. Organophosphate insecticides are toxic to the neurological system and are found in even higher amounts on bell peppers and nectarines (numbers 3 and 6 on the Dirty Dozen list).

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Is Nutritionally-Balanced Pizza Too Good to Be True?

by in Food News, July 13, 2012


A nutritionally-balanced pizza you can eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner sounds too good to be true, right? A Glasgow University scientist, Mike Lean, claims otherwise. He says the pizza contains exactly 1/3 of the recommended amount of calories, protein and carbohydrates, plus vitamins and minerals an adult should consume daily.

Seaweed is used in the pizza’s crust to lower the dish’s sodium level. Also added are “magnesium, potassium, folates, vitamin A and extra red pepper in the tomato sauce for a boost of vitamin C,” according to a recent article.

In theory, because it contains 30 percent of your balanced nutritional value for the day, you could eat it for breakfast, lunch and dinner with no negative health effects. The key: in theory.

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Food News: Kids Who Help Cook More Likely to Make Healthy Choices

by in Food News, July 5, 2012

cook with kids
Kids who lend a hand in the kitchen are more likely to make healthy food choices, according to a recent University of Alberta study.

The Canadian university surveyed fifth graders in 151 schools to learn about kids’ cooking experiences and food choices. “Kids who like fruits and vegetables more tend to eat them more frequently and have better diets,” said lead author Yen Li Chu, a post-doctoral fellow in the School of Public Health, in a recent interview. “These data show that encouraging kids to get involved in meal preparation could be an effective health promotion strategy for schools and parents.”

For the most part, children preferred fruits to vegetables, but those who helped with the cooking at home showed a greater preference for both, with a 10 percent higher interest in vegetables compared to their non-cooking counterparts. The research also showed those “who did meal prep and cooking were more confident about the importance of making healthier food choices,” according to the same article.

Kid-Friendly Recipes (to make with your kids!):

Tell us: Do you cook with your kids?

Does Healthy Food Cost More Than Junk Food?

by in Food News, June 21, 2012
apple on money
Does eating well cost more money?

Does following a healthy diet mean dishing out more dough? Not necessarily. A new study published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture revealed that healthy food isn’t any more expensive than junk food.

The Studies
With more than one-third of U.S. adults being overweight and a push from the Obama administration to fight rising obesity levels, this new study sheds light on budgetary concerns when it comes to healthy eating.

Previous studies were highly criticized for comparing the cost of food per calorie. These studies found that pastries and chips and cheaper than fruit and veggies. The newest study conducted by the Agricultural Department compared cost of foods by weight or portion size which reveals that grains, veggies, fruit and dairy foods are less costly than most meats or foods high in added sugar, salt, or artery-clogging saturated fat. The study found that carrots, banana, lettuce and pinto beans were all cheaper per portion than soda, ice cream, ground beef or French fries.

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Food News: Healthy Eating More Difficult Than Doing Taxes?

by in Food News, June 11, 2012
Taxes
Is eating well even tougher than doing taxes?

Navigating healthy eating doesn’t have to be tricky—yet knowing what to eat (and more importantly, what not to) stumps most Americans. In fact, according to a recent online survey, 52 percent of Americans think it’s easier to do their own taxes than it is to pick a healthy meal.

In particular, men, people lacking a college degree, overweight adults and those with high blood pressure, heart disease or high cholesterol were most likely to say they find it harder to know what they should or shouldn’t eat.

Based on data from the International Food Information Council Foundation’s 2012 Food & Health Survey taken by more than 1,000 men and woman ages 18 to 80, nine out of 10 people polled described their health as good or better, yet eating healthy was consistently a challenge for most.

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Nutrition News: Soda Debate Bubbles Up

by in Food News, June 10, 2012

soda
In an effort to help New Yorkers clean up their diets, Mayor Bloomberg has proposed a ban on large-sized sugary drinks. Will NYC lead the trend for other cites fighting the battle of the bulge?

The Fizzy Facts
If it were to take effect, this law would ban the sale of sugary beverages larger than 16 fluid ounces (2 cups). Fast food chains, restaurants, delis, food carts and sports arenas would have to comply. Vending machines and large bottles sold at supermarkets would not be affected.

A standard vending machine bottle of soda (20 fluid ounces) may contain anywhere from 16 to 22 teaspoons of sugar – that’s 240 to 330 empty calories! Energy drinks and sweetened teas (also part of the ban) contain high doses of added sweeteners as well.

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Is Sugar Toxic?

by in Food News, May 1, 2012
sugar on spoon
Is this sweet stuff toxic?

First fat was the enemy, then it was salt and now sugar. A recent episode of 60 Minutes titled “Is Sugar Toxic” had folks buzzing over Twitter and whispering at the water cooler. But is sugar really the enemy or is this yet another nutrient that’s being needlessly blackballed?

The Claims
Dr. Sanjay Gupta interviewed Dr. Robert Lustig, professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, who claims that sugar is to blame for diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and cancer. Much of the fat that’s been removed from low-fat foods gets replaced with sugar and Dr. Lustig hypothesizes that the way people eat sugar today is putting their health at risk. Sources of sugar include honey and table sugar along with foods that have hidden sources of sugar like yogurt, sauces, bread and peanut butter. As a result, Dr. Lustig recommends eliminating all sugar from our diet.

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Deciphering Health Studies

by in Food News, April 25, 2012
chocolate squares
Can chocolate make you thin? If a health study sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Reports on health studies appear on the news regularly. You might read one study that touts the benefits of a food – like chocolate, for example—while a different study doesn’t find the same benefits. These differing reports can get confusing . . . who you should believe?

Study Basics
Scientific studies are done in order to test a hypothesis—an assumption that needs to be investigated further. There are different types of studies—some look at past data collected while others compare data from subjects over months or even years. Other studies divide the group of subjects into 2 groups, giving only 1 of the groups the “treatment” (or food) while the other group is given a “control” oftentimes called a placebo.

The results are then compiled, statistical analysis is performed and conclusions are drawn.

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